Department of Neuroscience, Developmental and Regenerative Biology

Mission Statement

The mission of the Department of Neuroscience, Developmental and Regenerative Biology is to conduct high impact, internationally recognized research and to educate and train the next generation of leaders in biological sciences. As a department of neuroscientists, and developmental and regenerative biologists, we focus on understanding organismal, tissue and cellular function from molecules to behavior in health and disease.

General Information

The Department of Neuroscience, Developmental and Regenerative Biology study key questions relating to how the brain works in normal and disease states (neuroscience) and how cells and tissues are formedmaintainedand repaired (developmental and regenerative). Collectively and collaboratively, we seek to learn, investigate, and communicate knowledge in these fieldsOur diverse and recognized faculty and state-of-the-art laboratory facilities provide students with opportunities for personal interaction, mentorship, and undergraduate research projects.  

Neuroscience

Neuroscience research at UTSA is interdisciplinary and explores neural function from molecules to cells to neural networks to behaviorStudents will find a highly collaborative atmosphere across the departmentOur neuroscience laboratories employ behavioral, cellular, computational, developmental, and molecular approaches to answer questions associated with neural function. Many of our faculty are leading investigators attempting to understand debilitating brain diseases, including Alzheimer’s Disease, Parkinson’s Disease, and Epilepsy. Students also can participate in various neuroscience-related activities supported by the UTSA Neurosciences Institute and UTSA’s Brain Health Consortium, including weekly seminar and special seminar programsUndergraduate study in the neurosciences is directly supported through a Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in Neuroscience degree and Minor in Neuroscience. 

Developmental and Regenerative Biology 

Faculty and students in the areas of Developmental and Regenerative Biology study a wide range of questions relating to stem cells, cancer and cell cycle regulation, tissue regeneration, epigenetic regulation of cell fate and function, gene expression, fertility, and "Disease-in-a-Dish" models, including “organoid” systems. State-of-the-art technologies include genomics, epigenomics, proteomics, cell sorting, and cell imaging. A wide range of lecture courses are available to undergraduate students in Developmental and Regenerative Biology, along with opportunities for seminar classes, independent study, and directed research. Many of our faculty and students are associated with UTSA’s Institute of Regenerative Medicine, a joint collaborative initiative between UTSA’s Colleges of Engineering and Sciences, and multiple research institutions in San Antonio. Undergraduate students with interests in Developmental and Regenerative Biology are encouraged to attend a weekly Cell and Molecular Biology seminar series that frequently highlights research in this area. 

Degrees

Neuroscience is the interdisciplinary study of the nervous system across various levels — from molecules, to cells, through circuits, and behavior. Neuroscience represents a unique academic field, requiring students to understand and utilize a diverse knowledge base across multiple disciplines. The Department of Neuroscience, Developmental and Regenerative Biology offers a B.S. degree in Neuroscience and a Minor in Neuroscience for an interdisciplinary undergraduate experience for students interested in how the brain works.

The B.S. in Neuroscience curriculum is conceptually structured around i) an interdisciplinary foundation in the biological, psychological, and computational sciences, ii) a broad scope of electives for students to individualize their degree or pursue one of three neuroscience concentrations (Behavioral, Molecular, and Pre-medical), and iii) opportunities for research/practical experience. At its foundation, all students will take an introductory course in Neuroscience (Introduction to Neuroscience), Biology (Biosciences I), and Psychology (Introduction to Psychology). In subsequent years all students will take an upper-division class and laboratory in Neurobiology. Their first two years will also include a strong set of required courses in the sciences, math, and statistics. The remaining two years of the program is designed for the student to explore neuroscience across a wide range of disciplines, along with free electives, allowing for maximum flexibility in their chosen program of study. The B.S. in Neuroscience degree prepares students for careers in neuroscience-related fields, graduate-level study in masters and doctoral-level programs, and medical and dental school. Because of the broad training afforded by this program, graduates may find employment in many industries, including companies or government agencies associated with public health, biomedical engineering, education, psychology, and research.

The Minor in Neuroscience provides formal recognition for students who have focused a significant portion of their academic work in the interdisciplinary area of neuroscience. The minor can accommodate majors from all other departments.

Studies in Developmental and Regenerative Biology

The department offers several classes with a focus on biological principles of mammalian/human development, maintenance, and repair, from fertilized egg throughout adulthood. Students wishing to earn an undergraduate degree specializing in these fundamental questions can seek a B.S. in Biology with a Concentration in Cell and Molecular Biology from the Department of Integrative Biologyincluding courses in this area within the concentration's program of study.  

Student Success

The Department and Faculty supporting the B.S. in Neuroscience and Minor in Neuroscience, and B.S. in Biology with a Concentration in Cell and Molecular Biology, are committed to championing and developing the next generation of Neuroscience, Developmental and Regenerative Biology students at UTSA through multiple avenues of engagement and academic support. In addition to an innovative academic program, opportunities for participation in cutting-edge research, a vibrant “student-life”, and strong priorities of inclusion will foster student accomplishment within prestigious programs of study.

Health Careers Pathways

The Department of Neuroscience, Developmental and Regenerative Biology offers programs that supports students interested in pursuing professional or graduate programs (e.g., medical, dental, pharmacy and veterinarian) in health-related professions. See the Degrees page for more information. Students can also visit the UTSA Health Professions office for more information.

Sophomore Biology Research Initiative (SBRI)

The Sophomore Biology Research Initiative offers eligible second-year students to engage in authentic research with faculty and graduate students while earning academic credit. The opportunity to be part of the SBRI is limited, students should register early. See the Degrees page for more information about SBRI.


Bachelor of Science Degree in Neuroscience

The B.S. in Neuroscience is an interdisciplinary degree that will provide students the opportunity to pursue an integrated course of study in Neuroscience. Neuroscience represents a unique academic field in that it requires students to understand and utilize a set of diverse knowledge from multiple disciplines. Neuroscience impacts almost all areas of science and business, and this degree is intended to prepare students for a wide range of careers in this area. 

A minimum number of 120 semester credit hours is required for the B.S. in Neuroscience, including 42 hours of Core Curriculum requirements. Thirty-nine of the total semester credit hours required for the degree must be at the upper-division level. All major and support work courses, and required prerequisites, must be completed with a grade of “C-” or better.

Program Outcomes

Graduates of the B.S. in Neuroscience program will be able to:

  • Communicate across the biological, psychological, and computational sciences.
  • Identify and explain fundamental concepts in molecular neuroscience, cellular neurophysiology and signaling, neuroanatomy, neural information processing, and behavior.
  • Develop and conduct appropriate experimentation, analyze and interpret data, and use judgment to draw conclusions.

Sophomore Biology Research Initiative

Students may apply to participate in the Sophomore Biology Research Initiative. After acceptance, students will take NDRB 2953 Special Topics in two consecutive semesters during their sophomore year after completing their first 30 hours. Students should apply after their first semester. A total of six hours will be completed. Several different research topics will be available to choose from. There will be approximately two hours of lecture/lab meeting and six hours of lab work per week. Students will present their final data in poster format at an organized symposium. The opportunity to be part of the SBRI is limited, so students should register early.

Core Curriculum Requirements (42 semester credit hours)

Students seeking the B.S. degree in Neuroscience must fulfill University Core Curriculum requirements in the same manner as other students. The courses listed below satisfy both degree requirements and Core Curriculum requirements; however, if these courses are taken to satisfy both requirements, then students may need to take additional courses in order to meet the minimum number of semester credit hours required for this degree.

  • MAT 1193 may be used to satisfy the core requirement in Mathematics as well as a major requirement.
  • PSY 1013 may be used to satisfy the core requirement in Social and Behavioral Sciences as well as a major requirement.
  • BIO 1203 & PHY 1943 may be used to satisfy the core requirement in Life and Physical Sciences, as well as major requirements.
  • CS 1173 may be used to satisfy the core requirement in Component Area Option as well as a major requirement.

For a complete listing of courses that satisfy the Core Curriculum requirements, see Core Curriculum Component Area Requirements.

Core Curriculum Component Area Requirements

First Year Experience Requirement (3 semester credit hours)

All students must complete one of the following courses, for a total of 3 semester credit hours:

AIS 1203Academic Inquiry and Scholarship3
AIS 1213AIS: Architecture, Construction, and Planning3
AIS 1223AIS: Arts and Humanities3
AIS 1233AIS: Business3
AIS 1243AIS: Engineering, Mathematics, and Sciences3
AIS 1253AIS: Interdisciplinary Education3
AIS 1263AIS: Life and Health Sciences3
AIS 1273AIS: Social Sciences and Public Policy3

Communication (6 semester credit hours)

Students must complete the following courses, for a total of 6 semester credit hours:

WRC 1013Freshman Composition I3
WRC 1023Freshman Composition II3

Mathematics (3 semester credit hours)

Students must complete one of the following courses, for a total of 3 semester credit hours:

CS 1173Data Analysis and Visualization3
MAT 1023College Algebra with Applications3
MAT 1043Introduction to Mathematics3
MAT 1053Mathematics for Business3
MAT 1073Algebra for Scientists and Engineers3
MAT 1093Precalculus3
MAT 1133Calculus for Business3
MAT 1193Calculus for the Biosciences3
MAT 1214Calculus I4
STA 1053Basic Statistics3

Life and Physical Sciences (6 semester credit hours)

Students must complete two of the following courses for a total of 6 semester credit hours:

ANT 2033Introduction to Biological Anthropology3
AST 1013Introduction to Astronomy3
AST 1033Exploration of the Solar System3
BIO 1203Biosciences I for Science Majors3
BIO 1223Biosciences II for Science Majors3
BIO 1233Contemporary Biology I3
BIO 1243Contemporary Biology II3
CHE 1083Introduction to the Molecular Structure of Matter3
CHE 1093Introduction to Molecular Transformations3
ES 1113Environmental Botany3
ES 1123Environmental Zoology3
ES 1213Environmental Geology3
ES 2013Introduction to Environmental Science I3
ES 2023Introduction to Environmental Science II3
GEO 1013The Third Planet3
GEO 1033Geology of North American National Parks3
GEO 1123Life Through Time3
GES 2613Intro to Physical Geography3
PHY 1943Physics for Scientists and Engineers I3
PHY 1963Physics for Scientists and Engineers II3

Language, Philosophy and Culture (3 semester credit hours)

Students must complete one of the following courses, for a total of 3 semester credit hours:

AAS 2013Introduction to African American Studies3
AAS 2113African American Culture, Leadership and Social Issues3
ANT 2063Language, Thought, and Culture3
ARC 1113Introduction to the Built Environment3
ARC 2423Global History of Architecture and Urbanism: Renaissance to 19th Century3
CHN 1014Elementary Chinese I4
CLA 2013Introduction to Ancient Greece3
CLA 2023Introduction to Ancient Rome3
CLA 2323Classical Mythology3
CSH 1103Literary Masterpieces of Western Culture I3
CSH 1113Literary Masterpieces of Western Culture II3
CSH 1213Topics in World Cultures3
CSH 2113The Foreign Film3
ENG 2013Introduction to Literature3
ENG 2023Literature and Film3
ENG 2213Literary Criticism and Analysis3
ENG 2383Multiethnic Literatures of the United States3
ENG 2423Literature of Texas and the Southwest3
ENG 2443Persuasion and Rhetoric3
FRN 1014Elementary French I4
FRN 2333French Literature in English Translation3
GER 1014Elementary German I4
GER 2333German Literature in English Translation3
GES 1023World Regions & Global Change3
GLA 1013US in Global Context3
GRK 1114Introductory Classical Greek I4
HIS 2123Introduction to World Civilization to the Fifteenth Century3
HIS 2133Introduction to World Civilization since the Fifteenth Century3
HIS 2533Introduction to Latin American Civilization3
HIS 2543Introduction to Islamic Civilization3
HIS 2553Introduction to East Asian Civilization3
HIS 2573Introduction to African Civilization3
HIS 2583Introduction to South Asian Civilization3
HUM 2093World Religions3
ITL 1014Elementary Italian I4
ITL 2333Italian Literature in English Translation3
JPN 1014Elementary Japanese I4
LAT 1114Introductory Latin I4
MAS 2013Introduction to Chicano(a) Studies3
PHI 1043Critical Thinking3
PHI 2013Basic Philosophical Problems3
PHI 2023Introduction to Ancient Philosophy3
PHI 2033Introduction to Early Modern Philosophy3
PHI 2123Contemporary Moral Issues3
RUS 1014Elementary Russian I4
RUS 2333Russian Literature in English Translation3
SPN 1014Elementary Spanish I4
SPN 2333Hispanic Literature in English Translation3
WGSS 2013Introduction to Women’s Studies3
WGSS 2023Introduction to LGBTQ Studies3

Creative Arts (3 semester credit hours)

Students must complete one of the following courses, for a total of 3 semester credit hours:

AHC 1113Art History I3
AHC 1123Art History II3
ARC 1513Great Buildings and Cities of the World3
ARC 2413Global History of Architecture and Urbanism: Prehistory to Medieval3
ART 1103Introduction to Visual Arts3
BBL 2023Latino Cultural Expressions3
CLA 2033Introduction to Classical Literature3
DAN 2003Introduction to Dance3
HUM 2023Introduction to the Humanities I3
HUM 2033Introduction to the Humanities II3
HUM 2053History of Film3
MAS 2023Latino Cultural Expressions3
MUS 2243World Music in Society3
MUS 2633American Roots Music3
MUS 2653Music in Culture3
MUS 2663History and Styles of Jazz3
MUS 2673History and Styles of Rock3
MUS 2683History and Styles of Western Art Music3
MUS 2713History of Recorded Music3
MUS 2743Music and Film3
PHI 2073Philosophy of Art3

American History (6 semester credit hours)

Students must complete two of the following courses, for a total of 6 semester credit hours:

HIS 1043United States History: Pre-Columbus to Civil War Era3
HIS 1053United States History: Civil War Era to Present3
HIS 2053Texas History3

Government-Political Science (6 semester credit hours)

Students must complete two of the following courses, for a total of 6 semester credit hours:

POL 1013Introduction to American Politics3
and one of the following two courses:
POL 1133Texas Politics and Society3
POL 1213Civil Rights in Texas and America3

Social and Behavioral Sciences (3 semester credit hours)

Students must complete one of the following courses, for a total of 3 semester credit hours:

AMS 2043Approaches to American Culture3
ANT 1013Introduction to Anthropology3
ANT 2043Introduction to Archaeology3
ANT 2053Introduction to Cultural Anthropology3
BBL 2003Language, Culture, and Society3
BBL 2243Bilingual Families, Communities, and Schools: National and Transnational Experiences3
BIO 1033Drugs and Society3
CRJ 1113The American Criminal Justice System3
ECO 2003Economic Principles and Issues3
ECO 2023Introductory Microeconomics3
EGR 1343The Impact of Modern Technologies on Society3
ES 1003Survey Topics in Environmental Studies3
GES 1013Fundamentals of Geography3
GES 2623Human Geography: People, Place, Culture3
HTH 2413Introduction to Community and Public Health3
HTH 2513Personal Health3
IDS 2113Society and Social Issues3
PSY 1013Introduction to Psychology3
SOC 1013Introduction to Sociology3
SOC 2013Social Problems3
SOC 2023Social Context of Drug Use3

Component Area Option (CAO) (3 semester credit hours)

Students must complete either one of the following courses or any additional Core Curriculum course not previously used to satisfy a core component area requirement, for a total of 3 semester credit hours:

COM 2113Public Speaking3
EGR 1403Technical Communication3
ENG 2413Technical Writing3
PAD 1113Public Administration and Policy in American Society3
PHI 2043Introductory Logic3
Core Curriculum Component Area Requirements
First Year Experience Requirement 3
Communication 6
Mathematics 3
Life and Physical Sciences 6
Language, Philosophy and Culture 3
Creative Arts 3
American History 6
Government-Political Science 6
Social and Behavioral Sciences 3
Component Area Option 3
Total Credit Hours 42

Degree Requirements

A. Foundation Courses
1. Required Biology Courses
BIO 1203Biosciences I for Science Majors3
BIO 1201Biosciences I Laboratory for Science Majors1
BIO 2313Genetics3
2. Neuroscience required courses
NDRB 2113Introduction to Neuroscience3
NDRB 3433Neurobiology3
NDRB 3442Neurobiology Laboratory2
PSY 1013Introduction to Psychology3
3. Math requirement
MAT 1193Calculus for the Biosciences3
4. Data Analysis - pick one of the following3
Introduction to Computer Programming I
Data Analysis and Visualization
Introduction to Data Science
Programming for Data Science
5. Chemistry Requirements
CHE 1103General Chemistry I3
CHE 1121General Chemistry I Laboratory1
CHE 1113General Chemistry II3
CHE 1131General Chemistry II Laboratory1
6. Statistics 3
Probability and Statistics for the Biosciences
Statistics for Psychology
7. Physics. Select from one of the following options:4
Option 1
Algebra-based Physics I
Algebra-based Physics I Laboratory
Option 2
Physics for Scientists and Engineers I
Physics for Scientists and Engineers I Laboratory
B. Support Courses
1. Neuroscience. Select eight of the following:24
Animal Behavior
Neuroscience and Our Future
Brain Diseases
Neuropsychopharmacology
Developmental Neuroscience: From Zygote to Brain Circuits
Emergent Properties of Neural Circuits
Neural Data Science
Computational Neuroscience
Brain and Behavior
Cognitive Neuroscience
Cognitive Neuroscience
Independent Study
Laboratory Research
Special Studies
2. Additional Electives. Select four of the following:12
Courses not taken in B.1 (above) can be taken as Additional Electives
Cell Biology
Biochemistry
Biochemistry I
Molecular Biology
Developmental Psychology
Abnormal Psychology
Cognitive Psychology
Sensation and Perception
Experimental Psychology
Psychology of Health
Applied Statistics
Multivariate Analysis for the Life and Social Sciences
Philosophy of Science
Philosophy of Mind
Biomedical Ethics
C. Free Electives
Select 12-18 semester credit hours of free electives, depending on the student's choice of Core Courses, to complete 120 hours, including a minimum requirement of 39 upper-division semester credit hours.12-18
Total Credit Hours87-93

Concentrations

The Department of Neuroscience, Developmental and Regenerative Biology, within the B.S. in Neuroscience degree, offers three areas of concentration. To declare a concentration or obtain advice, students should consult an undergraduate academic advisor in the Life and Health Sciences Advising Center. To receive credit for a concentration, students must successfully complete all requirements for the B.S. degree, along with the requirements for the respective concentration. Students who do not successfully complete all courses of a given concentration area will receive a standard B.S. degree in Neuroscience.  

Concentration in Behavioral Neuroscience

The coursework within the Behavioral Neuroscience concentration must be completed with a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or better. Students are also encouraged to enroll in NDRB 4923 Laboratory Research as part of their program of study.

Select four of the following:
Animal Behavior
Cognitive Neuroscience
Laboratory Research
Sensation and Perception
Experimental Psychology
Cognitive Psychology
Total Credit Hours12

Concentration in Molecular Neuroscience

The coursework within the Molecular Neuroscience concentration must be completed with a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or better. Students are also encouraged to enroll in NDRB 4923 Laboratory Research as part of their program of study.

NDRB 3913Molecular Biology3
Select three of the following:
Cell Biology
Developmental Biology
Endocrinology
Laboratory Research
General Physiology
Biochemistry
Total Credit Hours12

Concentration in Pre-Medical Neuroscience

The B.S. degree in Neuroscience with a concentration in Pre-Medical Neuroscience is designed to prepare students for professional programs in medicine. This concentration has a recommended curriculum that is designed to meet the requirements for entry medical school and to prepare students for the MCAT examination. For completion of the Pre-Medical Neuroscience Concentration students must have both an overall math/science GPA of 3.5 or higher, and complete all required coursework within the concentration with a minimum GPA of 3.5 or higher. All candidates for the concentration in Pre-Medical Neuroscience must complete the following: 

CHE 2603Organic Chemistry I3
CHE 2612Organic Chemistry I Laboratory2
CHE 3643Organic Chemistry II3
Biochemistry - Select one of the following:3
Biochemistry
Biochemistry I
Select one of the two Physics options:4
Option 1
Algebra-based Physics II
Algebra-based Physics II Laboratory
Option 2
Physics for Scientists and Engineers II
Physics for Scientists and Engineers II Laboratory
Total Credit Hours15

Course Sequence Guide for the B.S. in Neuroscience Degree

Plan of Study Grid
First Year
FallCredit Hours
AIS 1263 AIS: Life and Health Sciences 3
BIO 1203
BIO 1201
Biosciences I for Science Majors
and Biosciences I Laboratory for Science Majors (core and major)
4
WRC 1013 Freshman Composition I (core) 3
MAT 1193 Calculus for the Biosciences 3
 Credit Hours13
Spring
PSY 1013 Introduction to Psychology (core and major) 3
NDRB 2113 Introduction to Neuroscience 3
CHE 1103 General Chemistry I 3
CHE 1121 General Chemistry I Laboratory 1
WRC 1023 Freshman Composition II (core) 3
STA 1403 Probability and Statistics for the Biosciences 3
 Credit Hours16
Second Year
Fall
BIO 2313 Genetics 3
PHY 1943 Physics for Scientists and Engineers I (core) 3
PHY 1951 Physics for Scientists and Engineers I Laboratory 1
POL 1013 Introduction to American Politics (core) 3
CHE 1113 General Chemistry II 3
CHE 1131 General Chemistry II Laboratory 1
 Credit Hours14
Spring
CS 1173 Data Analysis and Visualization 3
NDRB 3433 Neurobiology 3
NDRB 3442 Neurobiology Laboratory 2
American History (core) 3
Language, Philosophy & Culture (core) 3
Additional Neuroscience Elective (B.2) 3
 Credit Hours17
Third Year
Fall
POL 1133 Texas Politics and Society (core) 3
Neuroscience Support Course (B.1) 3
Neuroscience Support Course (B.1) 3
Additional Neuroscience Elective (B.2) 3
Elective 3
 Credit Hours15
Spring
American History (core) 3
Neuroscience Support Course (B.1) 3
Neuroscience Support Course (B.1) 3
Additional Neuroscience Elective (B.2) 3
Elective 3
 Credit Hours15
Fourth Year
Fall
Creative Arts (core) 3
Neuroscience Support Course (B.1) 3
Neuroscience Support Course (B.1) 3
Additional Neuroscience Elective (B.2) 3
Elective 3
 Credit Hours15
Spring
Neuroscience Support Course (B.1) 3
Neuroscience Support Course (B.1) 3
Elective 3
Elective 3
Elective 3
 Credit Hours15
 Total Credit Hours120

Minor in Neuroscience 

The Minor in Neuroscience is open to all majors in the University. To declare a Minor in Neuroscience or obtain advice, students should consult with their academic advisor. All students pursuing the minor must complete a minimum of 18 semester credit hours of neuroscience courses. It should be noted that students seeking a minor must also complete applicable support coursework in biology, chemistry, computer science, physics, mathematics and statistics, as needed to fulfill the normal prerequisites for any course listed below. All neuroscience courses and their prerequisites must be completed with a grade of “C-” or better, and students must achieve a grade point average of at least 2.0 on all work used to satisfy the requirements of the minor. 

A. Required Courses12
Biosciences I for Science Majors
Biosciences I Laboratory for Science Majors
Introduction to Neuroscience
Neurobiology
Neurobiology Laboratory
B. Organized Neuroscience Courses (Select 6 credit hours from the following)6
Animal Behavior
Neuroscience and Our Future
Brain Diseases
Neuropsychopharmacology
Developmental Neuroscience: From Zygote to Brain Circuits
Emergent Properties of Neural Circuits
Neural Data Science
Computational Neuroscience
Cognitive Neuroscience
Laboratory Research
Total Credit Hours18
 
 

Neuroscience, Developmental and Regenerative Biology (NDRB) Courses

NDRB 1033. Drugs and Society. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

An examination of licit and illicit drugs and their biosocial effects. Topics include pharmacology of alcohol, stimulants, hallucinogens, addiction, and abuse. May be applied toward the Core Curriculum requirement in Social and Behavioral Sciences. (Same as BIO 1033. Credit cannot be earned for both NDRB 1033 and BIO 1033.) Generally offered: Fall, Spring. Course Fees: LRC1 $12; LRS1 $45; STSI $21.

NDRB 2113. Introduction to Neuroscience. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: BIO 1203 (formerly BIO 1404). An introduction to the interdisciplinary field of Neuroscience, including understanding of the foundations of brain function, behavior, and neurological diseases from molecular, neuroanatomical, neurophysiological, neurochemical, and behavioral points of view. Generally offered: Fall, Spring. Course Fees: LRS1 $45, STSI $21.

NDRB 2953. Special Topics. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

An organized course offering the opportunity for specialized study not normally or not often available as part of the regular course offerings. Special Topics may be repeated for credit when the topics vary, but no more than 6 semester credit hours will apply to a bachelor's degree, regardless of discipline. No more than 6 semester credit hours of NDRB 2953, NDRB 4951, or NDRB 4953 can be applied to a Bachelor of Science degree in Neuroscience. Course Fees: LRS1 $45; STSI $21.

NDRB 3213. Animal Behavior. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: BIO 1203 (formerly BIO 1404); prior completion of BIO 1223 (formerly BIO 1414) recommended. This course will introduce various approaches to the study of animals and their behavior in natural habitats. The course will examine basic principles derived from studying the evolution, ecology, and development of animals, and use these principles to explain how and why animals behave as they do in particular situations. (Formerly BIO 3213. Credit cannot be earned for both NDRB 3213 and BIO 3213.) Generally offered: Fall, Spring, Summer. Differential Tuition $150.

NDRB 3362. Molecular Biochemistry Laboratory. (1-4) 2 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: BIO 2362, CHE 1103, and completion or concurrent enrollment in MAT 1093 or higher. A study of the microscopic, biochemical and molecular techniques used to investigate biochemical reactions and the structure and function of proteins in cells and tissues. Techniques will include protein extraction, protein characterization, enzyme kinetics, chromatography, western blotting, Immunofluorescence, and bioinformatics. (Formerly BIO 3522, BIO 3822, and BME 3114. Same as BIO 3362. Credit cannot be earned for both NDRB 3362 and BIO 3362 or NRDB 3362 and any of the following: BIO 3522, BIO 3822, or BME 3114.) Generally offered: Fall, Spring, Summer. Differential tuition: $100, Course Fees: IUB1 $10; L001 $30.

NDRB 3433. Neurobiology. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: NDRB 2113. Anatomy and physiology of nervous systems and the mechanisms of neuronal functions. Formerly BIO 3433. Credit cannot be earned for both NDRB 3433 and BIO 3433. Generally offered: Fall, Spring. Differential Tuition: $150.

NDRB 3442. Neurobiology Laboratory. (0-4) 2 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: NDRB 2113 and completion of or concurrent enrollment in NDRB 3433. A laboratory course emphasizing principles presented in NDRB 3433. (Formerly BIO 3442. Credit cannot be earned for both NDRB 3442 and BIO 3442.) Generally offered: Fall, Spring. Differential Tuition: $100. Course Fees: IUB1 $10; L001 $30.

NDRB 3453. Neuroscience and Our Future. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: NDRB 2113. A discussion of the implications of recent Neuroscience discoveries. Students will use available literature and their own powers of reason to separate fact from fantasy and determine what future applications of Neuroscience may be possible. (Formerly BIO 3453. Credit cannot be earned for both NDRB 3453 and BIO 3453.) Generally offered: Spring. Differential Tuition: $150.

NDRB 3463. Brain Diseases. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: NDRB 3433. A study of selected major brain diseases and neurological disorders, their underlying causes and treatments, and an emphasis on molecular mechanisms. Generally offered: Fall. Differential Tuition: $150.

NDRB 3623. Neuropsychopharmacology. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: NDRB 3433. A study of the pharmacology of drugs that affect the function of the central nervous system. Topics include drug-receptor interactions, drugs of abuse, and drugs used to treat mental illness. (Formerly BIO 3623. Credit cannot be earned for both NDRB 3623 and BIO 3623.) Generally offered: Fall. Differential Tuition: $150.

NDRB 3663. Human Embryology. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: BIO 2313. Development of the human embryo from fertilization to the birth of the fetus. The origin of various tissues and organs will be followed during development. Environmental and genetic factors that can alter development will be discussed. (Formerly BIO 3663. Credit cannot be earned for both NDRB 3663 and BIO 3663.) Generally offered: Fall. Differential Tuition: $150.

NDRB 3813. Cell Biology. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: BIO 2313; prior completion of BIO 3513 is recommended. A study of cellular molecules and metabolic processes, synthesis and regulation of macromolecules, differential gene expression, membranes and organelles, cytoskeleton, cell cycle, and growth of normal and neoplastic cells. Credit cannot be earned for both NDRB 3813 and BME 3114. (Formerly BIO 3813, credit also cannot be earned for both NDRB 3813 and BIO 3813.) Generally offered: Fall, Spring, Summer. Differential Tuition: $150.

NDRB 3913. Molecular Biology. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: BIO 2313; prior completion of BIO 3513 is recommended. A study of nucleotides, DNA, replication, recombination, RNA, transcription, genetic code, translation, genomes, and chromosomes. (Formerly BIO 3913. Credit cannot be earned for both NDRB 3913 and BIO 3913.) Generally offered: Fall, Spring. Differential Tuition: $150.

NDRB 3993. Principles of Cancer Biology. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: BIO 1203 (formerly BIO 1404). A broad introduction to mechanisms that produce oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. Methodologies of cancer assessment and prevention will be reviewed. (Formerly BIO 3933. Credit cannot be earned for both NDRB 3993 and BIO 3933.) Generally offered: Fall, Spring. Differential Tuition: $150.

NDRB 4143. Developmental Biology. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: BIO 2313; prior completion of BIO 3813 is recommended. Overview of developmental biology focusing on the origins of classical concepts as well as modern molecular approaches. Emphasis will be placed on the mechanisms underlying developmental processes using both invertebrate and vertebrate examples. Subjects include axis formation, induction, morphogenesis, embryonic pattern formation, cell differentiation, and organogenesis. (Formerly BIO 4143. Credit cannot be earned for both NDRB 4143 and BIO 4143.) Generally offered: Fall. Differential Tuition: $150.

NDRB 4153. Frontiers in Pluripotent Stem Cells. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: BIO 2313; prior completion of NDRB 3813 is recommended. The course covers interrelated topics such as pluripotency, cell fate specification, differentiation, patterning, organogenesis, morphogenesis, regeneration, and tissue engineering with an emphasis on human pluripotent stem cells and translational applications/emerging technologies related to regenerative medicine such as CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing and 3D organoids. Generally offered: Spring. Differential Tuition: $150.

NDRB 4453. Endocrinology. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: BIO 2313. Molecular, cellular, and physiological effects of hormones in health and disease. Topics include molecular mechanisms of hormone action in reproductive physiology, growth and development, and defects in hormonal regulation underlying clinically important syndromes (e.g., diabetes, hypertension, osteoporosis, and cancer). (Formerly BIO 4453. Credit cannot be earned for both NDRB 4453 and BIO 4453.) Generally offered: Fall. Differential Tuition: $150.

NDRB 4483. Developmental Neuroscience: From Zygote to Brain Circuits. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: BIO 2313, NDRB 3813, and NDRB 3433. A comparative developmental approach will be used to understand patterning mechanisms that control formation of the nervous system along the major axes of the body. Other topics include epigenetic mechanisms regulating neuronal plasticity and disease. Generally offered: Fall. Differential Tuition: $150.

NDRB 4583. Emergent Properties of Neural Circuits. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: NDRB 3433. An exploration of how interesting and useful functions arise in networks of neurons based on fundamental principles of cellular neurophysiology, neuroanatomy, and neurochemistry. (Formerly BIO 4583. Credit cannot be earned for both NDRB 4583 and BIO 4583.) Generally offered: Spring. Differential Tuition: $150.

NDRB 4683. Neural Data Science. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: MAT 1193, CS 1063 or DS 4013, STA 1403 or PSY 2073, and NDRB 2113. Analysis and interpretation of neurophysiological data, such as spike trains and EEG traces recorded from behaving animals or human subjects. While gaining hands-on computer-programming experience, this course will examine how neuroscientists use data analysis to investigate open questions. Lastly, more advanced “data science” techniques will tackle the complex data sets that arise from innovative brain-machine interfaces. Generally offered: Spring. Differential Tuition: $150.

NDRB 4783. Computational Neuroscience. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: MAT 1193, CS 1063 or DS 4013, STA 1403 or PSY 2073, and NDRB 2113, or consent of the instructor. An introduction to brain modeling and computational approaches to brain function. Topics include neural coding and the computational properties of neurons and neuronal networks. Generally offered: Fall. Differential Tuition: $150.

NDRB 4813. Brain and Behavior. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: NDRB 2113. This course explores the brain basis of behavior with a focus on understanding the neurophysiological, neurochemical, and neuroanatomical underpinnings for a variety of simple and complex behaviors. Students will explore topics such as sensation and perception, pain, movement, sleep, biological rhythms, emotions, addiction, learning and memory, and neurodevelopment. The topics are grounded with examples of typical human behavior and disorders such as Parkinson’s disease, Autism, Schizophrenia, and psychopathology. (Formerly BIO 4813. Credit cannot be earned for both NDRB 4813 and BIO 4813, nor PSY 4183.) Generally offered: Fall. Differential Tuition: $150.

NDRB 4823. Cognitive Neuroscience. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: NDRB 3433, or NDRB 4813, or PSY 4183, or consent of instructor. The biological basis of cognition including perception, attention, learning, memory, emotion, language, and executive function. The course introduces students to the use of human neuroimaging experiments and clinical population, and research with other species, to study the brain basis of complex behavior and cognitive disorders, such as memory loss, language impairment, and developmental disorders. (Formerly BIO 4823. Credit cannot be earned for both NDRB 4823 and BIO 4823.) Generally offered: Spring. Differential Tuition: $150.

NDRB 4911. Independent Study. (0-0) 1 Credit Hour.

Independent reading, research, discussion, and/or writing under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated for credit, but no more than 6 semester credit hours will apply to a bachelor’s degree, regardless of discipline. Only 6 semester credit hours of NDRB 4911-3, NDRB 4923, and NDRB 4993, in any combination, can be taken as NDRB electives. Additional research hours of these courses (excluding Independent Study) may be taken as free electives, for a maximum of 12 research hours being applied to the bachelor’s degree. Generally offered: Fall, Spring, Summer. Differential Tuition: $50.

NDRB 4912. Independent Study. (0-0) 2 Credit Hours.

Independent reading, research, discussion, and/or writing under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated for credit, but no more than 6 semester credit hours will apply to a bachelor’s degree, regardless of discipline. Only 6 semester credit hours of NDRB 4911-3, NDRB 4923, and NDRB 4993, in any combination, can be taken as NDRB electives. Additional research hours of these courses (excluding Independent Study) may be taken as free electives, for a maximum of 12 research hours being applied to the bachelor’s degree. Generally offered: Fall, Spring, Summer. Differential Tuition: $100.

NDRB 4913. Independent Study. (0-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Independent reading, research, discussion, and/or writing under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated for credit, but no more than 6 semester credit hours will apply to a bachelor’s degree, regardless of discipline. Only 6 semester credit hours of NDRB 4911-3, NDRB 4923, and NDRB 4993, in any combination, can be taken as NDRB electives. Additional research hours of these courses (excluding Independent Study) may be taken as free electives, for a maximum of 12 research hours being applied to the bachelor’s degree. Generally offered: Fall, Spring, Summer. Differential Tuition: $150.

NDRB 4923. Laboratory Research. (0-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Supervised laboratory research mentored by a faculty member engaged in active research within the student’s designated area of concentration. May be repeated for credit, but no more than 6 semester credit hours will apply to a bachelor’s degree. Only 6 semester credit hours of NDRB 4911-3, NDRB 4923, and NDRB 4993, in any combination, can be taken as NDRB electives. Additional research hours of these courses (excluding Independent Study) may be taken as free electives, for a maximum of 12 research hours being applied to the bachelor’s degree. Generally offered: Fall, Spring, Summer. Differential Tuition: $150.

NDRB 4951. Special Studies. (1-0) 1 Credit Hour.

An organized course offering the opportunity for specialized study not normally or not often available as part of the regular course offerings. Special Studies may be repeated for credit when the topics vary, but no more than 6 semester credit hours will apply to a bachelor’s degree, regardless of discipline. No more than 6 semester credit hours of NDRB 2953, NDRB 4951, or NDRB 4953 can be applied to a B.S. degree in Neuroscience. Generally offered: Fall, Spring, Summer. Differential Tuition: $50.

NDRB 4953. Special Studies. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

An organized course offering the opportunity for specialized study not normally or not often available as part of the regular course offerings. Special Studies may be repeated for credit when the topics vary, but no more than 6 semester credit hours will apply to a bachelor’s degree, regardless of discipline. No more than 6 semester credit hours of NDRB 2953, NDRB 4951, or NDRB 4953 can be applied to a B.S. degree in Neuroscience. Generally offered: Fall, Spring, Summer. Differential Tuition: $150.

NDRB 4993. Honors Research. (0-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to biology majors who are members of the Honors College, or who are pursuing College of Sciences Honors, and who are in their last two semesters of study; approval by the Honors College or College Honors Committee is required. Supervised research and preparation of an Honors Thesis. May be repeated for credit with approval, but no more than 6 semester credit hours will apply to a bachelor’s degree, regardless of discipline. Only 6 semester credit hours of NDRB 4911-3, NDRB 4923, and NDRB 4993, in any combination, can be taken as NDRB electives. Additional research hours of these courses (excluding Independent Study) may be taken as free electives, for a maximum of 12 research hours being applied to the bachelor’s degree. Generally offered: Fall, Spring. Generally offered: Fall, Spring. Differential Tuition: $150.