Department of Political Science and Geography

The Department of Political Science and Geography offers Bachelor of Arts degrees in Geography and Environmental Sustainability; Global Affairs; Political Science; and Politics and Law. The Political Science and Geography and Sustainability degrees have Social Studies Teaching Tracks. The Department also offers minors in Geography and Environmental Sustainability; Global Affairs; Latin American Studies; Political Science; and Politics and Law.

Department Honors and Signature Experience

The Honors Program of the Department of Political Science and Geography is an opportunity for advanced study for students who have demonstrated commendable academic performance. The prerequisites for a student’s participation in the Honors Program are a minimum grade point average of 3.0 at UTSA, a 3.5 grade point average in the major, and recommendation by a member of the Political Science and Geography faculty. Students who are approved will enroll in the appropriate honors thesis courses during their final semester at UTSA. To earn honors, the thesis must be passed by an Honors Committee that will be formed with the recommending faculty and two other faculty members. Students interested in the Honors Program should contact the Department for additional information.

As part of the College of Liberal and Fine Arts Signature Experience, which seeks to offer students opportunities to apply ideas and knowledge in real-world settings, the Department encourages students to enroll in mentorship courses such as an Internship, Independent Study, Study Abroad, and Research Practicum. Majors may apply 3 or 6 semester credit hours of internship study to their baccalaureate program. Internships entail supervised workplace experience, allowing the integration of academic and practitioner learning. The internship coordinator of the Department of Political Science and Geography oversees placement. Department faculty members provide supervision and grade internship performance. Further information can be obtained from the internship coordinator.

Independent Studies are arranged with Department faculty and normally cover topics that are not presented in listed courses. The Research Practicum enables students to focus on an applied research project that makes a contribution to the discovery or resolution of community needs.

Bachelor of Arts Degree in Geography and Environmental Sustainability

The minimum number of semester credit hours required for the Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree in Geography and Environmental Sustainability, including the Core Curriculum requirements, is 120. Thirty-nine of the total semester credit hours required for the degree must be at the upper-division level. At least 40 semester credit hours of geography coursework are required to fulfill the Geography and Environmental Sustainability major. The 40-hour total is considered a minimum, and students are encouraged to deepen and broaden their grasp of their major through careful allocation of their elective semester credit hours.

All candidates for this degree must fulfill the Core Curriculum requirements and the degree requirements, which are listed below.

Core Curriculum Requirements (42 semester credit hours)

Students seeking the B.A. degree in Geography and Environmental Sustainability must fulfill University Core Curriculum requirements in the same manner as other students. If courses are taken to satisfy both degree requirements and Core Curriculum requirements, then students may need to take additional courses in order to meet the minimum number of semester credit hours required for this degree.

GES 2613 may be used to satisfy a core requirement in Life and Physical Sciences as well as a major requirement.

GES 1023 may be used to satisfy a core requirement in Language, Philosophy and Culture as well as a major requirement

GES 1013 or GES 2623 may be used to satisfy a core requirement in Social and Behavioral Science as well as a major requirement

For a complete listing of courses that satisfy the Core Curriculum requirements, see Core Curriculum Component Area Requirements.

Core Curriculum Component Area Requirements

First Year Experience Requirement (3 semester credit hours)

All students must complete the following course, for a total of 3 semester credit hours:

AIS 1203Academic Inquiry and Scholarship3

Communication (6 semester credit hours)

Students must complete the following courses, for a total of 6 semester credit hours:

WRC 1013Freshman Composition I (Q)3
WRC 1023Freshman Composition II (Q)3

Mathematics (3 semester credit hours)

Students must complete one of the following courses, for a total of 3 semester credit hours:

MAT 1023College Algebra with Applications3
MAT 1033Algebra with Calculus for Business3
MAT 1043Introduction to Mathematics3
MAT 1073Algebra for Scientists and Engineers3
MAT 1093Precalculus3
MAT 1193Calculus for the Biosciences3
MAT 1214Calculus I4
STA 1053Basic Statistics3

Life and Physical Sciences (6 semester credit hours)

Students must complete two of the following courses for a total of 6 semester credit hours:

ANT 2033Introduction to Biological Anthropology3
AST 1013Introduction to Astronomy3
AST 1033Exploration of the Solar System3
BIO 1233Contemporary Biology I3
BIO 1243Contemporary Biology II3
BIO 1404Biosciences I4
BIO 1414Biosciences II4
ES 1113Environmental Botany3
ES 1123Environmental Zoology3
ES 1213Environmental Geology3
ES 2013Introduction to Environmental Science I3
ES 2023Introduction to Environmental Science II3
GEO 1013The Third Planet3
GEO 1123Life Through Time3
GES 2613Physical Geography3
PHY 1013Universes3
PHY 1943Physics for Scientists and Engineers I3
PHY 1963Physics for Scientists and Engineers II3

Language, Philosophy and Culture (3 semester credit hours)

Students must complete one of the following courses, for a total of 3 semester credit hours:

AAS 2013Introduction to African American Studies3
AAS 2113African American Culture, Leadership and Social Issues3
ANT 2063Language, Thought, and Culture3
ARA 1014Elementary Arabic I4
ARC 1113Introduction to the Built Environment3
ARC 1413Architecture and Culture3
CHN 1014Elementary Chinese I4
CLA 2013Introduction to Ancient Greece3
CLA 2023Introduction to Ancient Rome3
CLA 2323Classical Mythology3
CSH 1103Literary Masterpieces of Western Culture I3
CSH 1113Literary Masterpieces of Western Culture II3
CSH 1213Topics in World Cultures3
CSH 2113The Foreign Film3
ENG 2013Introduction to Literature3
ENG 2213Literary Criticism and Analysis3
ENG 2383Multiethnic Literatures of the United States3
ENG 2423Literature of Texas and the Southwest3
FRN 1014Elementary French I4
FRN 2333French Literature in English Translation3
GER 1014Elementary German I4
GER 2333German Literature in English Translation3
GLA 1013U.S. in the Global Arena3
GES 1023World Regional Geography3
GRK 1114Introductory Classical Greek I4
HIS 2123Introduction to World Civilization to the Fifteenth Century3
HIS 2133Introduction to World Civilization since the Fifteenth Century3
HIS 2533Introduction to Latin American Civilization3
HIS 2543Introduction to Islamic Civilization3
HIS 2553Introduction to East Asian Civilization3
HIS 2573Introduction to African Civilization3
HIS 2583Introduction to South Asian Civilization3
HUM 2093World Religions3
ITL 1014Elementary Italian I4
ITL 2333Italian Literature in English Translation3
JPN 1014Elementary Japanese I4
LAT 1114Introductory Latin I4
MAS 2013Introduction to Chicano(a) Studies3
PHI 1043Critical Thinking3
PHI 2023Introduction to Ancient Philosophy3
PHI 2033Introduction to Early Modern Philosophy3
PHI 2123Contemporary Moral Issues3
RUS 1014Elementary Russian I4
RUS 2333Russian Literature in English Translation3
SPN 1014Elementary Spanish I4
SPN 2333Hispanic Literature in English Translation3
WS 2013Introduction to Women’s Studies3
WS 2023Introduction to LGBTQ Studies3

Creative Arts (3 semester credit hours)

Students must complete one of the following courses, for a total of 3 semester credit hours:

AHC 1113Survey of Art and Architecture from Prehistoric Times to 13503
AHC 1123Survey of Art and Architecture in Europe and the New World from 1350 to 17503
AHC 1133Survey of Modern Art3
ARC 1213Design I3
ARC 1513Great Buildings and Cities of the World3
ART 1103Introduction to Visual Arts3
ART 1143Art for Non-Art Majors3
CLA 2033Introduction to Classical Literature3
DAN 2003Introduction to Dance3
ENG 1113Introduction to Creative Literary Arts3
HUM 2023Introduction to the Humanities I3
HUM 2033Introduction to the Humanities II3
HUM 2053History of Film3
MAS 2023Latino Cultural Expressions3
MUS 2243World Music in Society3
MUS 2623Fundamentals of Music for the Non-Music Major3
MUS 2633American Roots Music3
MUS 2663History and Styles of Jazz3
MUS 2673History and Styles of Rock3
MUS 2683Masterpieces of Music3
MUS 2693The Music of Latin America and the Caribbean3
MUS 2743Music and Film3
PHI 2073Philosophy of Art3

American History (6 semester credit hours)

Students must complete two of the following courses, for a total of 6 semester credit hours:

HIS 1043United States History: Pre-Columbus to Civil War Era3
HIS 1053United States History: Civil War Era to Present3
HIS 2053Texas History3

Government-Political Science (6 semester credit hours)

Students must complete two of the following courses, for a total of 6 semester credit hours:

POL 1013Introduction to American Politics3
and one of the following two courses:
POL 1133Texas Politics and Society3
POL 1213Civil Rights in Texas and America3

Social and Behavioral Sciences (3 semester credit hours)

Students must complete one of the following courses, for a total of 3 semester credit hours:

AMS 2043Approaches to American Culture3
ANT 1013Introduction to Anthropology3
ANT 2043Introduction to Archaeology3
ANT 2053Introduction to Cultural Anthropology3
BBL 2003Language, Culture, and Society3
BBL 2243Globalizing the Local: Bilingual Families, Communities, and Schools3
BIO 1033Drugs and Society3
CRJ 1113The American Criminal Justice System3
ECO 2003Economic Principles and Issues3
ECO 2023Introductory Microeconomics3
EGR 1343The Impact of Modern Technologies on Society3
GES 1013Fundamentals of Geography3
GES 2623Human Geography3
HTH 2413Introduction to Community and Public Health3
HTH 2513Personal Health3
IDS 2113Society and Social Issues3
PSY 1013Introduction to Psychology3
SOC 1013Introduction to Sociology3
SOC 2013Social Problems3
SOC 2023Social Context of Drug Use3

Component Area Option (CAO) (3 semester credit hours)

Students must complete either one of the following courses or any additional Core Curriculum course not previously used to satisfy a core component area requirement, for a total of 3 semester credit hours:

COM 2113Public Speaking3
CS 1173Data Analysis and Visualization3
EGR 1403Technical Communication3
ENG 2413Technical Writing3
PAD 1113Public Administration in American Society3
PHI 2043Introductory Logic3
Core Curriculum Component Area Requirements
First Year Experience Requirement 3
Communication 6
Mathematics 3
Life and Physical Sciences 6
Language, Philosophy and Culture 3
Creative Arts 3
American History 6
Government-Political Science 6
Social and Behavioral Sciences 3
Component Area Option 3
Total Credit Hours 42

Degree Requirements

A. Courses in the major
40 semester credit hours in the major, 24 must be at the upper-division level.
1. Required courses:13
Physical Geography
Human Geography
Introduction to Geographic Information Systems
Spatial Analysis
2. Select 3 credit hours from the following:3
Fundamentals of Geography
World Regional Geography
3. Select 9 credit hours of regional geography courses:9
Geography of the United States and Canada
Geography of Latin America
Geography of Europe
Geography of Mexico
Geography of Texas
Physical and Cultural Geography of the American Southwest
Geopolitics of Russia and Eurasia
The Geography and Politics of the Asian Rim
Study Abroad: Geography and Environmental Sustainability
4. Select 15 additional credit hours of Geography and Environmental Sustainability electives. These may include courses from the following lists:15
Earth science, resources, and the environment
Global Sustainability
Conservation of Resources
Geography of Natural Hazards
Weather and Climate
Physiography
Biogeography
Climate Change
Economic, political, population, and cultural studies
Revealing Geography through Film and Pop Culture
Medical Geography
Population Geography
Geography of Tourism
Geography of Local Economic Activity
Behavioral Geography
Geography of Globalization and Development
Political Geography
Space and Identity Crisis in the Postmodern Era
Geographic Information Systems and cartography
Advanced Geographic Information Systems
Analytical and Computer Cartography
Urban studies
Urban Geography
Introduction to Urban Planning
Urban Development: Politics, Planning and Power
Gender and Cities: An Introduction to Feminist Geography
Urban Sustainability in Global Context
Urban and Regional Analysis
Additional regional courses selected from item 3 above
B. Single language other than English
Select 6 semester credit hours of a single language other than English6
C. Electives
Select 32 semester credit hours of electives. In fulfillment of this requirement, majors are encouraged to take at least 9 semester credit hours of upper-division coursework in disciplines that support the study of geography in the following areas: 32
Urban, economic, political, population, and cultural studies
International courses including global affairs
Earth science and resources
Total Credit Hours78

Degree Requirements: B.A. Degree in Geography and Environmental Sustainability – Social Studies Teaching Track

A. Required courses
Courses marked with an asterisk (*) may also be used to satisfy Core Curriculum requirements.
ECO 2003Economic Principles and Issues (*)3
GES 1013Fundamentals of Geography (*)3
GES 1023World Regional Geography (*)3
GES 2613Physical Geography (*)3
GES 2623Human Geography3
HIS 1043United States History: Pre-Columbus to Civil War Era (*)3
HIS 1053United States History: Civil War Era to Present (*)3
HIS 2053Texas History3
HIS 2123Introduction to World Civilization to the Fifteenth Century3
HIS 2133Introduction to World Civilization since the Fifteenth Century3
POL 1013Introduction to American Politics (*)3
POL 1133Texas Politics and Society (*)3
B. Upper-division History course
Select one course in U.S. history3
C. Geography
Select four courses from the list below12
Global Sustainability
Geography of the United States and Canada
Geography of Latin America
Geography of Europe
Geography of Texas
Cultural Geography
Geography of Globalization and Development
Political Geography
Gender and Cities: An Introduction to Feminist Geography
Urban Sustainability in Global Context
Climate Change
D. Government Institutions
Select three courses from the list below9
The American Legal Process
The American Presidency
The Supreme Court
Constitutional Law I
Political Parties and Interest Groups
The Legislative Process
American Foreign Policy since World War II
E. Upper-division Geography and Environmental Sustainability courses
12 semester credit hours of upper-division GES courses12
F. Teacher Certification courses 30
Total Credit Hours102

Course Sequence Guide for B.A. Degree in Geography and Environmental Sustainability

This course sequence guide is designed to assist students in completing their UTSA undergraduate Geography and Environmental Sustainability degree requirements. This is merely a guide and students must satisfy other requirements of this catalog and meet with their academic advisor for individualized degree plans. Progress within this guide depends upon such factors as course availability, individual student academic preparation, student time management, work obligations, and individual financial considerations. Students may choose to take courses during Summer terms to reduce course loads during long semesters.

B.A. in Geography and Environmental Sustainability – Four-Year Academic Plan

First Year
FallCredit Hours
AIS 1203Academic Inquiry and Scholarship (core) 3
GES 2613Physical Geography (core and major) 3
HIS 1043, 1053, or 2053United States History: Pre-Columbus to Civil War Era, or United States History: Civil War Era to Present, or Texas History (core) 3
POL 1013Introduction to American Politics (core) 3
WRC 1013Freshman Composition I (Q) (core) 3
Spring
GES 1013 or 1023Fundamentals of Geography (or World Regional Geography) 3
HIS 1043, 1053, or 2053United States History: Pre-Columbus to Civil War Era, or United States History: Civil War Era to Present, or Texas History (core) 3
POL 1133 or 1213Texas Politics and Society (core) 3
WRC 1023Freshman Composition II (Q) (core) 3
Life & Physical Sciences core 3
Second Year
Fall
GES 2623Human Geography (core and major) 3
Creative Arts core 3
Free elective 3
Free elective 3
Free elective 3
Spring
Component Area Option core 3
Language, Philosophy & Culture core 3
Mathematics core 3
Free elective 3
Free elective 3
Third Year
Fall
Regional geography course (See item A.3. in degree requirements.) 3
Foreign language (semester I) 3-4
Upper-division GES elective 3
Upper-division free elective 3
Free elective 3
Spring
GES 3323Spatial Analysis 3
Regional geography course (See item A.3. in degree requirements.) 3
Free elective 3
Upper-division GES elective 3
Foreign language (semester II) 3-4
Fourth Year
Fall
GES 3314Introduction to Geographic Information Systems 4
Regional geography course (See item A.3. in degree requirements.) 3
Upper-division free elective 3
Upper-division free elective 3
Upper-division GES elective 3
Spring
GES elective 3
Free elective (to meet 120 hour minimum) 0-2
Upper-division free elective 3
Upper-division free elective 3
Upper-division GES elective 3
 Total Credit Hours: 120.0

Bachelor of Arts Degree in Global Affairs

The minimum number of semester credit hours required for the Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree in Global Affairs, including the Core Curriculum requirements, is 120. Thirty-nine of the total semester credit hours required for the degree must be at the upper-division level. At least 42 semester credit hours of Global Affairs coursework are required to fulfill the Global Affairs major. The 42-hour total is considered a minimum, and students are encouraged to deepen and broaden their grasp of the major through careful allocation of elective semester credit hours.

All candidates for this degree must fulfill the Core Curriculum requirements and the degree requirements, which are listed below.

Core Curriculum Requirements (42 semester credit hours)

Students seeking the B.A. degree in Global Affairs must fulfill University Core Curriculum requirements in the same manner as other students. If courses are taken to satisfy both degree requirements and Core Curriculum requirements, then students may need to take additional courses in order to meet the minimum number of semester credit hours required for this degree.

GLA 1013 should be used to satisfy the core requirement for Language, Philosophy and Culture. All Global Affairs majors are required to take GLA 1013 as a prerequisite for upper-division GLA courses.

For a complete listing of courses that satisfy the Core Curriculum requirements, see Core Curriculum Component Area Requirements.

Core Curriculum Component Area Requirements

First Year Experience Requirement (3 semester credit hours)

All students must complete the following course, for a total of 3 semester credit hours:

AIS 1203Academic Inquiry and Scholarship3

Communication (6 semester credit hours)

Students must complete the following courses, for a total of 6 semester credit hours:

WRC 1013Freshman Composition I (Q)3
WRC 1023Freshman Composition II (Q)3

Mathematics (3 semester credit hours)

Students must complete one of the following courses, for a total of 3 semester credit hours:

MAT 1023College Algebra with Applications3
MAT 1033Algebra with Calculus for Business3
MAT 1043Introduction to Mathematics3
MAT 1073Algebra for Scientists and Engineers3
MAT 1093Precalculus3
MAT 1193Calculus for the Biosciences3
MAT 1214Calculus I4
STA 1053Basic Statistics3

Life and Physical Sciences (6 semester credit hours)

Students must complete two of the following courses for a total of 6 semester credit hours:

ANT 2033Introduction to Biological Anthropology3
AST 1013Introduction to Astronomy3
AST 1033Exploration of the Solar System3
BIO 1233Contemporary Biology I3
BIO 1243Contemporary Biology II3
BIO 1404Biosciences I4
BIO 1414Biosciences II4
ES 1113Environmental Botany3
ES 1123Environmental Zoology3
ES 1213Environmental Geology3
ES 2013Introduction to Environmental Science I3
ES 2023Introduction to Environmental Science II3
GEO 1013The Third Planet3
GEO 1123Life Through Time3
GES 2613Physical Geography3
PHY 1013Universes3
PHY 1943Physics for Scientists and Engineers I3
PHY 1963Physics for Scientists and Engineers II3

Language, Philosophy and Culture (3 semester credit hours)

Students must complete one of the following courses, for a total of 3 semester credit hours:

AAS 2013Introduction to African American Studies3
AAS 2113African American Culture, Leadership and Social Issues3
ANT 2063Language, Thought, and Culture3
ARA 1014Elementary Arabic I4
ARC 1113Introduction to the Built Environment3
ARC 1413Architecture and Culture3
CHN 1014Elementary Chinese I4
CLA 2013Introduction to Ancient Greece3
CLA 2023Introduction to Ancient Rome3
CLA 2323Classical Mythology3
CSH 1103Literary Masterpieces of Western Culture I3
CSH 1113Literary Masterpieces of Western Culture II3
CSH 1213Topics in World Cultures3
CSH 2113The Foreign Film3
ENG 2013Introduction to Literature3
ENG 2213Literary Criticism and Analysis3
ENG 2383Multiethnic Literatures of the United States3
ENG 2423Literature of Texas and the Southwest3
FRN 1014Elementary French I4
FRN 2333French Literature in English Translation3
GER 1014Elementary German I4
GER 2333German Literature in English Translation3
GLA 1013U.S. in the Global Arena3
GES 1023World Regional Geography3
GRK 1114Introductory Classical Greek I4
HIS 2123Introduction to World Civilization to the Fifteenth Century3
HIS 2133Introduction to World Civilization since the Fifteenth Century3
HIS 2533Introduction to Latin American Civilization3
HIS 2543Introduction to Islamic Civilization3
HIS 2553Introduction to East Asian Civilization3
HIS 2573Introduction to African Civilization3
HIS 2583Introduction to South Asian Civilization3
HUM 2093World Religions3
ITL 1014Elementary Italian I4
ITL 2333Italian Literature in English Translation3
JPN 1014Elementary Japanese I4
LAT 1114Introductory Latin I4
MAS 2013Introduction to Chicano(a) Studies3
PHI 1043Critical Thinking3
PHI 2023Introduction to Ancient Philosophy3
PHI 2033Introduction to Early Modern Philosophy3
PHI 2123Contemporary Moral Issues3
RUS 1014Elementary Russian I4
RUS 2333Russian Literature in English Translation3
SPN 1014Elementary Spanish I4
SPN 2333Hispanic Literature in English Translation3
WS 2013Introduction to Women’s Studies3
WS 2023Introduction to LGBTQ Studies3

Creative Arts (3 semester credit hours)

Students must complete one of the following courses, for a total of 3 semester credit hours:

AHC 1113Survey of Art and Architecture from Prehistoric Times to 13503
AHC 1123Survey of Art and Architecture in Europe and the New World from 1350 to 17503
AHC 1133Survey of Modern Art3
ARC 1213Design I3
ARC 1513Great Buildings and Cities of the World3
ART 1103Introduction to Visual Arts3
ART 1143Art for Non-Art Majors3
CLA 2033Introduction to Classical Literature3
DAN 2003Introduction to Dance3
ENG 1113Introduction to Creative Literary Arts3
HUM 2023Introduction to the Humanities I3
HUM 2033Introduction to the Humanities II3
HUM 2053History of Film3
MAS 2023Latino Cultural Expressions3
MUS 2243World Music in Society3
MUS 2623Fundamentals of Music for the Non-Music Major3
MUS 2633American Roots Music3
MUS 2663History and Styles of Jazz3
MUS 2673History and Styles of Rock3
MUS 2683Masterpieces of Music3
MUS 2693The Music of Latin America and the Caribbean3
MUS 2743Music and Film3
PHI 2073Philosophy of Art3

American History (6 semester credit hours)

Students must complete two of the following courses, for a total of 6 semester credit hours:

HIS 1043United States History: Pre-Columbus to Civil War Era3
HIS 1053United States History: Civil War Era to Present3
HIS 2053Texas History3

Government-Political Science (6 semester credit hours)

Students must complete two of the following courses, for a total of 6 semester credit hours:

POL 1013Introduction to American Politics3
and one of the following two courses:
POL 1133Texas Politics and Society3
POL 1213Civil Rights in Texas and America3

Social and Behavioral Sciences (3 semester credit hours)

Students must complete one of the following courses, for a total of 3 semester credit hours:

AMS 2043Approaches to American Culture3
ANT 1013Introduction to Anthropology3
ANT 2043Introduction to Archaeology3
ANT 2053Introduction to Cultural Anthropology3
BBL 2003Language, Culture, and Society3
BBL 2243Globalizing the Local: Bilingual Families, Communities, and Schools3
BIO 1033Drugs and Society3
CRJ 1113The American Criminal Justice System3
ECO 2003Economic Principles and Issues3
ECO 2023Introductory Microeconomics3
EGR 1343The Impact of Modern Technologies on Society3
GES 1013Fundamentals of Geography3
GES 2623Human Geography3
HTH 2413Introduction to Community and Public Health3
HTH 2513Personal Health3
IDS 2113Society and Social Issues3
PSY 1013Introduction to Psychology3
SOC 1013Introduction to Sociology3
SOC 2013Social Problems3
SOC 2023Social Context of Drug Use3

Component Area Option (CAO) (3 semester credit hours)

Students must complete either one of the following courses or any additional Core Curriculum course not previously used to satisfy a core component area requirement, for a total of 3 semester credit hours:

COM 2113Public Speaking3
CS 1173Data Analysis and Visualization3
EGR 1403Technical Communication3
ENG 2413Technical Writing3
PAD 1113Public Administration in American Society3
PHI 2043Introductory Logic3
Core Curriculum Component Area Requirements
First Year Experience Requirement 3
Communication 6
Mathematics 3
Life and Physical Sciences 6
Language, Philosophy and Culture 3
Creative Arts 3
American History 6
Government-Political Science 6
Social and Behavioral Sciences 3
Component Area Option 3
Total Credit Hours 42

Degree Requirements

A. Courses in the major
42 semester credit hours in the major, 30 of which must be at the upper-division level.
1. Select one of the following introductory courses on global affairs:3
Introduction to Global Affairs Studies
Comparative Politics
2. Required methods courses:6
Designing Research in Political Science
and one of the following
Research Methods in Global Affairs
Advanced Techniques in Global Affairs
Quantitative Methods in Political Science
3. Required course on Theories of International Relations3
Theories of International Relations
4. Select three of the following Foundations of Global Affairs courses:9
International Law
Theories of International Relations
Theories of International Justice
International Political Economy
International Organizations in World Politics
Force in International Politics
Globalization
Democracy and World Politics
Study Abroad: Global Affairs
5. Select three of the following Governance and Policy in Global Affairs courses:9
International Governance
International Human Rights
American Foreign Policy since World War II
The United Nations
Diplomacy
Current Issues in World Politics
The Intelligence Community and Global Affairs
Conflict, Law, and Security in Global Affairs
Model UN
Study Abroad: Global Affairs
6. Select three of the following Regional Studies courses:9
East European Politics
Latin American Politics
European Governments
Geopolitics of Russia and Eurasia
Governments and Politics of Southeast Asia
Governments and Politics of East Asia
Politics of Mexico
Politics of the Third World
Latin America in the World
Politics of the Middle East
Topics in Latin American Security
Study Abroad: Global Affairs
7. Senior seminar course:3
Seminar in Global Affairs
B. A single language other than English
6 semester credit hours of a language 6
C. Electives
30 semester credit hours of electives 30
Total Credit Hours78

Course Sequence Guide for B.A. Degree in Global Affairs

This course sequence guide is designed to assist students in completing their UTSA undergraduate Global Affairs degree requirements. This is merely a guide and students must satisfy other requirements of this catalog and meet with their academic advisor for individualized degree plans. Progress within this guide depends upon such factors as course availability, individual student academic preparation, student time management, work obligations, and individual financial considerations. Students may choose to take courses during Summer terms to reduce course loads during long semesters.

B.A. in Global Affairs – Four-Year Academic Plan

First Year
FallCredit Hours
AIS 1203Academic Inquiry and Scholarship (core) 3
HIS 1043, 1053, or 2053United States History: Pre-Columbus to Civil War Era, or United States History: Civil War Era to Present, or Texas History (core) 3
POL 1013Introduction to American Politics (core) 3
WRC 1013Freshman Composition I (Q) (core) 3
Mathematics core 3
Spring
HIS 1043, 1053, or 2053United States History: Pre-Columbus to Civil War Era, or United States History: Civil War Era to Present, or Texas History (core) 3
POL 1133 or 1213Texas Politics and Society (core) 3
WRC 1023Freshman Composition II (Q) (core) 3
Life & Physical Sciences core 3
Free elective 3
Second Year
Fall
GLA 1013U.S. in the Global Arena (core) 3
Life & Physical Sciences core 3
Social & Behavioral Sciences core 3
GLA elective 3
Free elective 3
Spring
GLA 2603 or 2633Introduction to Global Affairs Studies (or Comparative Politics) 3
GLA elective 3
Free elective 3
Creative Arts core 3
Component Area Option core 3
Third Year
Fall
POL 2693Designing Research in Political Science 3
Foreign language (semester I) 3-4
GLA elective 3
Free elective 3
Free elective 3
Spring
Foreign language (semester II) 3-4
Upper-division free elective 3
Upper-division GLA course 3
GLA elective 3
Free elective 3
Fourth Year
Fall
Upper-division free elective 3
Upper-division free elective 3
Upper-division GLA elective 3
Upper-division GLA course 3
Upper-division GLA course 3
Spring
GLA 4973Seminar in Global Affairs 3
Upper-division free elective 3
Upper-division free elective 3
Upper-division GLA course 3
Free elective (to meet 120 hour minimum) 1-3
 Total Credit Hours: 120.0

Bachelor of Arts Degree in Political Science

The minimum number of semester credit hours required for the Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree in Political Science, including the Core Curriculum requirements, is 120. Thirty-nine of the total semester credit hours required for the degree must be at the upper-division level. At least 39 semester credit hours of Political Science coursework are required to fulfill the Political Science major. The 39-hour total is considered a minimum, and students are encouraged to deepen and broaden their grasp of their major through careful allocation of their elective semester credit hours. These courses, which require advance approval from the academic advisor, should serve to introduce students to other social sciences.

All candidates for this degree must fulfill the Core Curriculum requirements and the degree requirements, which are listed below.

Core Curriculum Requirements (42 semester credit hours)

Students seeking the B.A. degree in Political Science must fulfill University Core Curriculum requirements in the same manner as other students. If courses are taken to satisfy both degree requirements and Core Curriculum requirements, then students may need to take additional courses in order to meet the minimum number of semester credit hours required for this degree.

For a complete listing of courses that satisfy the Core Curriculum requirements, see Core Curriculum Component Area Requirements.

Core Curriculum Component Area Requirements

First Year Experience Requirement (3 semester credit hours)

All students must complete the following course, for a total of 3 semester credit hours:

AIS 1203Academic Inquiry and Scholarship3

Communication (6 semester credit hours)

Students must complete the following courses, for a total of 6 semester credit hours:

WRC 1013Freshman Composition I (Q)3
WRC 1023Freshman Composition II (Q)3

Mathematics (3 semester credit hours)

Students must complete one of the following courses, for a total of 3 semester credit hours:

MAT 1023College Algebra with Applications3
MAT 1033Algebra with Calculus for Business3
MAT 1043Introduction to Mathematics3
MAT 1073Algebra for Scientists and Engineers3
MAT 1093Precalculus3
MAT 1193Calculus for the Biosciences3
MAT 1214Calculus I4
STA 1053Basic Statistics3

Life and Physical Sciences (6 semester credit hours)

Students must complete two of the following courses for a total of 6 semester credit hours:

ANT 2033Introduction to Biological Anthropology3
AST 1013Introduction to Astronomy3
AST 1033Exploration of the Solar System3
BIO 1233Contemporary Biology I3
BIO 1243Contemporary Biology II3
BIO 1404Biosciences I4
BIO 1414Biosciences II4
ES 1113Environmental Botany3
ES 1123Environmental Zoology3
ES 1213Environmental Geology3
ES 2013Introduction to Environmental Science I3
ES 2023Introduction to Environmental Science II3
GEO 1013The Third Planet3
GEO 1123Life Through Time3
GES 2613Physical Geography3
PHY 1013Universes3
PHY 1943Physics for Scientists and Engineers I3
PHY 1963Physics for Scientists and Engineers II3

Language, Philosophy and Culture (3 semester credit hours)

Students must complete one of the following courses, for a total of 3 semester credit hours:

AAS 2013Introduction to African American Studies3
AAS 2113African American Culture, Leadership and Social Issues3
ANT 2063Language, Thought, and Culture3
ARA 1014Elementary Arabic I4
ARC 1113Introduction to the Built Environment3
ARC 1413Architecture and Culture3
CHN 1014Elementary Chinese I4
CLA 2013Introduction to Ancient Greece3
CLA 2023Introduction to Ancient Rome3
CLA 2323Classical Mythology3
CSH 1103Literary Masterpieces of Western Culture I3
CSH 1113Literary Masterpieces of Western Culture II3
CSH 1213Topics in World Cultures3
CSH 2113The Foreign Film3
ENG 2013Introduction to Literature3
ENG 2213Literary Criticism and Analysis3
ENG 2383Multiethnic Literatures of the United States3
ENG 2423Literature of Texas and the Southwest3
FRN 1014Elementary French I4
FRN 2333French Literature in English Translation3
GER 1014Elementary German I4
GER 2333German Literature in English Translation3
GLA 1013U.S. in the Global Arena3
GES 1023World Regional Geography3
GRK 1114Introductory Classical Greek I4
HIS 2123Introduction to World Civilization to the Fifteenth Century3
HIS 2133Introduction to World Civilization since the Fifteenth Century3
HIS 2533Introduction to Latin American Civilization3
HIS 2543Introduction to Islamic Civilization3
HIS 2553Introduction to East Asian Civilization3
HIS 2573Introduction to African Civilization3
HIS 2583Introduction to South Asian Civilization3
HUM 2093World Religions3
ITL 1014Elementary Italian I4
ITL 2333Italian Literature in English Translation3
JPN 1014Elementary Japanese I4
LAT 1114Introductory Latin I4
MAS 2013Introduction to Chicano(a) Studies3
PHI 1043Critical Thinking3
PHI 2023Introduction to Ancient Philosophy3
PHI 2033Introduction to Early Modern Philosophy3
PHI 2123Contemporary Moral Issues3
RUS 1014Elementary Russian I4
RUS 2333Russian Literature in English Translation3
SPN 1014Elementary Spanish I4
SPN 2333Hispanic Literature in English Translation3
WS 2013Introduction to Women’s Studies3
WS 2023Introduction to LGBTQ Studies3

Creative Arts (3 semester credit hours)

Students must complete one of the following courses, for a total of 3 semester credit hours:

AHC 1113Survey of Art and Architecture from Prehistoric Times to 13503
AHC 1123Survey of Art and Architecture in Europe and the New World from 1350 to 17503
AHC 1133Survey of Modern Art3
ARC 1213Design I3
ARC 1513Great Buildings and Cities of the World3
ART 1103Introduction to Visual Arts3
ART 1143Art for Non-Art Majors3
CLA 2033Introduction to Classical Literature3
DAN 2003Introduction to Dance3
ENG 1113Introduction to Creative Literary Arts3
HUM 2023Introduction to the Humanities I3
HUM 2033Introduction to the Humanities II3
HUM 2053History of Film3
MAS 2023Latino Cultural Expressions3
MUS 2243World Music in Society3
MUS 2623Fundamentals of Music for the Non-Music Major3
MUS 2633American Roots Music3
MUS 2663History and Styles of Jazz3
MUS 2673History and Styles of Rock3
MUS 2683Masterpieces of Music3
MUS 2693The Music of Latin America and the Caribbean3
MUS 2743Music and Film3
PHI 2073Philosophy of Art3

American History (6 semester credit hours)

Students must complete two of the following courses, for a total of 6 semester credit hours:

HIS 1043United States History: Pre-Columbus to Civil War Era3
HIS 1053United States History: Civil War Era to Present3
HIS 2053Texas History3

Government-Political Science (6 semester credit hours)

Students must complete two of the following courses, for a total of 6 semester credit hours:

POL 1013Introduction to American Politics3
and one of the following two courses:
POL 1133Texas Politics and Society3
POL 1213Civil Rights in Texas and America3

Social and Behavioral Sciences (3 semester credit hours)

Students must complete one of the following courses, for a total of 3 semester credit hours:

AMS 2043Approaches to American Culture3
ANT 1013Introduction to Anthropology3
ANT 2043Introduction to Archaeology3
ANT 2053Introduction to Cultural Anthropology3
BBL 2003Language, Culture, and Society3
BBL 2243Globalizing the Local: Bilingual Families, Communities, and Schools3
BIO 1033Drugs and Society3
CRJ 1113The American Criminal Justice System3
ECO 2003Economic Principles and Issues3
ECO 2023Introductory Microeconomics3
EGR 1343The Impact of Modern Technologies on Society3
GES 1013Fundamentals of Geography3
GES 2623Human Geography3
HTH 2413Introduction to Community and Public Health3
HTH 2513Personal Health3
IDS 2113Society and Social Issues3
PSY 1013Introduction to Psychology3
SOC 1013Introduction to Sociology3
SOC 2013Social Problems3
SOC 2023Social Context of Drug Use3

Component Area Option (CAO) (3 semester credit hours)

Students must complete either one of the following courses or any additional Core Curriculum course not previously used to satisfy a core component area requirement, for a total of 3 semester credit hours:

COM 2113Public Speaking3
CS 1173Data Analysis and Visualization3
EGR 1403Technical Communication3
ENG 2413Technical Writing3
PAD 1113Public Administration in American Society3
PHI 2043Introductory Logic3
Core Curriculum Component Area Requirements
First Year Experience Requirement 3
Communication 6
Mathematics 3
Life and Physical Sciences 6
Language, Philosophy and Culture 3
Creative Arts 3
American History 6
Government-Political Science 6
Social and Behavioral Sciences 3
Component Area Option 3
Total Credit Hours 42

Degree Requirements

A. 39 hours in the major
Courses must be selected in the following manner:
1. Required courses:12
Introduction to Political Science
Designing Research in Political Science
Quantitative Methods in Political Science
Seminar in Political Science
2. Gateway courses. Select two courses from the list below:6
Introduction to Global Affairs Studies
Introduction to Political Theory
Politics and the Administrative Process
Law and Society
Comparative Politics
3. Political science electives. 21 semester credit hours of upper-division electives, with at least 3 hours in each of the sub-fields below. Internship, Honors Thesis, and Study Abroad may count as upper-division political science electives:21
American Politics
Political Psychology
Women in Politics
Mass Media and Public Opinion
Participation and American National Elections
The American Presidency
Political Movements
Race, Ethnicity and Public Policy
The Supreme Court
Political Parties and Interest Groups
The Legislative Process
Urban Development: Politics Planning, and Power
Politics in Film
Experiments in Democratic Renewal
Politics of Federal Justice Policy Making
Politics of Congressional Elections
Campaign and Election Law
Immigration Law
Comparative Politics
Leadership and Elites
Latin American Politics
European Governments
Governments and Politics of Southeast Asia
Governments and Politics of East Asia
Politics of Mexico
Politics of the Third World
International Political Economy
Politics of the Middle East
The Welfare State in Comparative Perspective
Democracy and World Politics
Techniques in Global Analysis
International Politics
International Law
The United Nations
Diplomacy
Conflict, Law, and Security in Global Affairs
International Governance
International Human Rights
East European Politics
Geopolitics of Russia and Eurasia
International Political Economy
American Foreign Policy since World War II
International Organizations in World Politics
Force in International Politics
Current Issues in World Politics
Globalization
The Intelligence Community and World Affairs
Techniques in Global Analysis
Model UN
Study Abroad: Political Science
Political Theory
Contemporary Theories of Justice
American Political Thought
Political Philosophy: Ancient and Medieval
Political Philosophy: Modern
Political Philosophy: Contemporary
Justice and Social Policy
African American Political Thought
Justice among Nations
Politics and the Administrative Process or Public Law
Minorities and the Law
Constitutional Analysis l
Constitutional Analysis ll
Regulatory Law and Enterprise
Contracts
Great Controversies in Politics and Law
Torts
The American Legal Process
Judicial Politics
The Supreme Court
Constitutional Law I
Constitutional Law II
Urban Development: Politics Planning, and Power
Jurisprudence
Politics of Federal Justice Policy Making
Campaign and Election Law
Immigration Law
Legal and Philosophical Reasoning
Politics, Law, and Literature
Administrative Law
B. Electives
Select 39 semester credit hours of electives.39
Total Credit Hours78

Degree Requirements: B.A. Degree in Political Science - Social Studies Teaching Track

A. Required courses
Courses marked with an asterisk (*) may also be used to satisfy Core Curriculum requirements.
ECO 2003Economic Principles and Issues (*)3
GES 1013Fundamentals of Geography3
GES 1023World Regional Geography3
GES 2613Physical Geography (*)3
HIS 1043United States History: Pre-Columbus to Civil War Era (*)3
HIS 1053United States History: Civil War Era to Present (*)3
HIS 2053Texas History (*)3
HIS 2123Introduction to World Civilization to the Fifteenth Century (*)3
HIS 2133Introduction to World Civilization since the Fifteenth Century3
POL 1013Introduction to American Politics (*)3
POL 1133Texas Politics and Society (*)3
POL 4973Seminar in Political Science3
B. Upper-division History course
Select one course in U.S. history3
C. Geography
Select three courses from the list below:9
Geography of the United States and Canada
Geography of Latin America
Geography of Europe
Cultural Geography
Political Geography
D. Government Institutions
Select four courses from the list below:12
The American Legal Process (POL 3313 can substitute for POL 3013)
The American Presidency
Constitutional Law I
Political Parties and Interest Groups
American Foreign Policy since World War II
E. Upper-division Political Science courses
12 semester credit hours of upper-division POL courses12
F. Teacher Certification courses 30
Total Credit Hours102

Course Sequence Guide for B.A. Degree in Political Science

This course sequence guide is designed to assist students in completing their UTSA undergraduate Political Science degree requirements. This is merely a guide and students must satisfy other requirements of this catalog and meet with their academic advisor for individualized degree plans. Progress within this guide depends upon such factors as course availability, individual student academic preparation, student time management, work obligations, and individual financial considerations. Students may choose to take courses during Summer terms to reduce course loads during long semesters.

B.A. in Political Science – Four-Year Academic Plan

First Year
FallCredit Hours
AIS 1203Academic Inquiry and Scholarship (core) 3
HIS 1043, 1053, or 2053United States History: Pre-Columbus to Civil War Era, or United States History: Civil War Era to Present, or Texas History (core) 3
POL 1013Introduction to American Politics (core) 3
WRC 1013Freshman Composition I (Q) (core) 3
Mathematics core 3
Spring
WRC 1023Freshman Composition II (Q) (core) 3
HIS 1043, 1053, or 2053United States History: Pre-Columbus to Civil War Era, or United States History: Civil War Era to Present, or Texas History (core) 3
POL 1133 or 1213Texas Politics and Society (core) 3
Free elective 3
Life & Physical Sciences core 3
Second Year
Fall
POL 2503, 2513, 2603, 2623, or 2633Introduction to Political Theory (or Politics and the Administrative Process, or International Politics, or Law and Society, or Comparative Politics) 3
POL 2693Designing Research in Political Science 3
Social & Behavioral Sciences core 3
Life & Physical Sciences core 3
Creative Arts core 3
Spring
POL 2503, 2513, 2603, 2623, or 2633Introduction to Political Theory (or Politics and the Administrative Process, or International Politics, or Law and Society, or Comparative Politics) 3
POL 2533Introduction to Political Science 3
Free elective 3
Language, Philosophy & Culture core 3
Component Area Option core 3
Third Year
Fall
POL 2703Quantitative Methods in Political Science 3
Upper-division POL - American Politics 3
Free elective 3
Free elective 3
Upper-division free elective 3
Spring
POL elective 3
Free elective 3
Free elective 3
Upper-division free elective 3
Upper-division POL - Comparative Politics 3
Fourth Year
Fall
Upper-division free elective 3
Upper-division free elective 3
Upper-division POL elective 3
Upper-division POL - International Politics 3
Upper-division POL - Political Theory 3
Spring
POL 4973Seminar in Political Science 3
Free elective (to meet 120 hour minimum) 3
Upper-division free elective 3
Upper-division free elective 3
Upper-division POL - Public Administration/Law 3
 Total Credit Hours: 120.0

Bachelor of Arts Degree in Politics and Law

The minimum number of semester credit hours required for the Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree in Politics and Law, including the Core Curriculum requirements, is 120. Thirty-nine of the total semester credit hours required for the degree must be at the upper-division level.

All candidates for this degree must fulfill the Core Curriculum requirements and the degree requirements, which are listed below.

Core Curriculum Requirements (42 semester credit hours)

Students seeking the B.A. degree in Politics and Law must fulfill University Core Curriculum requirements in the same manner as other students. If courses are taken to satisfy both degree requirements and Core Curriculum requirements, then students may need to take additional courses in order to meet the minimum number of semester credit hours required for this degree.

For a complete listing of courses that satisfy the Core Curriculum requirements, see Core Curriculum Component Area Requirements.

Core Curriculum Component Area Requirements

First Year Experience Requirement (3 semester credit hours)

All students must complete the following course, for a total of 3 semester credit hours:

AIS 1203Academic Inquiry and Scholarship3

Communication (6 semester credit hours)

Students must complete the following courses, for a total of 6 semester credit hours:

WRC 1013Freshman Composition I (Q)3
WRC 1023Freshman Composition II (Q)3

Mathematics (3 semester credit hours)

Students must complete one of the following courses, for a total of 3 semester credit hours:

MAT 1023College Algebra with Applications3
MAT 1033Algebra with Calculus for Business3
MAT 1043Introduction to Mathematics3
MAT 1073Algebra for Scientists and Engineers3
MAT 1093Precalculus3
MAT 1193Calculus for the Biosciences3
MAT 1214Calculus I4
STA 1053Basic Statistics3

Life and Physical Sciences (6 semester credit hours)

Students must complete two of the following courses for a total of 6 semester credit hours:

ANT 2033Introduction to Biological Anthropology3
AST 1013Introduction to Astronomy3
AST 1033Exploration of the Solar System3
BIO 1233Contemporary Biology I3
BIO 1243Contemporary Biology II3
BIO 1404Biosciences I4
BIO 1414Biosciences II4
ES 1113Environmental Botany3
ES 1123Environmental Zoology3
ES 1213Environmental Geology3
ES 2013Introduction to Environmental Science I3
ES 2023Introduction to Environmental Science II3
GEO 1013The Third Planet3
GEO 1123Life Through Time3
GES 2613Physical Geography3
PHY 1013Universes3
PHY 1943Physics for Scientists and Engineers I3
PHY 1963Physics for Scientists and Engineers II3

Language, Philosophy and Culture (3 semester credit hours)

Students must complete one of the following courses, for a total of 3 semester credit hours:

AAS 2013Introduction to African American Studies3
AAS 2113African American Culture, Leadership and Social Issues3
ANT 2063Language, Thought, and Culture3
ARA 1014Elementary Arabic I4
ARC 1113Introduction to the Built Environment3
ARC 1413Architecture and Culture3
CHN 1014Elementary Chinese I4
CLA 2013Introduction to Ancient Greece3
CLA 2023Introduction to Ancient Rome3
CLA 2323Classical Mythology3
CSH 1103Literary Masterpieces of Western Culture I3
CSH 1113Literary Masterpieces of Western Culture II3
CSH 1213Topics in World Cultures3
CSH 2113The Foreign Film3
ENG 2013Introduction to Literature3
ENG 2213Literary Criticism and Analysis3
ENG 2383Multiethnic Literatures of the United States3
ENG 2423Literature of Texas and the Southwest3
FRN 1014Elementary French I4
FRN 2333French Literature in English Translation3
GER 1014Elementary German I4
GER 2333German Literature in English Translation3
GLA 1013U.S. in the Global Arena3
GES 1023World Regional Geography3
GRK 1114Introductory Classical Greek I4
HIS 2123Introduction to World Civilization to the Fifteenth Century3
HIS 2133Introduction to World Civilization since the Fifteenth Century3
HIS 2533Introduction to Latin American Civilization3
HIS 2543Introduction to Islamic Civilization3
HIS 2553Introduction to East Asian Civilization3
HIS 2573Introduction to African Civilization3
HIS 2583Introduction to South Asian Civilization3
HUM 2093World Religions3
ITL 1014Elementary Italian I4
ITL 2333Italian Literature in English Translation3
JPN 1014Elementary Japanese I4
LAT 1114Introductory Latin I4
MAS 2013Introduction to Chicano(a) Studies3
PHI 1043Critical Thinking3
PHI 2023Introduction to Ancient Philosophy3
PHI 2033Introduction to Early Modern Philosophy3
PHI 2123Contemporary Moral Issues3
RUS 1014Elementary Russian I4
RUS 2333Russian Literature in English Translation3
SPN 1014Elementary Spanish I4
SPN 2333Hispanic Literature in English Translation3
WS 2013Introduction to Women’s Studies3
WS 2023Introduction to LGBTQ Studies3

Creative Arts (3 semester credit hours)

Students must complete one of the following courses, for a total of 3 semester credit hours:

AHC 1113Survey of Art and Architecture from Prehistoric Times to 13503
AHC 1123Survey of Art and Architecture in Europe and the New World from 1350 to 17503
AHC 1133Survey of Modern Art3
ARC 1213Design I3
ARC 1513Great Buildings and Cities of the World3
ART 1103Introduction to Visual Arts3
ART 1143Art for Non-Art Majors3
CLA 2033Introduction to Classical Literature3
DAN 2003Introduction to Dance3
ENG 1113Introduction to Creative Literary Arts3
HUM 2023Introduction to the Humanities I3
HUM 2033Introduction to the Humanities II3
HUM 2053History of Film3
MAS 2023Latino Cultural Expressions3
MUS 2243World Music in Society3
MUS 2623Fundamentals of Music for the Non-Music Major3
MUS 2633American Roots Music3
MUS 2663History and Styles of Jazz3
MUS 2673History and Styles of Rock3
MUS 2683Masterpieces of Music3
MUS 2693The Music of Latin America and the Caribbean3
MUS 2743Music and Film3
PHI 2073Philosophy of Art3

American History (6 semester credit hours)

Students must complete two of the following courses, for a total of 6 semester credit hours:

HIS 1043United States History: Pre-Columbus to Civil War Era3
HIS 1053United States History: Civil War Era to Present3
HIS 2053Texas History3

Government-Political Science (6 semester credit hours)

Students must complete two of the following courses, for a total of 6 semester credit hours:

POL 1013Introduction to American Politics3
and one of the following two courses:
POL 1133Texas Politics and Society3
POL 1213Civil Rights in Texas and America3

Social and Behavioral Sciences (3 semester credit hours)

Students must complete one of the following courses, for a total of 3 semester credit hours:

AMS 2043Approaches to American Culture3
ANT 1013Introduction to Anthropology3
ANT 2043Introduction to Archaeology3
ANT 2053Introduction to Cultural Anthropology3
BBL 2003Language, Culture, and Society3
BBL 2243Globalizing the Local: Bilingual Families, Communities, and Schools3
BIO 1033Drugs and Society3
CRJ 1113The American Criminal Justice System3
ECO 2003Economic Principles and Issues3
ECO 2023Introductory Microeconomics3
EGR 1343The Impact of Modern Technologies on Society3
GES 1013Fundamentals of Geography3
GES 2623Human Geography3
HTH 2413Introduction to Community and Public Health3
HTH 2513Personal Health3
IDS 2113Society and Social Issues3
PSY 1013Introduction to Psychology3
SOC 1013Introduction to Sociology3
SOC 2013Social Problems3
SOC 2023Social Context of Drug Use3

Component Area Option (CAO) (3 semester credit hours)

Students must complete either one of the following courses or any additional Core Curriculum course not previously used to satisfy a core component area requirement, for a total of 3 semester credit hours:

COM 2113Public Speaking3
CS 1173Data Analysis and Visualization3
EGR 1403Technical Communication3
ENG 2413Technical Writing3
PAD 1113Public Administration in American Society3
PHI 2043Introductory Logic3
Core Curriculum Component Area Requirements
First Year Experience Requirement 3
Communication 6
Mathematics 3
Life and Physical Sciences 6
Language, Philosophy and Culture 3
Creative Arts 3
American History 6
Government-Political Science 6
Social and Behavioral Sciences 3
Component Area Option 3
Total Credit Hours 42

Degree Requirements

A. Courses in the major
39 semester hours in the major; 27 must be at the upper-division level. Courses must be selected in the following manner:
1. Two introductory courses selected from the following:6
Introduction to Legal Studies
Law and Society
Introduction to Political Theory
2. Required social science research methods course:3
Designing Research in Political Science
3. One writing course selected from the following:3
Legal Research and Writing
Writing Strategies for the Pre-law Student
4. Concentration electives. 18 semester credit hours of courses selected from the lists below with at least 12 hours taken in a single concentration:18
Law and Society Concentration
International Law
Theories of International Justice
Minorities and the Law
Judicial Politics
Jurisprudence
Issues in Law and Society
Legal and Philosophical Reasoning
Contemporary Theories of Justice
American Political Thought
Political Philosophy: Ancient and Medieval
Political Philosophy: Modern
Political Philosophy: Contemporary
Constitutional Law I
Constitutional Law II
Justice among Nations
Politics, Law, and Literature
Law and Governmental Affairs Concentration
International Organizations in World Politics
The American Legal Process
The Supreme Court
Constitutional Analysis l
Constitutional Analysis ll
Regulatory Law and Enterprise
Trial and Appellate Advocacy
State Courts: Judicial Decision-Making Practice and Procedure
Politics of Federal Justice Policy
Campaign and Election Law.
Immigration Law
Contracts
Issues in Law and Society
Torts
Federal Courts
Administrative Law
Justice and Social Policy
The Legislative Process
5. 6 semester credit hours of additional Politics and Law electives selected from the following list and chosen with consent of the advisor. POL 4933 Internship in Politics may be used to satisfy up to 6 hours of this requirement, if internship focuses on a law-related experience: 6
Political and Legal Anthropology
Business Law
Topics in Classical Genres
Topics in Classical History
Substantive Criminal Law
Constitutional Criminal Procedure
Economic Principles and Issues
Evolution of Economic Thought
Shakespeare: The Early Plays
Shakespeare: The Later Plays
History of the English Language
Environmental Law
International Law
International Governance
International Human Rights
Theories of International Justice
International Organizations in World Politics
Political Economy
United States Constitutional History
Law and American Development
Introduction to Public Policy
Introduction to Urban Management and Policy
Introduction to Nonprofit Agencies
Public and Nonprofit Financial Management
Managing Nonprofit Organizations
Introduction to Public Law
Minorities and the Law
Law School Studies
Judicial Politics
The Supreme Court
Constitutional Analysis l
Constitutional Analysis ll
Regulatory Law and Enterprise
Jurisprudence
Politics of Federal Justice Policy
Campaign and Election Law.
Immigration Law
Contracts
Politics of Federal Justice Policy
Issues in Law and Society
Legal and Philosophical Reasoning
Torts
Federal Courts
Administrative Law
Introductory Logic
Philosophy of Law
Ethics
Politics and the Administrative Process
American Political Thought
Political Philosophy: Ancient and Medieval
Political Philosophy: Modern
Political Philosophy: Contemporary
Justice and Social Policy
Constitutional Law I
Constitutional Law II
The Legislative Process
Justice among Nations
Politics, Law, and Literature
Internship in Political Science
6. Senior seminar3
Senior Seminar in Politics and Law
POL 4973 Seminar in Political Science or GLA 4973 Seminar in Global Affairs may be substituted with consent of the Undergraduate Advisor of Record, when covering relevant topics.
B. Electives
39 semester credit hours of electives.39
Total Credit Hours78

Course Sequence Guide for B.A. Degree in Politics and Law

This course sequence guide is designed to assist students in completing their UTSA undergraduate Politics and Law degree requirements. This is merely a guide and students must satisfy other requirements of this catalog and meet with their academic advisor for individualized degree plans. Progress within this guide depends upon such factors as course availability, individual student academic preparation, student time management, work obligations, and individual financial considerations. Students may choose to take courses during Summer terms to reduce course loads during long semesters.

B.A. in Politics and Law – Four-Year Academic Plan

First Year
FallCredit Hours
AIS 1203Academic Inquiry and Scholarship 3
HIS 1043, 1053, or 2053United States History: Pre-Columbus to Civil War Era 3
POL 1013Introduction to American Politics 3
WRC 1013Freshman Composition I (Q) 3
Mathematics core 3
Spring
HIS 1043, 1053, or 2053United States History: Pre-Columbus to Civil War Era 3
POL 1133 or 1213Texas Politics and Society 3
WRC 1023Freshman Composition II (Q) 3
Free elective 3
Life & Physical Sciences core 3
Second Year
Fall
PAL 2013Introduction to Legal Studies 3
Social & Behavioral Sciences core 3
Life & Physical Sciences core 3
Creative Arts core 3
Free Elective 3
Spring
PAL 2623 or POL 2503Law and Society 3
Language, Philosophy & Culture core 3
Component Area Option core 3
PAL concentration elective 3
Free elective 3
Third Year
Fall
POL 2693Designing Research in Political Science 3
PAL concentration elective 3
PAL concentration elective 3
Free elective 3
Free elective 3
Spring
PAL 3023 or WRC 3013Legal Research and Writing 3
PAL concentration elective 3
PAL concentration elective 3
PAL elective 3
Free elective 3
Fourth Year
Fall
PAL 4973Senior Seminar in Politics and Law 3
PAL concentration elective 3
PAL elective 3
Free elective 3
Free elective 3
Spring
Free elective 3
Free elective 3
Free elective 3
Free elective 3
Free elective 3
 Total Credit Hours: 120.0

Minor in Geography and Environmental Sustainability

All students pursuing the Minor in Geography must complete 18 semester credit hours.

A. Courses in core concepts and regions
GES 1013Fundamentals of Geography3
GES 1023World Regional Geography3
B. Upper-division regional geography
Select one of the following:3
Geography of the United States and Canada
Geography of Latin America
Geography of Europe
Geography of Mexico
Geography of Texas
Geopolitics of Russia and Eurasia
The Geography and Politics of the Asian Rim
C. Electives in geography
Select 9 semester credit hours of upper-division electives in geography9
Total Credit Hours18

To declare a Minor in Geography and Environmental Sustainability, obtain advice, or seek approval of substitutions for course requirements, students should consult their academic advisor.

Minor in Global Affairs

All students pursuing a Minor in Global Affairs must complete 18 semester credit hours, at least 12 of which must be at the upper-division level (3000- or 4000-level courses).

A. Two introductory courses on global affairs:6
U.S. in the Global Arena
and one of the following:
Introduction to Global Affairs Studies (POL 2603 can substitute for GLA 2603)
Comparative Politics
B. Select one of the following Research Methods courses3
Advanced Techniques in Global Affairs
Research Methods in Global Affairs
Designing Research in Political Science
Quantitative Methods in Political Science
C. Additional courses
Select 9 hours of 3000- or 4000-level GLA courses. Of these 9 hours, at least 3 hours in each of the three sections: Governance and Policy in Global Affairs, Regional Studies, and International Relations (in GLA major)9
No more than 6 semester credit hours selected from the following courses may be substituted for organized courses under section C with approval of the student’s academic advisor and Department Chair:
Study Abroad: Global Affairs
Independent Study
Internship in Global Affairs
Total Credit Hours18

Requests for substitutions require pre-approval of the student’s academic advisor, the supervising faculty member, and the Department Chair.

To declare a Minor in Global Affairs, obtain advice, or seek approval of substitutions for course requirements, students should consult with their academic advisor.

Minor in Latin American Studies

The Minor in Latin American Studies provides an interdisciplinary approach to understanding the political, cultural, historical, economical and societal processes and systems of the region.

All students pursuing a Minor in Latin American Studies must complete 18 semester credit hours. No more than five courses from one discipline.

A. Required course 3
Latin American Foundations
B. 15 hours of courses with Latin American content; 9 hours must be upper division
Select from the following:15
Arts of Ancient Mesoamerica
Latin American Art
Topics in Art History and Criticism (when topic includes Latin American content)
Civilizations of Mexico
Nature and Culture in Greater Amazonia
Archaeology of South America
Nature and Culture in Greater Amazonia
Indians of Mesoamerica
Field Course in Archaeology
Ancient Civilizations
Maya Civilization
Special Studies in Anthropology (when topic includes Latin American content)
Geography of Latin America
Geography of Mexico
Latin American Politics
Politics of Mexico
Latin America in the World
Topics in Latin American Security
Study Abroad: Global Affairs (when country includes Latin American country)
Introduction to Latin American Civilization
The Spanish and Mexican Borderlands
Colonial Texas under Spanish and Mexican Rule to 1836
Imperial Spain
History of Mexico
History of U.S. Relations with Latin America
Latin America since Independence
Revolution in Latin America
Pre-Hispanic and Colonial Latin America
Women and Gender in Latin America
Special Studies in History (when topic includes Latin American content)
The Music of Latin America and the Caribbean
Mexican Immigration and U.S. Society
Latin American Literature to Modernism
Latin American Literature since Modernism
Latin American Culture and Civilization
Topics in Hispanic Literatures
Topics in Hispanic Cultures
Total Credit Hours18

To declare a Minor in Latin American Studies, obtain advice, or seek approval of substitutions for course requirements, students should consult their academic advisor. Study Abroad courses to Latin American countries, or special study courses on Latin American topics may be used for either section A or B, see department for approval.

Minor in Political Science

All students pursuing the Minor in Political Science must complete 18 semester credit hours, 12 hours of which must be upper-division.

A. Lower-division courses
Select two of the following:6
Introduction to Global Affairs Studies
International Politics
Comparative Politics
Introduction to Political Theory
Politics and the Administrative Process
Introduction to Political Science
Law and Society
Quantitative Methods in Political Science
B. Upper-division courses
Select 12 upper-division semester credit hours. Students must take at least one upper-division class in three of the six subfields (see list of courses by subfield below):12
American Politics
Mexican American Politics
Political Psychology
Women in Politics
Mass Media and Public Opinion
Participation and American National Elections
The American Presidency
Political Movements
Race, Ethnicity and Public Policy
The Supreme Court
Political Parties and Interest Groups
The Legislative Process
Urban Development: Politics Planning, and Power
Politics in Film
Experiments in Democratic Renewal
Politics of Federal Justice Policy Making
Politics of Congressional Elections
Campaign and Election Law
Immigration Law
Comparative Politics
Latin American Politics
European Governments
Governments and Politics of Southeast Asia
Governments and Politics of East Asia
Politics of Mexico
International Political Economy
Politics of the Middle East
Democracy and World Politics
Advanced Techniques in Global Affairs
Conflict, Law, and Security in Global Affairs
Leadership and Elites
Politics of the Third World
The Welfare State in Comparative Perspective
International Politics
International Law
International Governance
International Human Rights
East European Politics
Geopolitics of Russia and Eurasia
International Political Economy
American Foreign Policy since World War II
International Organizations in World Politics
Force in International Politics
The United Nations
Diplomacy
Current Issues in World Politics
Globalization
The Intelligence Community and Global Affairs
Advanced Techniques in Global Affairs
Conflict, Law, and Security in Global Affairs
Model UN
Political Theory
Contemporary Theories of Justice
American Political Thought
Political Philosophy: Ancient and Medieval
Political Philosophy: Modern
Political Philosophy: Contemporary
Justice and Social Policy
African American Political Thought
Justice among Nations
Administrative Process
Urban Development: Politics Planning, and Power
Administrative Law
Public Law
The American Legal Process
Judicial Politics
The Supreme Court
Constitutional Law I
Constitutional Law II
Trial and Appellate Advocacy
Jurisprudence
Contracts
Politics of Federal Justice Policy Making
Campaign and Election Law
Immigration Law
Legal and Philosophical Reasoning
Politics, Law, and Literature
Administrative Law
Total Credit Hours18

Internship hours cannot count toward the minor.

To declare a Minor in Political Science, obtain advice, or seek approval of substitutions for course requirements, students should consult their academic advisor.

Minor in Politics and Law

All students pursuing a Minor in Politics and Law must complete 18 semester credit hours, at least 12 hours of which must be at the upper-division level.

A. 15 semester credit hours of required courses
Required introductory coursework:3
Law and Society
Introduction to Legal Studies
2. One writing course selected from the following:3
Legal Research and Writing
Writing Strategies for the Pre-law Student
3. Three upper-division concentration courses selected from the following:9
International Law
Theories of International Justice
Minorities and the Law
Law School Studies
Judicial Politics
The Supreme Court
Constitutional Analysis l
Constitutional Analysis ll
Regulatory Law and Enterprise
Trial and Appellate Advocacy
State Courts: Judicial Decision-Making Practice and Procedure
Jurisprudence
Politics of Federal Justice Policy
Immigration Law
Campaign and Election Law.
Contracts
Legal Analysis and Argumentation
Legal and Philosophical Reasoning
Torts
Federal Courts
Administrative Law
Internship in Politics and Law
American Political Thought
Constitutional Law I
Constitutional Law II
Politics, Law, and Literature
B. 3 additional semester credit hours selected from the following:3
Political and Legal Anthropology
Business Law
Topics in Classical Genres
Topics in Classical History
Substantive Criminal Law
Constitutional Criminal Procedure
Economic Principles and Issues
Evolution of Economic Thought
Shakespeare: The Early Plays
Shakespeare: The Later Plays
History of the English Language
Environmental Law
International Law
International Governance
International Human Rights
Theories of International Justice
International Organizations in World Politics
Political Economy
United States Constitutional History
Law and American Development
Introduction to Public Policy
Introduction to Urban Management and Policy
Introduction to Nonprofit Agencies
Public and Nonprofit Financial Management
Managing Nonprofit Organizations
Introduction to Public Law
Introductory Logic
Philosophy of Law
Ethics
The American Legal Process
Minorities and the Law
Law School Studies
Judicial Politics
The Supreme Court
Constitutional Analysis l
Constitutional Analysis ll
Regulatory Law and Enterprise
Politics of Federal Justice Policy
Jurisprudence
Campaign and Election Law.
Immigration Law
Contracts
Issues in Law and Society
Legal and Philosophical Reasoning
Legal Analysis and Argumentation
Torts
Federal Courts
Administrative Law
Politics and the Administrative Process
American Political Thought
Political Philosophy: Ancient and Medieval
Political Philosophy: Modern
Political Philosophy: Contemporary
Justice and Social Policy
Constitutional Law I
Constitutional Law II
The Legislative Process
Jurisprudence
Justice among Nations
Politics, Law, and Literature
Internship in Political Science
Total Credit Hours18

Geography and Environmental Sustainability (GES) Courses

GES 1013. Fundamentals of Geography. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours. (TCCN = GEOG 1300)

Introduction to the study of physical and cultural features of the earth and their distributions, causes, and consequences to humans. Topics include landforms, climate, natural resources, population, human behavior in spatial context, economic growth, urbanization, and political systems. May apply toward the Core Curriculum requirement in Social and Behavioral Sciences. (Formerly GRG 1013. Credit cannot be earned for both GRG 1013 and GES 1013.) Generally offered: Fall, Spring.

GES 1023. World Regional Geography. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours. (TCCN = GEOG 1303)

Study of the world’s regions, focusing on salient physical, cultural, economic, and political characteristics, including physiography, climate, natural resources, population, economic structure and development, globalization, urban growth, cultural institutions, and political structure. Regions include North America, Latin America, Europe, Middle East/North Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa, South Asia, Japan, China and East Asia, the Russian Federation, and Australasia. May apply toward the Core Curriculum requirement in Language, Philosophy and Culture. (Formerly GRG 1023. Credit cannot be earned for both GRG 1023 and GES 1023.) Generally offered: Fall, Spring, Summer.

GES 2613. Physical Geography. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours. (TCCN = GEOG 1301)

Study of the earth’s major landforms and climatic patterns, the processes giving rise to these patterns, and their relationship to human activity. Includes the geomorphology of volcanoes, glaciers, coral reefs, mountains, caves, dunes, and plate tectonics; weather and climate; and the relationship of these agents to physical and human landscapes. May apply towards the Core Curriculum requirement in Life and Physical Sciences. (Formerly GRG 2613. Credit cannot be earned for both GRG 2613 and GES 2613.) Generally offered: Fall, Spring, Summer.

GES 2623. Human Geography. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours. (TCCN = GEOG 1302)

An introduction to the study of human patterns and behaviors across the globe. Topics include population and migration; language, religion, gender, and ethnicity; political geography; development; economic geography; urban patterns; and resource issues. May apply towards the Core Curriculum requirement in Social and Behavioral Sciences. (Formerly GRG 2623. Credit cannot be earned for both GRG 2623 and GES 2623.) Generally offered: Fall.

GES 3003. Global Sustainability. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

This course introduces the student to the concepts, principles, and practices of sustainability in the context of physical and human geography. It focuses on key knowledge areas including environmental and ecosystem change; water, food, and energy resources; urban and economic development; social equity; and cultural preservation. The course will help the student respond to critical global challenges such as climate change, natural disasters, food shortages, environmental degradation, and social inequalities.

GES 3113. Geography of the United States and Canada. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Study of selected geographic aspects of the major regions of the United States and Canada, emphasizing current social and economic issues in these regions. From a contextualizing treatment of the continent’s physical geographies, the course proceeds to the social geographies of the major ethnic groups, showing how the historical management and appropriation of space has been integral to determining the character of the contemporary social hierarchy at the national level. The course proceeds through analyses of social and economic patterns of development, including the national and internal geographical patterns of North American cities. (Formerly GRG 3113. Credit cannot be earned for both GRG 3113 and GES 3113.).

GES 3123. Geography of Latin America. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Beginning with basic aspects of the physical environment, the course examines the social geographies of pre-colonial and colonial Latin America. The structural factors of Latin American economies and cultural institutions are then examined. Emphasis is on their spatial manifestations and their role in producing a Latin America often termed "underdeveloped." The emerging role of Latin America in the democratic world order of the post-1990s is also examined. (Formerly GRG 3123. Credit cannot be earned for both GRG 3123 and GES 3123.).

GES 3133. Geography of Europe. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Survey of the European culture area, including Western Europe, Eastern Europe, and the Baltics. Discussion of historical, urban, political, ethnic, and economic forces shaping the 21st-century geography of Europe, including the European Union and the Russian Federation. (Formerly GRG 3133. Credit cannot be earned for both GRG 3133 and GES 3133.) Generally offered: Spring.

GES 3143. Geography of Mexico. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Investigation of Mexico’s physical and social geography, including climatic and geomorphologic influences, the historical imprint of the Amerindians and the Spanish, population growth and migration, urbanization, political reform, social and cultural change, agriculture and industry, trade liberalization and the impact of NAFTA. (Formerly GRG 3143. Credit cannot be earned for both GRG 3143 and GES 3143.).

GES 3153. Geography of Texas. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

A topical and regional examination of the physical, historical, cultural, and economic patterns of the state. Includes demographic characteristics, agriculture, mining, manufacturing, and selected urban areas. The role of historical and political forces in creating social inequities in contemporary Texas are examined in detail, including environmental degradation, rural health, higher education, and patterns of wealth and economic growth. May include a field trip to the nonmetropolitan hinterland of San Antonio. (Formerly GRG 3153. Credit cannot be earned for both GRG 3153 and GES 3153.).

GES 3166. Physical and Cultural Geography of the American Southwest. (6-0) 6 Credit Hours.

An immersion in the geography of the U.S. Southwest. Includes both classroom and field components. Illustrates how the principles of physical and cultural geography play out in landscapes of the Southwest. Students will visit sites, keep field logs, and make student presentations. The one-week field portion includes travel in vans to areas that may include West Texas and New Mexico in addition to adjacent Colorado, Arizona, and Utah. Students will stay in campgrounds and walk into historic and natural sites. (Formerly GRG 3166. Credit cannot be earned for both GRG 3166 and GES 3166.).

GES 3213. Cultural Geography. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

A thematic exploration of the nature and distribution of human culture hearths, population, folk culture, popular culture, agriculture, industrialization, languages, and religion. Topics are defined and examined in the context of their manifestations and influences as regions, cultural diffusion, ecology, cultural interaction, and landscapes. (Formerly GRG 3213. Credit cannot be earned for both GRG 3213 and GES 3213.) Generally offered: Fall.

GES 3223. Revealing Geography through Film and Pop Culture. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

This course explores global geographic issues by means of contemporary cinema, elaborated upon in selected readings. By the use of film, the course immerses the student in the socio-cultural, geo-political, economic, and environmental dimensions of the contemporary world. It examines places and people that are often marginalized, such as certain ethnic and racial groups, women, and the economically disadvantaged.

GES 3314. Introduction to Geographic Information Systems. (3-2) 4 Credit Hours.

An introductory course on the application of the computer to the acquisition, manipulation, analysis, and display of geographic data; and an overview of projection systems, data acquisition issues, and presentation techniques. Three lecture and two laboratory hours per week. (Formerly GRG 3313 and GRG 3314. Credit cannot be earned for GRG 3314 or GRG 3313 and GES 3314.) Generally offered: Fall.

GES 3323. Spatial Analysis. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Conceptualization, operationalization, and analysis of relationships in geography and the social sciences. Includes the scientific method, research design, sampling, interpretation of spatial patterns, statistics, and univariate and multivariate analysis. Involves use of computer software in the analysis and display of data. Students will have the opportunity to explore their own interests within the course. (Formerly GRG 3323. Credit cannot be earned for both GRG 3323 and GES 3323.) Generally offered: Spring.

GES 3334. Advanced Geographic Information Systems. (3-2) 4 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: GES 3314. Advanced topics in the use of computer-based analysis of geographic information including data acquisition, modeling complex datasets, and an introduction to scripting to customize an industry-standard software package. Three lecture and two laboratory hours per week. (Formerly GRG 3333 and GRG 3334. Credit cannot be earned for GRG 3333 or GRG 3334 and GES 3334.).

GES 3343. Analytical and Computer Cartography. (2-2) 3 Credit Hours.

The design, construction, production, and reproduction of maps using computer hardware and software. Topics may include cartographic theory, principles of visual communication, and the techniques of geographic visualization, including 3-D and 4-D modeling and animation. (Formerly GRG 3343. Credit cannot be earned for both GRG 3343 and GES 3343.).

GES 3413. Geography of the Middle East and North Africa. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

An analysis of the states spanning the Maghreb from Morocco to Libya; Egypt; and the Middle East from Turkey and the Arabian Peninsula to Pakistan. Examination of the region’s physical and social geography and its political and economic dynamics from early history to modern times. (Formerly GRG 3413. Credit cannot be earned for both GRG 3413 and GES 3413).

GES 3423. Geopolitics of Russia and Eurasia. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Multidisciplinary introduction and regional study of the Russian Federation and the Eurasian realm, including the Caucasus, Central Asian nations, Afghanistan, and Mongolia. Both the geography and the politics of this area will be analyzed. Historical and contemporary geopolitical topics include nation-building, regional civilizations, revolution, terrorism, the 19th-century "Great Game," the rise of the USSR, and the current transition of the Russian Federation to an uncertain future. (Same as GLA 3423 and POL 3423. Formerly GRG 3423. Credit cannot be earned for more than one of the following: GLA 3423, GRG 3423, POL 3423, or GES 3423.).

GES 3433. The Geography and Politics of the Asian Rim. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

An analysis of the states spanning from the Indian subcontinent through Indo-China to Japan and China. Examination of their physical and social geographies and the regional political dynamics prevalent in the modern era. Selected themes will include population dynamics, cultural hearths, immigration patterns, economic development, and regional integration. (Formerly GRG 3433. Credit cannot be earned for both GRG 3433 and GES 3433.).

GES 3443. Medical Geography. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

The human ecology of health and disease. Topics may include analysis of the cultural/ environmental interactions that explain world patterns of disease; the diffusion and treatment of infectious disease; maps and GIS in medical geography; the ecology of non-communicable diseases; and health care promotion and delivery. (Formerly GRG 3443. Credit cannot be earned for both GRG 3443 and GES 3443.).

GES 3453. Population Geography. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Study of the spatial dimensions of population distribution, growth, and mobility. Includes the historical and modern reasons for global patterns of population, changes in birth and death rates over time, and levels of development as explained by the demographic transition and population policies. Special attention will be given to human migration theories, models, and case studies at the intra-urban, internal, and international levels. Global issues related to population growth and movement such as political conflict and governance, disease, and immigration policy will be covered. (Formerly GRG 3453. Credit cannot be earned for both GRG 3453 and GES 3453.).

GES 3463. Geography of Tourism. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Introduces the principles and practices of global tourism, including its geographic diversity and the connections between tourist origins and destinations. Discusses the economic importance and dimensions of tourism and the social, economic, and environmental impacts it has on host societies. (Formerly GRG 3463. Credit cannot be earned for both GRG 3463 and GES 3463.).

GES 3513. Urban Geography. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

A geographic examination of the environmental settings and impacts, history, structure, growth, area of influence, economic base, social structure, and culture of cities. Topics may include the physiography and climate of cities, preindustrial and industrial cities in history, factors that influence the growth and decline of cities, urbanization, the rise of global cities, the imagined city, cities as urban service centers, urban cultural diversity, social area analysis, and urban cultural conflicts. Focus of the course may be local, national, or international. (Formerly GRG 3513. Credit cannot be earned for both GRG 3513 and GES 3513.) Generally offered: Fall.

GES 3523. Introduction to Urban Planning. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

An introduction to urban public policy, urban dynamics, selected problems of cities, and the role of the master planning process in their management and solution. Issues and themes may include, urban growth and sustainability; municipal and regional government including zoning and subdivision regulations; planning and law; energy and waste management; historic preservation and urban design; and relationships between transportation and land use. (Formerly GRG 3523. Credit cannot be earned for both GRG 3523 and GES 3523.).

GES 3533. Geography of Local Economic Activity. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Investigates the location of agricultural, industrial, retail and service activities, and transportation flows at the scale of town and community, through relevant theories and models. Includes case studies of agricultural land use around cities, the community economic base, global impacts on the local economy, and central place principles of threshold, range, primacy, and hierarchy. Students will apply these concepts and models to local communities.

GES 3543. Behavioral Geography. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Study of human spatial perception and behavior as a function of the social, built, and natural environments. Topics include the formation of beliefs and attitudes toward places and peoples; how humans lay claim to and defend proximal spaces and territories; perception of the physical environment; the diffusion of technologies, ideas, people, and diseases over space; and the causes and effects of contemporary human migrations. Students will directly observe human personal space defense in the field, and present their observations in written and/or verbal form.

GES 3563. Urban Development: Politics, Planning and Power. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. An opportunity to pursue a political, economic, and geographic analysis of the dynamics of growth and change in the modern metropolis, focusing on the problems and conflicts stemming from urban growth and stagnation. Topics examined may include uneven development, planning, industrial development policy, taxation, and intergovernmental rivalry. Case studies may be drawn from the Austin-San Antonio region as well as from societies other than the United States (Same as POL 3413. Credit cannot earned for both GES 3563 and POL 3413.).

GES 3613. Conservation of Resources. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

A survey of natural resources, environmental policies, global consumption patterns, and the competing values that affect them. Topics include agriculture, water resources, air pollution, waste disposal, land management, wildlife preservation, habitat conservation, biodiversity, energy production, urban sprawl, economic growth, and other selected components of built and natural systems. (Formerly GRG 3613. Credit cannot be earned for both GRG 3613 and GES 3613.) Generally offered: Fall.

GES 3623. Geography of Natural Hazards. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

This course introduces students to the geophysical phenomena that are the root causes of natural disasters, as well as the social institutions and human geographies that exacerbate them. Hazards covered in this class may include earthquakes, tsunamis, volcanic eruptions, hurricanes, tornados, floods, drought, wildfire, and global climate. (Formerly GRG 3623. Credit cannot be earned for both GRG 3623 and GES 3623.).

GES 3633. Geography of Globalization and Development. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Survey and analysis of economic growth and social change in different parts of the world, with an emphasis on less-developed countries. Topics may include defining development, modernization and neo-liberalism, structuralism and post-development, major theories of development and underdevelopment, poverty and inequality, sustainable and grassroots development, cultural globalization, and hyper-urbanization. (Formerly GRG 3633. Credit cannot be earned for both GRG 3633 and GES 3633.).

GES 3643. Political Geography. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Investigates the role of the political state in society and the evolution of state organization from classical times to the present. Topics may include centrifugal and centripetal forces, geopolitics, territorial morphology, boundaries, core areas, emerging supranationalism, and the spatial and political problematics associated with the globalization of capitalist exchange. (Formerly GRG 3643. Credit cannot be earned for both GRG 3643 and GES 3643.).

GES 3653. Gender and Cities: An Introduction to Feminist Geography. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

The course studies the role of women in the spatial organization of society. Topics may include analysis of gendered spaces, the importance of gender relations in shaping physical, social, and built environments, and the spatial-economic consequences of gender-based policies. In addition to the role of gender, this course explores the roles of race, religion, disability, and sexual orientation in shaping the urban environment. (Formerly GRG 3653. Credit cannot be earned for both GRG 3653 and GES 3653.) Generally offered: Spring.

GES 3663. Urban Sustainability in Global Context. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

This course explores the challenges of achieving environmentally and socially sustainable communities, neighborhoods, and cities. It investigates how and in what contexts we can move towards urban ecological integrity, economic security, empowerment, social responsibility and social well-being as exemplified by sustainable communities globally. Students will be introduced to the concepts, theories, tools, and techniques of this vibrant, emerging field.

GES 3673. Space and Identity Crisis in the Postmodern Era. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the growing crisis of personal and collective identity as a consequence of the globalization of capitalist exchange. The human need for ‘belonging’ to different social communities at different spatial, social, and cultural levels is challenged by rapid changes in economic production, technology and the corresponding integration with formerly external areas. Common manifestations of these processes are expressed through supranationalism (EC, NAFTA, etc.), gentrification, ‘anti-immigrationism’, the renewal of recently tainted racial, ethnic, and gender conceptions, amongst others. This course reveals the systemic underpinnings to growing sectarian strife at the local and international level.

GES 3713. Weather and Climate. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Analysis of the elements and causes of daily weather, climatic classifications, and climate change. Study of world distributions and components of climate, air pressure, precipitation, air masses, optical phenomena, and wave cyclones. Regional attention to weather patterns, including tornadoes and hurricanes. (Formerly GRG 3713. Credit cannot be earned for both GRG 3713 and GES 3713.) Generally offered: Fall.

GES 3723. Physiography. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides a study of landforms, the description and interpretation of relief features of the surface of the earth, and the processes and materials that form and change them over time. Students will be introduced to the impacts of human intervention in landscape-shaping processes. Emphasis will be placed on the landforms of a selected region, such as the Southwestern United States. (Formerly GRG 3723. Credit cannot be earned for both GRG 3723 and GES 3723.).

GES 3733. Urban and Regional Analysis. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Applied models of urban and regional growth, structure, interaction, influence, and inequality over space, with emphasis on the United States. The course introduces the student to theories and concepts of urban and regional development, stressing practical skills for analyzing social, political, economic, and demographic characteristics of the urban scene, with an emphasis on sustainable development. (Formerly GRG 3733. Credit cannot be earned for both GRG 3733 and GES 3733.).

GES 3743. Biogeography. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

The study of the distribution of species and ecosystems in geographic space and over time. Topics may include the prehistoric and historic diffusion of plant and animal species, the global distribution of flora, fauna and soils, the impacts of plants and animals on settlement and globalization, and the consequences of human activity for the biosphere. (Formerly GRG 3743. Credit cannot be earned for both GRG 3743 and GES 3743.).

GES 3753. Climate Change. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Examines changes in climatic systems over both short and long time periods, their physical and human causes, and their impacts on physical and ecological systems. Discusses past, present, and future changes in climatic conditions and the methods used to evaluate changes in temperature, precipitation, and other climatic indicators. (Formerly GRG 3753. Credit cannot be earned for both GRG 3753 and GES 3753.).

GES 4853. Study Abroad: Geography and Environmental Sustainability. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. A seminar course associated with a study abroad program exploring global perspectives in geography and environmental sustainability. Involves international travel and field trips. May be repeated for credit depending on host country/destination.

GES 4856. Study Abroad: Geography and Environmental Sustainability. (6-0) 6 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. A seminar course associated with a study abroad program exploring global perspectives in geography and environmental sustainability. Involves international travel and field trips. May be repeated for credit depending on host country/destination.

GES 4911. Independent Study. (0-0) 1 Credit Hour.

Prerequisites: Permission in writing (form available) of the instructor, the student’s advisor, the Department Chair, and the Dean of the College in which the course is offered. Independent reading, research, discussion, and/or writing under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated for credit, but not more than 6 semester credit hours of independent study, regardless of discipline, will apply to a bachelor’s degree. (Formerly GRG 4911).

GES 4912. Independent Study. (0-0) 2 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: Permission in writing (form available) of the instructor, the student’s advisor, the Department Chair, and the Dean of the College in which the course is offered. Independent reading, research, discussion, and/or writing under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated for credit, but not more than 6 semester credit hours of independent study, regardless of discipline, will apply to a bachelor’s degree. (Formerly GRG 4912).

GES 4913. Independent Study. (0-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: Permission in writing (form available) of the instructor, the student’s advisor, the Department Chair, and the Dean of the College in which the course is offered. Independent reading, research, discussion, and/or writing under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated for credit, but not more than 6 semester credit hours of independent study, regardless of discipline, will apply to a bachelor’s degree. (Formerly GRG 4913).

GES 4923. Advanced Research Tutorial. (0-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: Permission in writing (form available) of the instructor, the student's advisor and the Department Chair. The tutorial provides students with the opportunity to serve as an apprentice to a professor in order to learn the process of academic research. The student would engage in all aspects of the professor’s research project, potentially including data collection, report writing, joint paper presentations or publications, providing ideal preparation for graduate school. (Formerly GRG 4923. Credit cannot be earned for both GRG 4923 and GES 4923.).

GES 4933. Internship in Geography. (0-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: Consent of internship coordinator and faculty supervisor. Supervised experience relevant to geography within selected community organizations. A maximum of 6 semester credit hours may be earned through the internship. (Formerly GRG 4933).

GES 4936. Internship in Geography. (0-0) 6 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: Consent of internship coordinator and faculty supervisor. Supervised experience relevant to geography within selected community organizations. A maximum of 6 semester credit hours may be earned through the internship. (Formerly GRG 4936. Credit cannot be earned for both GRG 4936 and GES 4936.).

GES 4953. Special Studies in Geography. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

An organized course offering the opportunity for specialized study not normally or not often available as part of the regular course offerings. Special Studies may be repeated for credit when topics vary, but not more than 6 semester credit hours, regardless of discipline, will apply to a bachelor’s degree. (Formerly GRG 4953).

GES 4983. Research Practicum. (0-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: Permission in writing (form available) of the instructor, the student’s advisor and the Department Chair. The practicum provides students with the opportunity to focus on a specific research issue having practical applications in geography. Students participate in a hands-on research experience in a collective research environment. Potential practicum activities could be related but not limited to the GIS Lab. (Formerly GRG 4983. Credit cannot be earned for both GRG 4983 and GES 4983.).

GES 4993. Honors Thesis. (0-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade point average of 3.0 at UTSA, a 3.5 grade point average in the major, and recommendation by a member of the Political Science and Geography faculty. Supervised research and preparation of an honors thesis. May be repeated once with advisor’s approval. Students who are approved will enroll in the appropriate honors thesis courses during their final two semesters at UTSA. To earn honors, the thesis must be passed by an Honors Committee that will be formed with the recommending faculty and another faculty member. Students interested in enrolling should contact the Department Undergraduate Advisor of Record for additional information. (Formerly GRG 4993).

Global Affairs (GLA) Courses

GLA 1013. U.S. in the Global Arena. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

This course assists students in understanding the context in which United States interacts with the rest of the world and the mutual effects of that relationship. It traces the history and evolution of the United States’ involvement in global affairs and why and how what happens in the world matters for the U.S. and vice-versa. Issues to be discussed may include globalization, low politics, international banking, multinationals, health issues, the environment, terrorism, security, food, technology, international communication, and other intermestic issues. May be applied toward the Core Curriculum requirement in Language, Philosophy and Culture. Generally offered: Fall, Spring.

GLA 2603. Introduction to Global Affairs Studies. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: GLA 1013 or POL 1013. This course offers an opportunity for broad study of issues such as North-South and East-West conflicts; international aid and trade through transnational enterprises; economic development and debt; military conflicts and nuclear weapons; new frontiers of oceanic resources, tropical forests, and space; cross-cultural communications; American and foreign values; language issues; and investigations of issues related to a particular nation and culture.

GLA 2633. Comparative Politics. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: GLA 1013 or POL 1013. A comparative examination of the diverse forms, goals, styles, and practices of government in democratic and authoritarian states. Several major polities will be studied in detail. (Same as POL 2633. Credit cannot be earned for both GLA 2633 and POL 2633.).

GLA 3003. International Law. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: GLA 1013 or POL 1013. This course evaluates the ways that international law affects world politics. Emphasis is on the foundations and substantive rules of international law and national politics. Topics may include the laws of war, war crimes, terrorism, human rights, economic exchange and natural resources.

GLA 3033. International Governance. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: GLA 1013 or POL 1013. International law, organizations, regimes, hierarchies, and norms such as sovereignty govern the international system. These factors help create a world order that limits armed conflict, regulates the world economy, advances environmental protection, and sets human rights standards. This course explains theories of international governance, and compares these perspectives to the analysis of political scientists on the past record and likely future of world order. (Same as POL 3033. Credit cannot be earned for both GLA 3033 and POL 3033.).

GLA 3043. International Human Rights. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: GLA 1013 or POL 1013. This course explores the philosophical and political meaning of fundamental human rights; cases of human rights violations (such as genocide in the Holocaust, Rwanda, Kosovo, and Cambodia; the death penalty; female genital mutilation; violations of workers’ rights; and torture); and the role that states, international organizations and individuals can play in ending human rights abuses. Course readings may include contemporary theories of human rights and case studies on the enforcement of rights around the world. (Same as POL 3043. Credit cannot be earned for both GLA 3043 and POL 3043.).

GLA 3103. Research Methods in Global Affairs. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: GLA 1013 or POL 1013. This course introduces students to a range of methodological approaches relevant to studies of global problems and international relations. Students will study relevant background debates in the philosophy of the social sciences, consider examples of contemporary research designs associated with global problems and international relations, and learn how to craft research questions that address real world challenges. Course may include a range of methodological approaches including quantitative methods (e.g. measures of central tendency and dispersion, regression, and problems of description and inference, etc.), qualitative methods (e.g. comparative case studies, content analysis, and discourse analysis, etc.). Course may require the use of standard computer packages and secondary analysis of data.

GLA 3213. Theories of International Relations. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: GLA 1013 or POL 1013. This course provides an overview of theoretical debates and conceptual frameworks for the study of international relations. It examines a range of theoretical models important to explaining how the world works including but not limited to, classical and structural realism, liberalism, global society/complex interdependence/liberal institutionalism, Marxism/dependency, constructivism, and critical theories including feminism and post-modernism. The course also may introduce frameworks for the study of foreign policy decision making such as bureaucratic and organizational politics, and small group politics.

GLA 3233. Theories of International Justice. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: GLA 1013 or POL 1013. This course explores the nature of justice in a globalized political world. It raises questions such as whether a single standard of justice (e.g., human rights) can legitimately be applied to all cultures across the world, and examines the nature of our obligations to individuals in other countries given the economic and political interdependency of all peoples. Some attention may also be given to particular topics such as immigration policy and the use of foreign military intervention for humanitarian purposes.

GLA 3383. East European Politics. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: GLA 1013 or POL 1013. This course provides an overview of politics in Eastern Europe broadly understood as the region of East Central and Southeastern Europe, and the post-Soviet space. It traces the evolution of nation building since the interwar period and the system of communist rule, with a focus on key dimensions of the post-communist transformation of the region. Thematic coverage may include constitutions, political culture, party politics, and Euro-Atlantic integration. (Same as POL 3383. Credit cannot be earned for both GLA 3383 and POL 3383.).

GLA 3393. Latin American Politics. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: GLA 1013 or POL 1013. An examination of political institutions and their relationship to social and economic change in Latin America. Profiles of major Latin American countries, such as Mexico, Brazil, Argentina, Peru, and Cuba. (Same as POL 3393. Credit cannot be earned for both GLA 3393 and POL 3393.).

GLA 3403. European Governments. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: GLA 1013 or POL 1013. The interplay of politics with the changing social and economic environment in the advanced industrial societies of Western Europe. Elites, participation, governmental structures, party systems, interest groups, and public policy will be examined in several selected polities and the European Union. (Same as POL 3403. Credit cannot be earned for both GLA 3403 and POL 3403.).

GLA 3423. Geopolitics of Russia and Eurasia. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Multidisciplinary introduction and regional study of the Russian Federation and the Eurasian realm, including the Caucasus, Central Asian nations, Afghanistan, and Mongolia. Both the geography and the politics of this area will be analyzed. Historical and contemporary geopolitical topics include nation-building, regional civilizations, revolution, terrorism, the 19th-century "Great Game," the rise of the USSR, and the current transition of the Russian Federation to an uncertain future. (Same as GES 3423 and POL 3423. Credit cannot be earned for more than one of the following: GLA 3423, GES 3423, GRG 3423, or POL 3423.).

GLA 3433. Governments and Politics of Southeast Asia. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: GLA 1013 or POL 1013. A comparative examination of the political systems of selected Southeast Asian countries and their efforts to deal with political, economic, and social change. Countries studied may include Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, and Vietnam. (Same as POL 3433. Credit cannot be earned for both GLA 3433 and POL 3433.).

GLA 3443. Governments and Politics of East Asia. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: GLA 1013 or POL 1013. A comparative examination of the political systems of selected East Asian countries and their efforts to deal with problems of political, economic, and social change. Countries studied may include the People’s Republic of China, the Republic of China, and South Korea. (Same as POL 3443. Credit cannot be earned for both GLA 3443 and POL 3443.).

GLA 3453. Politics of Mexico. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: GLA 1013 or POL 1013. Background to the contemporary political system of Mexico, including independence, foreign intervention, the Diaz regime, and the 1910–1917 revolution. Other topics may include the constitution, the structure of government, political parties, the presidency, economic development and policy, contemporary leadership, and elites. (Same as POL 3453. Credit cannot be earned for both GLA 3453 and POL 3453.).

GLA 3463. Politics of the Third World. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: GLA 1013 or POL 1013. The political system of various Third World nations. An inquiry into the political and economic problems of these countries, such as development, instability, and political change. (Same as POL 3463. Credit cannot be earned for both GLA 3463 and POL 3463.).

GLA 3473. Latin America in the World. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013 or consent of instructor. Advanced survey of major theories and problems in Latin American political and economic development. Theories of dependency, corporatism, bureaucratic authoritarianism, and transitions of democracy. Selected problems such as political stability, land reform, economic integration, multinational corporations, inflation, foreign debt, revolution and reform, and the military in politics. (Same as POL 3473. Credit cannot be earned for both GLA 3473 and POL 3473.).

GLA 3483. International Political Economy. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: GLA 1013 or POL 1013. This course is an introduction to the institutions and policies that govern international economic relations. Students will study the development of the international economic system as well as controversies over money, trade, and governance. (Same as POL 3483. Credit cannot be earned for both GLA 3483 and POL 3483.).

GLA 3493. Politics of the Middle East. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: GLA 1013 or POL 1013. An examination of the past, present, and future of Middle East politics, with an emphasis on culture, politics, religion, and conflicts in the area; the international relations of Middle Eastern countries as well as superpowers’ involvement. (Same as POL 3493. Credit cannot be earned for both GLA 3493 and POL 3493.).

GLA 3503. American Foreign Policy since World War II. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: GLA 1013 or POL 1013. Major private interests and public institutions involved in American foreign policy making; public opinion and foreign involvement; specific policies toward international organizations and major world regions. (Same as POL 3503. Credit cannot be earned for both GLA 3503 and POL 3503.).

GLA 3513. International Organizations in World Politics. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: GLA 1013 or POL 1013. Major issues involving international organizations: nationalism and globalism, financing problems, international staffing, voting patterns, peace-keeping, and international conferences. Organizations examined include the United Nations system, regional development banks, alliance systems, cartels, and common markets. (Same as POL 3513. Credit cannot be earned for both GLA 3513 and POL 3513.).

GLA 3523. Force in International Politics. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. This course engages with experiences of violence in IR. It provides an examination of modern research into the use of coercion in international relations with a focus on economic sanctions, war, and terrorism. Special emphasis will be placed on the causes, trends, and consequences of interstate wars. Topics may include armed conflict, trauma and suffering, laws of war, representation of war in media, peace movements, and the technologies of peace making. (Same as POL 3523. Credit cannot be earned for both POL 3523 and GLA 3523).

GLA 3533. The United Nations. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: GLA 1013 or POL 1013. The course introduces students to the organization's history, structure, operations, and role in the international system. It examines the historical context of the UN's founding and its functions, processes of institutional reform and change, as well as the successes and failures of the organization, in order to understand the UN's role in contemporary world politics. Topics may include the integration of new issues beyond its traditional focus on peace and security, as well as of new actors, such as nongovernmental organizations and multinational enterprises.

GLA 3543. Diplomacy. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: GLA 1013 or POL 1013. The course explores the impact of modern diplomacy on global affairs through the conduct of foreign policy and external representation. It highlights the historical and theoretical settings of international negotiations, treaties, alliances, agreements, and the practical ways in which foreign policy is implemented. Topics may include classical diplomacy, international business diplomacy, public diplomacy, multilateral diplomacy, and case studies that examine the complexity and build skills for dealing with global issues.

GLA 3563. Current Issues in World Politics. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: GLA 1013 or POL 1013. An examination of the issues that divide the people of the world. The structure of contemporary world problems will be studied and possible strategies for the reduction of international conflict will be assessed. Topics may include nuclear proliferation, world hunger, revolution and intervention, transnational enterprises, competing ideologies of international relations, and global ecology. (Same as POL 3563. Credit cannot be earned for both GLA 3563 and POL 3563.).

GLA 3593. Topics in Latin American Security. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013 or GLA 1013. This seminar examines key questions for regional security in Latin America. Although drawing on scholarly and historical materials, this course focuses essentially on contemporary regional security and includes general topics, such as regional security, peace and war in Latin America, civil-military relations, drug trafficking, and public security. The cases are selected in part to provide geographical balance and contemporary relevance, but also to demonstrate the contrasts between traditional and emerging security questions in the region. (Same as POL 3593. Credit cannot be earned for both GLA 3593 and POL 3593.).

GLA 3633. Political Economy. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: GLA 1013 or POL 1013. The political, legal, and ethical context of modern commercial society is explored through the evolution of conceptions of the economy, the individual, and the state. Topics may include the institutional foundations of market societies, ethical and legal impact of business practices, comparisons of national economic policies, the interaction of modern government and economic activity, and the impact of markets on concepts of public and private life. (Same as POL 3633. Credit cannot be earned for both GLA 3633 and POL 3633.).

GLA 3763. Globalization. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: GLA 1013 or POL 1013. This course examines normative and empirical issues in globalization debates, such as the role of states and nonstate actors, the emergence of global civil society, patterns of international development, the influence of international integration on security, health, violence, and intercultural toleration, and the status of institutions for global justice. (Formerly INS 3763. Same as POL 3763. Credit cannot be earned for more than one of the following: GLA 3763, INS 3763, or POL 3763.).

GLA 3783. Democracy and World Politics. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: GLA 1013 or POL 1013. This course examines theories of democratic transition and focuses on the problematics of democratic change throughout the world. Case studies may include political change after the end of the Cold War in the former Communist states, democratic transitions in Latin America, patterns of change in sub-Saharan Africa, the Middle East, and south Asia. (Same as POL 3783. Credit cannot be earned for both GLA 3783 and POL 3783.) (Formerly titled "Comparative Democratization").

GLA 4013. The Intelligence Community and Global Affairs. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: GLA 1013 or POL 1013. Discusses the historical and political developments of intelligence as a component of defense and security policy, mainly in the post-World War II era. Examines the legal foundations of the American national security and intelligence functions, including discussion of accountability and control measures. Emphasizes the role of intelligence in national security policy-making principally conducted by the Executive and Legislative branches in democratic societies. Discusses the main functions of intelligence. (Same as POL 4013. Credit cannot be earned for both GLA 4013 and POL 4013.) Generally offered: Spring.

GLA 4123. Advanced Techniques in Global Affairs. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: GLA 1013 or POL 1013. Examines various techniques for collecting, analyzing, and communicating information by government and private sector organizations engaged in global analysis. Stresses methodologies for analyzing informational inputs, including strengths and weaknesses of various analytical applications. Studies analytic cultures and pathologies associated with information collection and interpretation, legal and political oversight, accommodation of dissenting views in interpretation and policy debate, and economic, political, and cultural implications of analytical findings. Compares and contrasts analytical methods employed by public and private organizations. May be taught from different perspectives depending upon faculty expertise and interests. (Same as POL 4023. Credit cannot be earned for both GLA 4123 and POL 4023.) Generally offered: Fall.

GLA 4133. Conflict, Law, and Security in Global Affairs. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: GLA 1013 or POL 1013. This course offers students an opportunity to closely examine the causes, dynamics, and dilemmas associated with conflict on the modern global stage. Issues under discussion may include intra- and interstate conflicts; nationalism and conflict; economic, social, and political costs and implications of conflict; national and international approaches to conflict resolution, reconstruction, and development; human rights principles and questions of international law and justice; debates about humanitarian interventions; population displacements; the range of security concerns and responses by government actors and institutions; and the viability of nation states in protecting individuals, groups, and institutions of governance.

GLA 4163. Model UN. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. GLA 3533 is recommended. The course introduces students to the United Nations and the world of Model UN. The class will discuss the organization's history, structure, operations, and role in the international system. Applying this knowledge in educational simulation, the class will engage students in modelling the UN. This will include hosting a Model UN as well as competing nationally as delegates. As such, the class will solidify substantial knowledge on the UN as well as provide logistical project management skills. (Same as POL 4163. Credit cannot be earned for both GLA 4163 and POL 4163.).

GLA 4853. Study Abroad: Global Affairs. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. A lecture course associated with a study abroad program. Involves international travel and field trips. May be repeated for credit when the destination country varies.

GLA 4856. Study Abroad: Global Affairs. (6-0) 6 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. A seminar course associated with a study abroad program exploring global perspectives on politics, geography, and governance. Involves international travel and field trips. May be repeated for credit depending on host country/destination.

GLA 4911. Independent Study. (0-0) 1 Credit Hour.

Prerequisites: GLA 1013 and Independent Study Course Form signed by the instructor, the student’s advisor, the Department Chair, and the Dean of the College of Liberal and Fine Arts. Independent reading, research, discussion, and/or writing under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated for credit, but not more than 6 semester credit hours of independent study, regardless of discipline, will apply to a bachelor’s degree.

GLA 4912. Independent Study. (0-0) 2 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: GLA 1013 and Independent Study Course Form signed by the instructor, the student’s advisor, the Department Chair, and the Dean of the College of Liberal and Fine Arts. Independent reading, research, discussion, and/or writing under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated for credit, but not more than 6 semester credit hours of independent study, regardless of discipline, will apply to a bachelor’s degree.

GLA 4913. Independent Study. (0-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: GLA 1013 and Independent Study Course Form signed by the instructor, the student’s advisor, the Department Chair, and the Dean of the College of Liberal and Fine Arts. Independent reading, research, discussion, and/or writing under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated for credit, but not more than 6 semester credit hours of independent study, regardless of discipline, will apply to a bachelor’s degree.

GLA 4933. Internship in Global Affairs. (0-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: GLA 1013 and consent of the internship coordinator and Department Chair. Supervised experience relevant to global affairs within selected community and national organizations. A maximum of 6 semester credit hours may be earned through the internship.

GLA 4936. Internship in Global Affairs. (0-0) 6 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: GLA 1013 and consent of the internship coordinator and Department Chair. Supervised experience relevant to global affairs within selected community and national organizations. A maximum of 6 semester credit hours may be earned through the internship.

GLA 4953. Special Studies in Global Affairs. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: GLA 1013. An organized course offering the opportunity for specialized study not normally or not often available as part of the regular course offerings. Special Studies may be repeated for credit when topics vary, but not more than 6 semester credit hours, regardless of discipline, will apply to a bachelor’s degree.

GLA 4973. Seminar in Global Affairs. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: GLA 1013 and POL 2703. The opportunity for an intensive study of a selected topic. Primary emphasis on supervised research on various aspects of the topic. May be repeated for credit when topics vary, up to an additional 3 credits. Enrollment limited to juniors and seniors majoring in Global Affairs. Generally offered: Spring.

GLA 4983. Research Practicum. (0-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: GLA 1013 and permission in writing (form available) of the instructor, the student’s advisor, and the Department Chair. The practicum provides students with the opportunity to focus on a specific research issue having practical applications in global affairs. Students participate in hands-on research experience on the issue in a collective research environment. Potential research may be related to the Social Research Lab or Study Abroad programs.

GLA 4993. Honors Thesis. (0-0) 3 Credit Hours.

A minimum grade point average of 3.0 at UTSA, a 3.5 grade point average in the major, and recommendation by a member of the Political Science and Geography faculty. Supervised research and preparation of an honors thesis. May be repeated once with advisor’s approval. Students who are approved will enroll in the appropriate honors thesis courses during their final two semesters at UTSA. To earn honors, the thesis must be passed by an Honors Committee that will be formed with the recommending faculty and another faculty member. Students interested in enrolling should contact the Department Undergraduate Advisor of Record for additional information.

Latin American Studies (LAS) Courses

LAS 2013. Latin American Foundations. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

This course is designed as an introduction to important debates about Latin American history, politics, society and culture. In this course, we will analyze general and specific questions regarding pre-Hispanic cultures, colonial legacies, cultural heritages, political developments and societal challenges facing the region. The structure of this course is primarily chronological but also thematic and inter-disciplinary, involving anthropological, historical, cultural, and political studies about Latin America.

LAS 4933. Internship in Latin American Studies. (0-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Consent of internship coordinator and Department Chair. Supervised experience relevant to Latin American studies within selected community organizations. May be repeated for credit. A maximum of 6 semester credit hours may be earned through the internship.

LAS 4953. Topics in Latin American Studies. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

An organized course offering the opportunity for specialized study not normally or not often available as part of the regular course offerings. May be repeated for credit when topics vary, but not more than 6 semester credit hours, regardless of discipline, will apply to a bachelor’s degree.

Political Science (POL) Courses

POL 1013. Introduction to American Politics. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours. (TCCN = GOVT 2305)

This course provides an introduction to American politics. The course centers on the fundamental role played by the institutions of American government including Congress, the Presidency, Federal Judiciary, and the Bureaucracy in understanding political dynamics in the United States. The course also examines public opinion and participation as inputs to the institutions of American government, and the mediating role of organizations such as interest groups, the news media, and political parties. Considerable time is devoted to thinking about how these components fit together, and how they shape the nature and importance of citizenship and civic engagement. The course also makes connections between politics at the federal level of government and the political institutions and processes of the state of Texas. This course is required to fulfill the Core Curriculum requirement in Government-Political Science. Generally offered: Fall, Spring, Summer.

POL 1133. Texas Politics and Society. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours. (TCCN = GOVT 2306)

This course involves the analysis of Texas government institutions, political behavior, civic engagement and their political and philosophical foundations. Topics may include discussions of the Texas and U.S. Constitutions; the role of state in the federal system; the diverse demographic, economic, and cultural bases of state politics; elections, interest groups, and elites; and legislative, executive, judicial, urban, and county politics. Considerable time is devoted to thinking about how these components fit together, and how they shape the nature and importance of citizenship and civic engagement in Texas. May be applied toward the Core Curriculum requirement in Government-Political Science. Generally offered: Fall, Spring, Summer.

POL 1213. Civil Rights in Texas and America. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours. (TCCN = GOVT 2306)

This course presents the central elements of traditional introductory political science courses on Texas politics using an alternative, contextual method that teaches students to understand broader political and legal subjects through the lens of civil rights issues and struggles. May be applied toward the Core Curriculum requirement in Government-Political Science. (Formerly titled "Studies in Texas and American Politics.").

POL 2503. Introduction to Political Theory. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. An examination of fundamental concepts in political science such as justice, democracy, obligation, freedom, and equality. Generally offered: Fall, Spring.

POL 2513. Politics and the Administrative Process. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. The role of bureaucratic agencies in the formulation and implementation of public policy. Organization theory and administration in the public sector. While the approach of the course is comparative, special emphasis is placed on bureaucracy in the United States. (Formerly titled "Public Administration and Public Policy.").

POL 2533. Introduction to Political Science. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours. (TCCN = GOVT 2304)

Prerequisite: POL 1013. An introduction to the discipline of political science, with particular emphasis devoted to its development from 1880 to the present. Topics may include types of political institutions, uses of political science, participation by political scientists in public affairs or public policy, and career options available to political science majors. Generally offered: Spring.

POL 2603. International Politics. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. The course focuses on the study of political processes and interactions between states and non-state actors in an interconnected world, and discusses basic theoretical frameworks like realist, liberal, constructivist and critical approaches; levels of analysis; international institutions; causes of war and peace; and effects of international trade. Other topics discussed may include transnational terrorism; human rights; humanitarian intervention and peacekeeping operations; development; globalization; multinational corporations; nuclear proliferation; climate change; international monetary and financial regimes; democracy promotion, etc. Generally offered: Fall.

POL 2623. Law and Society. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. An examination of the nature of law, its role in sociopolitical systems, and the institutional components of legal systems. Theories and systems of law examined may include natural, constitutional, common, civil, customary, socialist, and theocratic law. May employ a comparative or historical framework for understanding the variety of institutional arrangements through which systems of law are implemented. (Same as PAL 2623. Credit cannot be earned for both PAL 2623 and POL 2623.) Generally offered: Fall.

POL 2633. Comparative Politics. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. A comparative examination of the diverse forms, goals, styles, and practices of government in democratic and authoritarian states. Several major polities will be studied in detail. (Same as GLA 2633. Credit cannot be earned for both POL 2633 and GLA 2633.).

POL 2693. Designing Research in Political Science. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. A practical introduction to understanding, interpreting, assessing, and developing research designs in Political Science. Students will be introduced to the different elements of research design and inquiry, including the development of research questions, techniques of operationalization and measurement, and methods of analysis. Topics may also include major theoretical approaches and philosophical debates related to social science inquiry to make students aware of the diversity of research approaches that characterizes Political Science in order to utilize and apply this knowledge in their curriculum. Generally offered: Fall, Spring.

POL 2703. Quantitative Methods in Political Science. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. An introduction to fundamental quantitative analysis geared to provide the student knowledge and skills applicable for graduation and beyond. Emphasis will be placed on literacy and basic proficiency in statistical topics and techniques (e.g., classic hypothesis testing, univariate through multivariate analyses); and, data management (e.g., entry and manipulation) and graphical presentation of analysis. Standard statistical software packages will be used. Generally offered: Fall, Spring.

POL 3013. The American Legal Process. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. An introduction to how the United States legal system is organized and functions. A broad overview of the system and its actors is combined with a focus on particular areas of the law such as domestic relations, personal injury liability litigation, criminal procedure, and alternative dispute resolution. (Same as PAL 3013. Credit cannot be earned for both PAL 3013 and POL 3013.) Generally offered: Fall.

POL 3033. International Governance. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. International law, organizations, regimes, hierarchies, and norms such as sovereignty govern the international system. These factors help create a world order that limits armed conflict, regulates the world economy, advances environmental protection, and sets human rights standards. This course explains theories of international governance, and compares these perspectives to the analysis of political scientists on the past record and likely future of world order. (Same as GLA 3033. Credit cannot be earned for both POL 3033 and GLA 3033.) Generally offered: Summer.

POL 3043. International Human Rights. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. This course explores the philosophical and political meaning of fundamental human rights; cases of human rights violations (such as genocide in the Holocaust, Rwanda, Kosovo, and Cambodia; the death penalty; female genital mutilation; violations of workers’ rights; and torture); and the role that states, international organizations and individuals can play in ending human rights abuses. Course readings may include contemporary theories of human rights and case studies on the enforcement of rights around the world. (Same as GLA 3043. Credit cannot be earned for both POL 3043 and GLA 3043.).

POL 3093. Mexican American Politics. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. An opportunity to study Mexican American participation in the electoral process, political and economic institutions, labor organizations, and alternative modes of political action.

POL 3103. Contemporary Theories of Justice. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. An exploration of competing contemporary accounts of the political, economic, and cultural components of a just society. Some of the following theories will be discussed: libertarianism, liberalism, socialism, Marxism, communitarianism, multiculturalism, feminism, critical race perspectives, and environmentalism. (Formerly titled "Political Ideology.").

POL 3113. American Political Thought. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. Consideration of American political thought with an emphasis on primary sources. Readings may include the works of Winthrop, Madison, Hamilton, Jefferson, Tocqueville, Calhoun, Lincoln, Melville, Twain, Douglass, DuBois, Addams, Croly, Wilson, Roosevelt, MLK, Malcolm X, and other diverse works of a political, philosophical, or literary nature. May be organized chronologically or topically. Generally offered: Spring.

POL 3123. Political Psychology. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. Political psychology seeks to explain the behavior of political leaders and mass publics by focusing on the psychological underpinnings of such behavior—their personalities, identities, values, attitudes, and feelings. Attention will be given to the interaction of these factors within different political environments. Topics may include political socialization; personality and political leadership; the psychology of small group decision making; the psychology of mass participation; and affect and cognition in political judgment. Generally offered: Spring.

POL 3133. Political Philosophy: Ancient and Medieval. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. The major works of Western political philosophy from ancient times to the Renaissance. Writers examined may include Plato, Aristotle, Thucydides, Augustine, and Machiavelli.

POL 3143. Political Philosophy: Modern. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. The major works of political philosophy from the Renaissance to the 19th century. Writers examined may include Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Hegel, Marx, and Mill.

POL 3153. Political Philosophy: Contemporary. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. Political thought from the late 19th century to the present. Topics examined may include contemporary Marxism and critical theory, analytic political theory, positivism and social science, phenomenological approaches, existentialism, and contemporary ethics.

POL 3173. Justice and Social Policy. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. This course examines social policies relating to the family, education, health care, old age, poverty, and other issues from a normative or social justice perspective. Questions that this course addresses may include: What role , if any, should the state play in the family? What should be the goals of a just education system? Should the United States support universal health care? What responsibility, if any, does society have toward the poor?.

POL 3183. Women in Politics. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. An examination of the roles and forms of participation of women in contemporary American politics. Topics may include the fight for civil rights and equality; media portrayals of women in politics; women as candidates and as voters; women as elected officials, activists, and political professionals; and women in the military, including theories of gender and war.

POL 3203. African American Political Thought. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. This course examines the political thought of African Americans from the ante-bellum era to the present. May include the works of Frederick Douglass, Booker T. Washington. W.E.B. Dubois, Ida B. Wells, Marcus Garvey, Richard Wright, Ralph Ellison, Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X, Angela Davis, Cornell West, Shelby Steele, Clarence Thomas, Lani Guinier, Eldridge Cleaver, Barack Obama, and others.

POL 3223. Judicial Politics. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. Topics may include political behavior of the major participants in the judicial process; the development of judicial institutions and processes; the political and administrative context of the judicial process; judicial-executive and judicial-legislative relations; and the impact of judicial decisions. (Same as PAL 3223. Credit cannot be earned for both PAL 3223 and POL 3223.) Generally offered: Spring.

POL 3244. Mass Media and Public Opinion. (3-2) 4 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. Explores the acquisition of political attitudes, the role of the mass media in society and politics, and the relationship between political attitudes and values, the mass media, and public policy. (Formerly POL 3243. Credit cannot be earned for both POL 3244 and POL 3243.) Generally offered: Fall.

POL 3253. Participation and American National Elections. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. An introduction to fundamentals of American electoral politics. Topics will include psychological, sociological and economic models of participation, the presidential primary process, the effectiveness of presidential and congressional campaigns on the vote, psychological/sociological and economic models of the presidential and congressional vote, the incumbency advantage in congressional elections, spending in congressional elections, candidate entry, and comparison of House and Senate elections.

POL 3283. The American Presidency. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. The U.S. president’s role in the American political system. Topics may include the constitutional framework and historical development of presidential powers, presidential personality, and legislative, foreign policy, and war-making powers. Generally offered: Spring.

POL 3293. Political Movements. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. This course examines the origins, mobilizing tactics, and goals of political movements. Movements that may be investigated are the movements of labor, students, women, blacks, environmentalists, and others.

POL 3303. Race, Ethnicity and Public Policy. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. The objective of this course is to familiarize students with a range of discourses to understand the complexities of racial and ethnic inequalities in the United States as well as the history and current state of racial and ethnic politics. The course examines the politics and experiences of several groups, such as African Americans, Hispanics, American Indians, and Asian Americans. It also reviews the wide range of public policy issues as they affect, and are affected by, racial and ethnic considerations.

POL 3313. The Supreme Court. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. This course examines the U.S. Supreme Court as a political and legal institution. Topics may include the colonial and English antecedents to the Supreme Court, its constitutional origins in the framing and ratification debates, major episodes in its development from the early republic to the present, its role within the federal judiciary, its impact on party politics and political culture, and its relationship to Congress, the executive branch, and the state courts. (Same as PAL 3313. Credit cannot be earned for both PAL 3313 and POL 3313).

POL 3323. Constitutional Law I. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. An examination of constitutional questions arising from the institutional features of American government, including electoral processes, separation of powers, and federalism. Emphasizes judicial opinions and other primary sources. May be organized chronologically or topically. Generally offered: Fall.

POL 3333. Constitutional Law II. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. An examination of constitutional questions arising from the protection of rights and liberties in the American political system. Topics may include religious liberty, free speech, voting, property rights, due process, equal protection, and rights of the accused. Emphasizes judicial opinions and other primary sources. May be organized chronologically or topically. (Replaces POL 3023 Civil Liberties in American Law and Practice.).

POL 3353. Leadership and Elites. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. An examination of national political executives in parliamentary and presidential democracies and in authoritarian states. Topics examined may include the selection process, decision making, leadership and bureaucracy, executive-legislative relations, and neocorporatism.

POL 3363. Political Parties and Interest Groups. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. An examination of the purpose of political parties in the political process. Interest groups and their roles in government and public policy.

POL 3373. The Legislative Process. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. An examination of the functions, structures, and politics of legislatures and their relationships to their constituencies and other branches of government.

POL 3383. East European Politics. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. This course provides an overview of politics in Eastern Europe broadly understood as the region of East Central and Southeastern Europe, and the post-Soviet space. It traces the evolution of nation building since the interwar period and the system of communist rule, with a focus on key dimensions of the post-communist transformation of the region. Thematic coverage may include constitutions, political culture, party politics, and Euro-Atlantic integration. (Same as GLA 3383. Credit cannot be earned for POL 3383 and GLA 3383.).

POL 3393. Latin American Politics. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. This course examines trends and variations in political development in Latin America during the last century. The main focus is on the interaction between states and citizens, social relations, and economic development. This course examines issues affecting Latin America as a whole, but readings and lectures will also explore individual countries within the region. (Same as GLA 3393. Credit cannot be earned for both POL 3393 and GLA 3393.).

POL 3403. European Governments. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. The interplay of politics with the changing social and economic environment in the advanced industrial societies of Western Europe. Elites, participation, governmental structures, party systems, interest groups, and public policy will be examined in several selected polities and the European Union. (Same as GLA 3403. Credit cannot be earned for both POL 3403 and GLA 3403.).

POL 3413. Urban Development: Politics Planning, and Power. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

The study of urbanization as a general process from multi-disciplinary perspectives - political, economic, geographic, and social. We will analyze urban change dynamics (both growth and stagnation) and study urban regimes with an emphasis on the history and current forms of spatial and social segregation of cities by race, class, ethnicity, culture, and gender. Case studies may be drawn from Texas urban areas, including San Antonio and Austin. (Formerly titled "The Politics of Urban Development.") (Same as GES 3563. Credit cannot earned for both GES 3563 and POL 3413.).

POL 3423. Geopolitics of Russia and Eurasia. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. Multidisciplinary introduction and regional study of the Russian Federation and the Eurasian realm, including the Caucasus, Central Asian nations, Afghanistan, and Mongolia. Both the geography and the politics of this area will be analyzed. Historical and contemporary geopolitical topics include nation-building, regional civilizations, revolution, terrorism, the 19th-century Great Game, the rise of the USSR, and the current transition of the Russian Federation to an uncertain future. (Same as GLA 3423 and GES 3423. Credit cannot be earned for more than one of the following: GLA 3423, GES 3423, GRG 3423, or POL 3423.).

POL 3433. Governments and Politics of Southeast Asia. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. A comparative examination of the political systems of selected Southeast Asian countries and their efforts to deal with political, economic, and social change. Countries studied may include Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, and Vietnam. (Same as GLA 3433. Credit cannot be earned for both POL 3433 and GLA 3433.) Generally offered: Spring.

POL 3443. Governments and Politics of East Asia. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. A comparative examination of the political systems of selected East Asian countries and their efforts to deal with problems of political, economic, and social change. Countries studied may include the People’s Republic of China, the Republic of China, and South Korea. (Same as GLA 3443. Credit cannot be earned for both POL 3443 and GLA 3443.).

POL 3453. Politics of Mexico. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. This course is an introduction to contemporary Mexican politics. It begins with a review of Mexico’s history since independence, and then moves on to study the key challenges in Mexican political development. The course focuses on identifying the key players and institutions involved in Mexican politics, and will evaluate the nature of Mexico’s recent democratic transition/consolidation process. (Same as GLA 3453. Credit cannot be earned for both POL 3453 and GLA 3453).

POL 3463. Politics of the Third World. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. The political system of various Third World nations. An inquiry into the political and economic problems of these countries, such as development, instability, and political change. (Same as GLA 3463. Credit cannot be earned for both POL 3463 and GLA 3463.) Generally offered: Summer.

POL 3473. Latin America in the World. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: POL 1013 and one of the following: POL 3393, POL 3453, HIS 2533; or consent of instructor. Advanced survey of major theories and problems in Latin American political and economic development, theories of dependency, corporatism, bureaucratic authoritarianism, and transitions of democracy. Selected problems such as political stability, land reform, economic integration, multinational corporations, inflation, foreign debt, revolution and reform, and the military in politics. (Same as GLA 3473. Credit cannot be earned for both GLA 3473 and POL 3473. Formerly titled "Theories and Problems in Latin American Politics.").

POL 3483. International Political Economy. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. This course is an introduction to the institutions and policies that govern international economic relations. Students will study the development of the international economic system as well as controversies over money, trade, and governance. (Same as GLA 3483. Credit cannot be earned for both POL 3483 and GLA 3483.).

POL 3493. Politics of the Middle East. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. An examination of the past, present, and future of Middle East politics, with an emphasis on culture, politics, religion, and conflicts in the area; the international relations of Middle Eastern countries as well as superpowers’ involvement. (Same as GLA 3493. Credit cannot be earned for both POL 3493 and GLA 3493.).

POL 3503. American Foreign Policy since World War II. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. Major private interests and public institutions involved in American foreign policy making; public opinion and foreign involvement; specific policies toward international organizations and major world regions. (Same as GLA 3503. Credit cannot be earned for both POL 3503 and GLA 3503.).

POL 3513. International Organizations in World Politics. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: GLA 1013 or POL 1013. This course will examine the role and influence of international organizations in major issue areas such as security, development, human rights, and regionalism. Organizations examined include the United Nations system, regional organizations, alliance systems, and common markets (Same as GLA 3513. Credit cannot be earned for both POL 3513 and GLA 3513.) Generally offered: Fall.

POL 3523. Force in International Politics. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. This course engages with experiences of violence in international relations. It provides an examination of modern research into the use of coercion in international relations with a focus on economic sanctions, war, and terrorism. Special emphasis will be placed on the causes, trends, and consequences of interstate wars. Topics may include armed conflict, trauma and suffering, laws of war, representation of war in media, peace movements, and the technologies of peace making. (Same as GLA 3523. Credit cannot be earned for both POL 3523 and GLA 3523).

POL 3553. The Welfare State in Comparative Perspective. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. History and development of social policies in modern societies. Policy areas covered may include pensions, health care, income maintenance, housing, education, training, and child care. (Formerly titled "Social Policy in Modern Welfare States.") Generally offered: Spring.

POL 3563. Current Issues in World Politics. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. An examination of the issues that divide the people of the world. The structure of contemporary world problems will be studied and possible strategies for the reduction of international conflict will be assessed. Topics may include nuclear proliferation, world hunger, revolution and intervention, transnational enterprises, competing ideologies of international relations, and global ecology. (Same as GLA 3563. Credit cannot be earned for both POL 3563 and GLA 3563.).

POL 3583. Jurisprudence. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. An inquiry into the nature of law and legal obligation with emphasis on relevant works of political philosophy and those of important jurists. Works covered in the course may represent natural law, positivist, realist, theocratic, and critical perspectives on law. (Formerly POL 4153. Same as PAL 3583. Credit cannot be earned for both POL 3583 and POL 4153 or PAL 3583.).

POL 3593. Topics in Latin American Security. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013 or GLA 1013. This seminar examines key questions for regional security in Latin America. Although drawing on scholarly and historical materials, this course focuses essentially on contemporary regional security and includes general topics, such as regional security, peace and war in Latin America, civil-military relations, drug trafficking, and public security. The cases are selected in part to provide geographical balance and contemporary relevance, but also to demonstrate the contrasts between traditional and emerging security questions in the region. (Same as GLA 3593. Credit cannot be earned for both GLA 3593 and POL 3593.).

POL 3633. Political Economy. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. The political, legal, and ethical context of modern commercial society is explored through the evolution of conceptions of the economy, the individual, and the state. Topics may include the institutional foundations of market societies, ethical and legal impact of business practices, comparisons of national economic policies, the interaction of modern government and economic activity, and the impact of markets on concepts of public and private life. (Same as GLA 3633. Credit cannot be earned for both POL 3633 and GLA 3633.) Generally offered: Fall.

POL 3643. Justice among Nations. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. An examination of different theories of justice between states and/or the citizens of different states. Topics may include just war theory; cosmopolitan and anti-cosmopolitan debates; theories of human rights and the challenges to them; multiculturalism; diverse religious or cultural views on justice in world affairs. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

POL 3743. Politics in Film. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. This course examines the role of film in the political process and in the broader political development of the United States and other countries. Students will study how American and international films operate as information, propaganda, and entertainment.

POL 3763. Globalization. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. This course examines normative and empirical issues in globalization debates, such as the role of states and nonstate actors, the emergence of global civil society, patterns of international development, the influence of international integration on security, health, violence, and intercultural toleration, and the status of institutions for global justice. (Same as GLA 3763 and INS 3763. Credit cannot be earned for more than one of the following: POL 3763, GLA 3763, or INS 3763.) Generally offered: Summer.

POL 3773. Experiments in Democratic Renewal. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: POL 1013 and GLA 1013 or POL 2603 or POL 2633. This course examines experiments with popular participation around the world that try new forms of collective action to solve public problems. The setting of these experiments is the double movement of globalization of production and the decentralization of government which have placed a premium on learning processes in contrast to the bureaucratic welfare state and market-based decision-making. The course examines cases in the United States as well as other countries, such as Brazil, Mexico, Canada, India, and others. The course will examine debates about the foundations for as well as the efficacy of new decision-making procedures. Policy cases may include schooling, environmental protection, policing, housing, drug rehabilitation, sweat shop labor, community finance, women’s development, and public budgeting.

POL 3783. Democracy and World Politics. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. This course examines theories of democratic transition and focuses on the problematics of democratic change throughout the world. Case studies may include political change after the end of the Cold War in the former Communist states, democratic transitions in Latin America, patterns of change in sub-Saharan Africa, the Middle East, and south Asia. (Same as GLA 3783. Credit cannot be earned for both POL 3783 and GLA 3783.) (Formerly titled "Comparative Democratization.").

POL 3813. Politics of Federal Justice Policy Making. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. This course examines the intersections of politics and legal institutions of the federal government. Consideration will be given to major historical and political developments mainly associated with policy decisions of the federal executive and the federal judiciary in carrying out constitutional and statutory obligations in civil and criminal enforcement, adjudication, and punishment. Special emphasis will be given to how federal justice policies are formed, implemented, and evaluated by presidents, Congress, and the federal courts in policy areas such as civil rights, privacy and surveillance, interstate and international criminal organizations, investigative practices, prosecutorial effectiveness, and civil and criminal penalties/sanctions. (Same as PAL 3813. Credit cannot be earned for both PAL 3813 and POL 3813.).

POL 3823. Politics of Congressional Elections. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. An introduction to the politics of congressional elections. Topics include determinants of national election outcomes, campaigning for Congress, strategic behavior, primary elections, the incumbency advantage, money in congressional elections, Senate versus House comparisons, and representation.

POL 3843. Campaign and Election Law. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. This course examines the laws that govern elections in the United States. Topics include the constitutional and legal issues arising from campaign finance regulations, political party organization, election administration, and redistricting as well as the constitutional and statutory protection of voting rights. The course may also consider these issues in comparative perspective. (Same as PAL 3843. Credit cannot be earned for both PAL 3843 and POL 3843.).

POL 3853. Immigration Law. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. Examines the legal framework of immigration and citizenship in the United States. Topics include the history and development of immigration and citizenship policy, the constitutional and international law foundations of immigration regulation, the structure and operation of federal institutions that regulate immigration, the role of state and local governments in enforcing immigration policy, and the legal processes that adjudicate immigration cases. (Same as PAL 3853. Credit cannot be earned for both PAL 3853 and POL 3853).

POL 4013. The Intelligence Community and World Affairs. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. Discusses the historical and political developments of intelligence as a component of defense and security policy, mainly in the post-World War II era. Examines the legal foundations of the American national security and intelligence functions, including discussion of accountability and control measures. Emphasizes the role of intelligence in national security policy making, principally conducted by the Executive and Legislative branches in democratic societies. Discusses the main functions of intelligence. (Same as GLA 4013. Credit cannot be earned for both POL 4013 and GLA 4013.) Generally offered: Spring.

POL 4023. Techniques in Global Analysis. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. Examines various techniques for collecting, analyzing, and communicating information by government and private sector organizations engaged in global analysis. Stresses methodologies for analyzing informational inputs, including strengths and weaknesses of various analytical applications. Studies analytic cultures and pathologies associated with information collection and interpretation, legal and political oversight, accommodation of dissenting views in interpretation and policy debate, and economic, political, and cultural implications of analytical findings. Compares and contrasts analytical methods employed by public and private organizations. May be taught from different perspectives depending upon faculty expertise and interests. (Same as GLA 4123. Credit cannot be earned for both POL 4023 and GLA 4123.) Generally offered: Fall.

POL 4123. Legal and Philosophical Reasoning. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. An intensive analysis of selected philosophical texts focusing on law and justice. Students are challenged to develop critical reading and thinking skills by studying the texts of philosophers such as Plato, Aristotle, Dworkin, Hart, and/or others who outline difficult arguments and unfamiliar ideas. Emphasis is placed on drawing reasoned conclusions, advocating positions, and expressing oneself in oral and written forms. (Same as PAL 4123. Formerly LGS 4123. Credit cannot be earned for both POL 4123 and PAL 4123 or LGS 4123.).

POL 4133. Politics, Law, and Literature. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. Examination of fundamental questions of political theory as treated in works of literature. Topics may include authority, law and discretion, the individual and the community, church and state, criminality, and the nature of freedom, especially as these issues emerge in different political orders. Potential works include Greek tragedy and comedy, Dante, Shakespeare, Dostoyevsky, Hawthorne, Melville, Twain, Richard Wright, Ralph Ellison, Flannery O’Connor, Robert Penn Warren, Walker Percy, Saul Bellow, and others. (Same as PAL 4153. Credit cannot be earned for both POL 4133 and PAL 4153).

POL 4163. Model UN. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. The course introduces students to the United Nations and the world of Model UN. The class will discuss the organization's history, structure, operations, and role in the international system. Applying this knowledge in educational simulation, the class will engage students in modelling the UN. This will include hosting a Model UN as well as competing nationally as delegates. As such, the class will solidify substantial knowledge on the UN as well as provide logistical project management skills. Credit in GLA 3533 is not a perquisite but priority will be given to students who have who have taken GLA 3533. (Same as GLA 4163. Credit cannot be earned for both POL 4163 and GLA 4163.).

POL 4323. Administrative Law. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. A survey of those aspects of public law of particular relevance to public administration, analyzing such problem areas as the delegation of authority; formal accountability; open records and confidentiality; and responsiveness to democratic value in decision making. (Same as PAL 4323. Credit cannot be earned for both PAL 4323 and POL 4323.) Generally offered: Spring.

POL 4853. Study Abroad: Political Science. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. A lecture course associated with a study abroad program. Involves international travel and field trips. May be repeated for credit when the destination country varies.

POL 4911. Independent Study. (0-0) 1 Credit Hour.

Prerequisites: Independent Study Course Form signed by the instructor, the student’s advisor, the Department Chair, and the Dean of the College of Liberal and Fine Arts. Independent reading, research, discussion, and/or writing under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated for credit, but not more than 6 semester credit hours of independent study, regardless of discipline, will apply to a bachelor’s degree.

POL 4912. Independent Study. (0-0) 2 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: Independent Study Course Form signed by the instructor, the student’s advisor, the Department Chair, and the Dean of the College of Liberal and Fine Arts. Independent reading, research, discussion, and/or writing under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated for credit, but not more than 6 semester credit hours of independent study, regardless of discipline, will apply to a bachelor’s degree.

POL 4913. Independent Study. (0-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: Independent Study Course Form signed by the instructor, the student’s advisor, the Department Chair, and the Dean of the College of Liberal and Fine Arts. Independent reading, research, discussion, and/or writing under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated for credit, but not more than 6 semester credit hours of independent study, regardless of discipline, will apply to a bachelor’s degree.

POL 4933. Internship in Political Science. (0-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: Consent of internship coordinator and Department Chair. Supervised experience relevant to political science within selected community organizations. A maximum of 6 semester credit hours may be earned through the internship.

POL 4936. Internship in Political Science. (0-0) 6 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: Consent of internship coordinator and Department Chair. Supervised experience relevant to political science within selected community organizations. A maximum of 6 semester credit hours may be earned through the internship.

POL 4953. Special Studies in Political Science. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. An organized course offering the opportunity for specialized study not normally or not often available as part of the regular course offerings. Special Studies may be repeated for credit when topics vary, but not more than 6 semester credit hours, regardless of discipline, will apply to a bachelor’s degree.

POL 4973. Seminar in Political Science. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: POL 1013, POL 2693, POL 2703, and 15 semester credit hours in POL, or consent of instructor. The opportunity for an intensive study of a selected topic. Primary emphasis on supervised research on various aspects of the topic. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Enrollment limited to juniors and seniors majoring in political science. Generally offered: Fall, Spring.

POL 4983. Research Practicum. (0-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: Permission in writing (form available) of the instructor, the student’s advisor, and the Department Chair. The practicum provides students with the opportunity to focus on a specific research issue having practical applications in geography, governance, politics, or policy. Students participate in a hands-on research experience on the issue in a collective research environment.

POL 4993. Honors Thesis. (0-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade point average of 3.0 at UTSA, a 3.5 grade point average in the major, and recommendation by a member of the Political Science and Geography faculty. Supervised research and preparation of an honors thesis. May be repeated once with advisor’s approval. Students who are approved will enroll in the appropriate honors thesis courses during their final two semesters at UTSA. To earn honors, the thesis must be passed by an Honors Committee that will be formed with the recommending faculty and another faculty member. Students interested in enrolling should contact the Department Undergraduate Advisor of Record for additional information.

Politics and Law (PAL) Courses

PAL 2013. Introduction to Legal Studies. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. An introduction to legal studies from an interdisciplinary perspective, exploring historical and contemporary aspects of the content, operations, and effects of law in societies. (Formerly LGS 2013. Credit cannot be earned for both PAL 2013 and LGS 2013.) Generally offered: Fall, Spring.

PAL 2623. Law and Society. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. An examination of the nature of law, its role in sociopolitical systems, and the institutional components of legal systems. Theories and systems of law examined may include natural, constitutional, common, civil, customary, socialist, and theocratic law. May employ a comparative or historical framework for understanding the variety of institutional arrangements through which systems of law are implemented. (Same as POL 2623. Credit cannot be earned for both PAL 2623 and POL 2623.) Generally offered: Fall.

PAL 3013. The American Legal Process. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. An introduction to how the United States legal system is organized and functions. A broad overview of the system and its actors is combined with a focus on particular areas of the law such as domestic relations, personal injury liability litigation, criminal procedure, and alternative dispute resolution. (Same as POL 3013. Credit cannot be earned for PAL 3013 and POL 3013.) Generally offered: Fall.

PAL 3023. Legal Research and Writing. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. Provides students with the opportunity to explore the modes and sources of legal research, both traditional and electronic. (Formerly LGS 3013. Credit cannot be earned for both LGS 3013 and PAL 3023.) Generally offered: Fall, Spring, Summer.

PAL 3113. Minorities and the Law. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. This course examines the litigation, case law, legislation, and legal literature associated with African Americans and Mexican Americans in the United States. (Formerly LGS 3113. Credit cannot be earned for both PAL 3113 and LGS 3113.) Generally offered: Fall.

PAL 3213. Law School Studies. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. Basic introduction to the primary subject areas covered in American law schools. Topics generally include Property, Civil Procedure, Contracts, Torts, Criminal Law, Family Law, Constitutional Law, and Professional Ethics. Topic coverage may extend to corporations, oil and gas, tax, or other more specialized topics. The course will better prepare students for the anticipated coursework and subject matter for the transition to law school. (Formerly LGS 3213. Credit cannot be earned for both PAL 3213 and LGS 3213.) Generally offered: Summer.

PAL 3223. Judicial Politics. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. Topics may include political behavior of the major participants in the judicial process; the development of judicial institutions and processes; the political and administrative context of the judicial process; judicial-executive and judicial-legislative relations; and the impact of judicial decisions. (Same as POL 3223. Credit cannot be earned for both PAL 3223 and POL 3223.) Generally offered: Spring.

PAL 3313. The Supreme Court. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. This course examines the U.S. Supreme Court as a political and legal institution. Topics may include the colonial and English antecedents to the Supreme Court, its constitutional origins in the framing and ratification debates, major episodes in its development from the early republic to the present, its role within the federal judiciary, its impact on party politics and political culture, and its relationship to Congress, the executive branch, and the state courts. (Same as POL 3313. Credit cannot be earned for both PAL 3313 and POL 3313).

PAL 3323. Constitutional Analysis l. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. An analysis of constitutional cases, issues, and modes of interpretation focusing on governmental powers. Provides students the opportunity to hone analytical, critical reading, and writing skills and to increase substantive knowledge of constitutional law. (Formerly LGS 3323. Credit cannot be earned for both PAL 3323 and LGS 3323.) Generally offered: Summer.

PAL 3333. Constitutional Analysis ll. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. An analysis of constitutional cases, issues, and modes of interpretation focusing on the Bill of Rights, individual freedoms, and equal protection. Provides students the opportunity to enhance analytical, critical-reading, and writing skills and to increase substantive knowledge of constitutional law. (Formerly LGS 3333. Credit cannot be earned for both PAL 3333 and LGS 3333.) Generally offered: Summer.

PAL 3413. Regulatory Law and Enterprise. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. This course examines federal, state, and local administrative and regulatory engagement with Texan, American, and international enterprise. Students have the opportunity to explore law and policies affecting economic development, property, oil and gas, international trade, the Internet, and the environment. (Formerly LGS 3413. Credit cannot be earned for both PAL 3413 and LGS 3413).

PAL 3513. Trial and Appellate Advocacy. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. Cultivates the practice of deliberative rhetoric with particular emphasis on its use in legal argumentation. Primary activity will be preparation for and participation in moot court, a simulation that involves arguing constitutional cases before the Supreme Court. Entails intensive study of case law. Course may be repeated for credit when the topic varies.

PAL 3533. State Courts: Judicial Decision-Making Practice and Procedure. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. This course will examine American trial courts and specifically the role of the Judge in dispensing and insuring justice in both civil and criminal matters. A constitutional analysis of judicial authority will be studied, including the court’s powers and limitations. A review of the role of the various instrumental components in the administration of justice will be studied from legal counsel, prosecutors, and probation officers and the impact each has in the outcome of cases before the court. Additionally, constitutional protections will be surveyed to provide an in-depth understanding of due process and equal protection under the law and the procedure of litigants and defendants during the trial process.

PAL 3583. Jurisprudence. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. An inquiry into the nature of law and legal obligation with emphasis on relevant works of political philosophy and those of important jurists. Works covered in the course may represent natural law, positivist, realist, theocratic, and critical perspectives on law. (Same as POL 3583. Credit cannot be earned for both PAL 3583 and POL 3583.).

PAL 3813. Politics of Federal Justice Policy. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. This course examines the intersections of politics and legal institutions of the federal government. Consideration will be given to major historical and political developments mainly associated with policy decisions of the federal executive and the federal judiciary in carrying out constitutional and statutory obligations in civil and criminal enforcement, adjudication, and punishment. Special emphasis will be given to how federal justice policies are formed, implemented, and evaluated by presidents, Congress, and the federal courts in policy areas such as civil rights, privacy and surveillance, interstate and international criminal organizations, investigative practices, prosecutorial effectiveness, and civil and criminal penalties/sanctions. (Same as POL 3813. Credit cannot be earned for both PAL 3813 and POL 3813.).

PAL 3843. Campaign and Election Law.. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. This course examines the laws that govern elections in the United States. Topics include the constitutional and legal issues arising from campaign finance regulations, political party organization, election administration, and redistricting as well as the constitutional and statutory protection of voting rights. The course may also consider these issues in comparative perspective. (Same as POL 3843. Credit cannot be earned for both PAL 3843 and POL 3843.).

PAL 3853. Immigration Law. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. Examines the legal framework of immigration and citizenship in the United States. Topics include the history and development of immigration and citizenship policy, the constitutional and international law foundations of immigration regulation, the structure and operation of federal institutions that regulate immigration, the role of state and local governments in enforcing immigration policy, and the legal processes that adjudicate immigration cases. (Same as POL 3853. Credit cannot be earned for both PAL 3853 and POL 3853).

PAL 3863. Contracts. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. An introduction to contract law, including topics such as offer and acceptance, consideration, contracts enforceable without consideration, defenses to enforcement of contracts, terms of contracts and their interpretation, performance and breach of contracts, remedies for breach, third-party beneficiaries, and assignments. (Formerly LGS 3868. Credit cannot be earned for both LGS 3863 and PAL 3863).

PAL 4013. Issues in Law and Society. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: PAL 2013 or POL 1013. Provides students with the opportunity to conduct research on selected issues associated with the law and society. May be repeated for credit when topics vary, with permission of the Director of the Institute for Law and Public Affairs. (Formerly LGS 4013. Credit cannot be earned for both PAL 4013 and LGS 4013.) Generally offered: Spring.

PAL 4123. Legal and Philosophical Reasoning. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. An intensive analysis of selected philosophical texts focusing on law and justice. Students are challenged to develop critical reading and thinking skills by studying the texts of philosophers such as Plato, Aristotle, Dworkin, Hart, and/or others who outline difficult arguments and unfamiliar ideas. Emphasis is placed on drawing reasoned conclusions, advocating positions, and expressing oneself in oral and written forms. (Formerly LGS 4123. Same as POL 4123. Credit cannot be earned for both PAL 4123 and POL 4123 or LGS 4123.).

PAL 4133. Legal Analysis and Argumentation. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. This course provides students with the opportunity to develop and master techniques of focused reading, analytical reasoning, logic, argumentation, and the drawing of reasoned conclusions, placed in the context and modes of questioning appropriate to law school admission and education. Skills learned are relevant not only to law school, but also to developing and accessing arguments throughout college, career, and life. (Formerly LGS 4133. Credit cannot be earned for both PAL 4133 and LGS 4133).

PAL 4153. Law and Literature. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. Examination of fundamental questions of political theory as treated in works of literature. Topics may include authority, law and discretion, the individual and the community, church and state, criminality, and the nature of freedom, especially as these issues emerge in different political orders. Potential works include Greek tragedy and comedy. Dante, Shakespeare, Dostoyevsky, Hawthorne, Melville, Twain, Richard Wright, Ralph Ellison, Flannery O’Connor, Robert Penn Warren, Walker Percy, Saul Bellow, and others. (Same as POL 4133. Credit cannot be earned for both PAL 4153 and POL 4133.).

PAL 4213. Great Controversies in Politics and Law. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: POL 1013 and PAL 2623. This course will examine a legal and political controversy of great importance, either current or historical. Topics vary and are chosen by the instructor. Examples may include Slavery, Abolition, and Reconstruction; Framing and Ratification of the Constitution; Religious Free Exercise; Civil Rights and Civil Disobedience; Presidential War Powers and Congress.

PAL 4223. Torts. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. This course provides students with the opportunity to analyze American tort law. Topics may include negligence, intentional torts, affirmative defenses, and legal damages, as well as vicarious products and strict liability. Students should be prepared to read, brief, and discuss case law. (Formerly LGS 4223. Credit cannot be earned for both PAL 4223 and LGS 4223.) Generally offered: Spring, Summer.

PAL 4233. Federal Courts. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. Designed to provide students with a sophisticated understanding of the role of the federal judiciary in the American constitutional system. Topics may include the constitutional framework and institutional development of the federal courts; their interaction with administrative agencies and state courts; and questions arising from the power of judicial review. (Formerly LGS 4233. Credit cannot be earned for both PAL 4233 and LGS 4233.).

PAL 4323. Administrative Law. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. A survey of those aspects of public law of particular relevance to public administration, analyzing such problem areas as the delegation of authority; formal accountability; open records and confidentiality; and responsiveness to democratic value in decision making. (Same as POL 4323. Credit cannot be earned for both PAL 4323 and POL 4323.) Generally offered: Spring.

PAL 4911. Independent Study. (0-0) 1 Credit Hour.

Prerequisites: Permission in writing (form available) of the instructor, the student’s advisor, the Department Chair, and the Dean of the College in which the course is offered. Independent reading, research, discussion, and/or writing under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated for credit, but not more than 6 semester credit hours of independent study, regardless of discipline, will apply to a bachelor’s degree.

PAL 4912. Independent Study. (0-0) 2 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: Permission in writing (form available) of the instructor, the student’s advisor, the Department Chair, and the Dean of the College in which the course is offered. Independent reading, research, discussion, and/or writing under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated for credit, but not more than 6 semester credit hours of independent study, regardless of discipline, will apply to a bachelor’s degree.

PAL 4913. Independent Study. (0-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: Permission in writing (form available) of the instructor, the student’s advisor, the Department Chair, and the Dean of the College in which the course is offered. Independent reading, research, discussion, and/or writing under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated for credit, but not more than 6 semester credit hours of independent study, regardless of discipline, will apply to a bachelor’s degree. (Formerly LGS 4913).

PAL 4933. Internship in Politics and Law. (0-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: POL 1013 and consent of internship coordinator. Supervised experience relevant to legal studies within selected community organizations. A maximum of 6 semester credit hours may be earned through the internship. A maximum of 3 semester credit hours may be applied to the minor. (Formerly LGS 4933).

PAL 4953. Special Studies in Politics and Law. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: POL 1013. An organized course offering the opportunity for specialized study not normally or not often available as part of the regular course offerings. Special Studies may be repeated for credit when topics vary, but not more than 6 semester credit hours, regardless of discipline, will apply to a bachelor’s degree.

PAL 4973. Senior Seminar in Politics and Law. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: POL 1013, POL 2703, and 15 semester credit hours in PAL or POL coursework, or consent of instructor. Course involves guided, intensive study of a selected topic. Primary emphasis is on supervised research on various aspects of the topic. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Enrollment is limited to juniors and seniors majoring in Politics and Law or Political Science.

PAL 4993. Honors Thesis. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: A minimum grade point average of 3.0 at UTSA, a 3.5 grade point average in the major, and recommendation by a member of the Political Science and Geography faculty. Supervised research and preparation of an honors thesis. Enrollment limited to candidates during the last two semesters. To enroll, contact the Department Undergraduate Advisor of Record for additional information. May be repeated once with advisor’s approval.