History (HIS)

History (HIS) Courses

HIS 1043. United States History: Pre-Columbus to Civil War Era. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours. (TCCN = HIST 1301)

From a variety of perspectives, this course will analyze topics covering the geography of North America; pre-Columbian societies; European colonial societies and their transition into the national period; the development of modern economic structures and political traditions; westward expansion; class, race, ethnicity, and gender; cultural diversity and national unity; the relations of the United States to other nations and cultures; and the impact of these trends and issues on the development of the nation. May be applied toward the Core Curriculum requirement in American History. Generally offered: Fall, Spring, Summer.

HIS 1053. United States History: Civil War Era to Present. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours. (TCCN = HIST 1302)

From a variety of perspectives, this course will analyze topics covering the development of the United States as an urban industrial nation; the rising importance of the business cycle, corporations, and immigration; political traditions; class, race, ethnicity, and gender; cultural diversity and national unity; the relationship between the United States and other nations and cultures; and the impact of these trends on the development of the nation. May be applied toward the Core Curriculum requirement in American History. Generally offered: Fall, Spring, Summer.

HIS 2003. Historical Methods. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: WRC 1013. An introduction to the study of history in which students will consider examples and approaches to the problems of research and writing in the field. This course is designed for students completing requirements for a major or minor in history. A minimum grade of "C-" is needed in HIS 2003 to enroll in HIS 4973. Generally offered: Fall, Spring.

HIS 2053. Texas History. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours. (TCCN = HIST 2301)

An overview of the development of Texas from the era of Spanish exploration and colonization to the modern period, with emphasis on major events in the 19th and 20th centuries. Topics may vary, but generally will include cultural geography, contributions of ethnic minorities and women, the Republic of Texas, statehood, secession, Reconstruction, conservatism, reform, oil exploration, urbanization, and political, economic, and social change in the post-World War II era. May be applied toward the Core Curriculum requirement in American History. Generally offered: Fall, Spring.

HIS 2123. Introduction to World Civilization to the Fifteenth Century. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours. (TCCN = HIST 2321)

A general introduction to World History from the Late Neolithic to the Columbian Encounter in the late 15th century CE. Broad overview of the pattern of development of major civilizations and their interactions with closer attention given to those events, institutions, beliefs, and practices that involved and affected large numbers of people and had lasting significance for later generations. This course is always offered as a Q-course. May be applied toward the Core Curriculum requirement in Language, Philosophy and Culture. (Credit cannot be earned for both HIS 2123 and IDS 2203.) Generally offered: Fall, Spring, Summer.

HIS 2133. Introduction to World Civilization since the Fifteenth Century. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours. (TCCN = HIST 2322)

A general introduction to World History since the late 15th century CE. Broad overview of the pattern of development of major civilizations and their interactions with closer attention to those events, institutions, beliefs, and practices that involved and affected large numbers of people and laid foundations of the modern world. May be applied toward the Core Curriculum requirement in Language, Philosophy and Culture. (Credit cannot be earned for both HIS 2133 and IDS 2213.) Generally offered: Fall, Spring, Summer.

HIS 2533. Introduction to Latin American Civilization. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

An introduction to Latin America examining the broader topics that shaped its history. These topics may include Native American societies; the encounter between Native Americans, Europeans, and Africans; the post-Independence era; the different paths toward nation-building; the nature of authoritarian regimes; the impact of revolutions; and the cultural development of Latin America and its historiography. May be applied toward the Core Curriculum requirement in Language, Philosophy and Culture. Generally offered: Fall, Spring.

HIS 2543. Introduction to Islamic Civilization. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

An introduction to the role of Islam in world history from the Prophet and the founding of the Umayyad Caliphate to the breakup of the Ottoman Empire. Primary focus will be on the Ottoman Empire, its institutions and culture, and its interaction with Western civilization. May be applied toward the Core Curriculum requirement in Language, Philosophy and Culture. Generally offered: Fall.

HIS 2553. Introduction to East Asian Civilization. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

An introduction to East Asian history and culture from antiquity to the beginning of the modern period during the 17th and 18th centuries. The course will cover China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam, with particular attention to the development of culture, society, and the state in the traditional era prior to the arrival of the West in East Asia. May be applied toward the Core Curriculum requirement in Language, Philosophy and Culture.

HIS 2563. Introduction to European Civilization. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

An introduction to the major historical and historiographical problems in the experience of Europe from the earliest times to the present. The course will expose students to a variety of intellectual approaches and to the diversity of European history.

HIS 2573. Introduction to African Civilization. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

An introduction to the major historical and historiographical problems in the experience of Africa from the earliest times to the present. The course will expose students to a variety of intellectual approaches and to the diversity of African history. May be applied toward the Core Curriculum requirement in Language, Philosophy and Culture.

HIS 2583. Introduction to South Asian Civilization. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

This course explores the history, cultures, religions, and civilization of the Indian subcontinent from earliest times to the present. It begins with prehistory and the Indus civilization, the migration and settlement of the Aryans, the ancient empires of the Maurya and Gupta, and the Islamic conquest. The rise and fall of various Muslim kingdoms of the Mughal Empire, British colonial rule, the nationalist movements and independence of India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh are also discussed. May be applied toward the Core Curriculum requirement in Language, Philosophy and Culture.

HIS 3003. Colonial America and the Formation of American Society. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

An examination of the development and transformation of colonial societies in the 17th and 18th centuries, with special emphasis on family and community studies as measures of social change. Generally offered: Fall.

HIS 3023. American Independence and National Unity, 1760–1820. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Topics may include origins of the American Revolution, the Revolutionary War, the struggle for unity, and the early years of nationhood.

HIS 3033. The Spanish and Mexican Borderlands. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

This course will provide students an opportunity to study Spanish exploration, the colonization of New Spain’s northern frontier, and the shift from Spanish to Mexican sovereignty. Topics that may be discussed include Hispanic institutions; customs and traditions; the development of a frontier society; inter-cultural exchanges, conflicts, and negotiations between native societies, Spanish-Mexican settlers, and non-Hispanic European Americans and immigrants; Mexico’s struggle for independence; social, cultural, economic, and political trends within the Mexican republic; the westward migration of people from the United States into Mexico’s northern frontier; the Texas revolt, and the U.S.-Mexico War.

HIS 3043. History of Women in the United States: Pre-Columbus to 1890. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

An examination of how women have been affected by economic, social, cultural, and political structures, with emphasis on the role of class, race, ethnicity, region, and age. Topics may include Native American societies, colonial life, the impact of the American Revolution, the early national period, slavery, the Civil War, westward expansion, and the "cult of domesticity." (Formerly HIS 3473. Credit cannot be earned for both HIS 3043 and HIS 3473).

HIS 3053. History of Women in the United States: Since 1890. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

This course will offer an analysis of women’s lives in U.S. history since 1890 and may examine women’s role in the Progressive Era, World Wars, the Civil Rights Movement, and the Feminist Movement. It will consider the effects of economic, social, cultural, and political structures on women since 1890, with particular attention to the role of class, race, ethnicity, region, and age. (Formerly HIS 3473. Credit cannot be earned for both HIS 3053 and HIS 3473.) Generally offered: Spring.

HIS 3083. History of the American West. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

An examination of the American westward movement in the 19th and 20th centuries. Topics may include the conquest and settlement of the territory, the relationship of the new territory to the nation, patterns of economic development, community building, population diversity, and the symbolism of the frontier.

HIS 3093. United States Constitutional History. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Constitutional developments from the formation of the state and federal constitutions to Watergate. Particular attention is paid to the context of judicial decision-making at the Supreme Court level and the impact of those decisions on American life. Complements POL 3323 Constitutional Law I.

HIS 3113. North American Indian Histories. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

A history of the American Indian from European contact to the present. Attention is given to the internal cultural, economic, and political developments of the different Indian groups as well as to the European and American developments and policies affecting the Indian. (Formerly titled "The American Indian").

HIS 3123. Colonial Texas under Spanish and Mexican Rule to 1836. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

An overview of Texas history beginning with 16th-century and 17th-century Spanish exploration, with emphasis on 18th-century colonization, and culminating in 19th-century Anglo-American immigration and the sociopolitical changes that resulted in Texas independence.

HIS 3133. Themes in the Social History of the United States. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

A survey of social history focusing on the American experience. The course explores changes in the family, work, gender roles, mobility, migration, urbanization, and industrialization, with special attention to class, race, ethnicity, and gender.

HIS 3173. Modern America, 1914–1945. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

An examination of the many developments which fundamentally transformed American society between 1914 and 1945. The course examines how these developments reverberated throughout society, affecting all aspects of American life from habits of leisure to patterns of race relations, from the role of women to the style of presidential leadership.

HIS 3183. Law and American Development. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

The impact of law from colonial times to the present. Particular attention will be paid to the impact of law on social change, economic growth, and political development.

HIS 3193. The South in American History. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Topics may include development of southern identity, slavery, Civil War and Reconstruction, Jim Crowism, the black experience, and the civil rights movement, with emphasis on the period since 1815.

HIS 3223. The Civil War in the Age of Nationalism. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

The U.S. Civil War occurred during an age of violent political upheaval in Europe and the Americas. Grounding the significance of the causes of the Civil War in a transnational context, this course will examine how questions of national self-determination, race, and class the world over influenced the growing differences between the American North and South, as well as the war itself. Setting the Civil War in an international context, this course will enlarge the understanding of the global rise of nationalism in the nineteenth century.

HIS 3243. Europe in the Nineteenth Century. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

The course offers a survey of European history from the Congress of Vienna until World War I. Topics may include an examination of the changing scope of international relations, industrial growth and acceleration, the conditions among social groups, and various social and political initiatives among European nations.

HIS 3253. The United States since 1945. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

An examination of the social, political, economic, and cultural developments which have shaped life in the United States since World War II. Students will explore the causes and consequences of the country’s evolution into a pluralistic, suburban, postindustrial superpower during the last half of the 20th century.

HIS 3263. Seventeenth- and Eighteenth-Century Europe. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

A survey of European history under the Ancient Regime to 1789. Examination of the development of and the limits to absolutism, the "crisis" of the 17th century and the Baroque, the rise of science, and the culture of the Enlightenment.

HIS 3273. The Early Middle Ages. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

This course will examine culture and society in the West (in what was to be Europe) from Late Antiquity to about A.D. 1000. It will focus on the transformation and survival of old social, political, and cultural forms at the end of the Roman Empire and the emergence of new ones in the successor states of Italy, Gaul, Germany, and Britain.

HIS 3283. Twentieth-Century Europe. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Economic, social, political, and cultural change in Europe since World War I. Topics may include the formation of new political movements (such as social democracy, communism, fascism) between the wars, World War II and its effects, the postwar transformation of Europe, and the Cold War in Europe.

HIS 3293. Imperial Spain. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

The history of Spain and its empire from the fifteenth to the early nineteenth century. Topics may include the union of Castile and Aragon, Hapsburg imperialism, the conquest of the Americas, transatlantic and transpacific exchange, the Bourbon reforms, and the Spanish American wars for independence.

HIS 3303. History of Mexico. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

An overview of Mexican history from the pre-Columbian indigenous civilizations to the present. The course will cover the peopling of Mexico, the conquest, the formation of colonial society, independence, the Mexican American War, the liberal reforms, the Porfiriato, and the Mexican Revolution. Generally offered: Spring.

HIS 3313. History of U.S. Relations with Latin America. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

A survey of U.S. relations with Latin America from the Monroe Doctrine to the present. General topics may include the Monroe Doctrine, Manifest Destiny, gunboat diplomacy, the Good Neighbor Policy, the Cold War, and the Alliance for Progress. Specific themes include U.S. reactions to revolutions, authoritarian regimes, and reformist governments.

HIS 3323. Mexican American History to 1900. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

This course surveys the origins of Mexican Americans in the United States from the point of contact between indigenous people and Spanish colonizers to 1900. Thematic topics may include conquest, Spanish colonization, the development of borderlands cultures, migratory and settlement patterns, gendered borderlands, and labor. While the course will end at a time when the U.S. is emerging as a global industrialized nation, much of it covers a time period prior to the foundation of the U.S. as a nation state, thus demonstrating the deep histories of Mexican Americans tied to this land.

HIS 3333. Mexican American History since 1900. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

This course surveys the history of Mexican Americans in the modern United States from 1900 to the present. Covering the period of the greatest migratory flows into the United States from Mexico, this course will address the development of transnational communities and regional identities within the U.S. Emphasis will be placed on such topics as the dialectic between immigration and historically rooted communities, the formation of varied racial and class based identities, civil rights, labor, changing gender roles, and the dynamic geographies of North America.

HIS 3353. Latin America since Independence. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

The course will emphasize the 19th and 20th centuries and may include the following topics: the breakdown of colonialism; the problems of independence; neocolonial development; the impact of the Depression; industrialization and urbanization; and the importance of nationalism, socialism, fascism, communism, and revolution in the contemporary era.

HIS 3373. Revolution in Latin America. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

An analysis of the role colonial legacies played in 19th- and 20th-century social and political violence. Case studies may include Mexico, Bolivia, Cuba, Chile, and Nicaragua.

HIS 3403. Pre-Hispanic and Colonial Latin America. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

An analysis of the pre-Columbian Indian civilizations, the Spanish conquest, and the Spanish and Portuguese colonial societies of the New World.

HIS 3423. United States-Mexico Border. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

This course will examine social, economic, and political conditions shaping the character of the United States-Mexico borderlands. Using a transnational approach, students will have an opportunity to explore the history of the border as a multi-cultural region, and to examine issues relevant to the development of the border area. Topics of interest may include urbanization; industrialization; constructions of race, ethnicity, class, gender, and nationality; trade; migration; security; and ecological problems.

HIS 3433. The Emergence of Modern America, 1877–1914. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

An examination of social and political responses to the industrial revolution in the United States.

HIS 3453. History of Medicine in America. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

The course examines the social and cultural history of health and healing in the United States. By contextualizing the history of health, healthcare, patient stories, disease, and professional development, it provides analytical skills necessary to better evaluate the place of medicine in modern American culture. The particular focus of the course may vary by semester to more closely examine such historical topics as: women and health; rise of the medical profession; technology and medicine; popular culture and health history; and medicine and film.

HIS 3463. History of Religion in the United States. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines Puritanism, disestablishment, the First and Second Great Awakenings, religion and the Civil War, the Social Gospel, urban revivalism and religion, the growth of evangelical Protestantism, and religion in modern America. Special thematic concentrations may include church-state relations, the role of race and ethnicity in American religion, Catholicism and African American religions.

HIS 3493. History of San Antonio. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Topics may include the cultural origins of colonial San Antonio; political, economic, and social development; and the effects of urbanization on local ethnic communities.

HIS 3513. Warfare in the Premodern World. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

A comparative study of military change in the ancient, medieval, and early modern world (to 1815 and the end of the Napoleonic Wars). The course examines such controversies as the Military Revolution and the Fiscal-Military State and describes how societies in Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas organized, trained, and provisioned military forces, developed tactics and strategies of war, and how their military organization impacted state-society relations and their struggles for survival or imperial expansion.

HIS 3523. European Cultural History. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Introduction to various aspects of the European cultural heritage focusing on the interaction between society and culture. Topics may include popular culture, the arts, philosophy, science, social theory, ideology, and mass media. Course content may include discussions of sexuality and graphic visual materials suitable for an adult audience.

HIS 3543. History of Modern Warfare. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Survey of the major developments in the history of war since the Napoleonic era. Analyses of the social, economic, and political context in which wars have occurred. Topics may include emergence of new forms of weaponry, strategy, logistics, and tactics.

HIS 3553. Civil War America. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

This course explores the Civil War era in American history, beginning by tracing the causes of the Civil War, including the role that the economics of slavery played in the conflict. It studies the war itself, examining the social, cultural, and military aspects of the war. The course concludes with an examination of the attempts to reconstruct the Union in the years after the Confederate surrender. Generally offered: Spring.

HIS 3563. African American History to the Civil War. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

A survey of the social, economic, political, and cultural history of African Americans from the time of contact with European slave traders until the Civil War. The course will examine the process by which millions of Africans were taken from their homelands, enslaved, and transported to America, where they were gradually, and often violently, transformed into Americans. While the course will focus on the United States, it will also consider how the experiences of Blacks in America relate to the history of the peoples of the African diaspora.

HIS 3573. African American History since the Civil War. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

This course surveys the African American experience from emancipation to the present, focusing on political, economic, cultural, and social developments. The course will utilize both traditional historical methodology, with its emphasis on chronology and the examination of documents and alternative interdisciplinary methodologies, which analyze nontraditional sources such as film, music, and oral interviews.

HIS 3603. Occupation, Revolution and Nation in Africa. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

This course focuses on political and social change in Africa after 1800, a particularly tumultuous and often violent period in African history. Working from an African perspective, students will explore events and historical processes that were often triggered by external forces. The course examines the ways in which historical themes—conquest, resistance, revolution, nationalism, identity politics—play out in an African context. (Formerly titled "Africa in Colonial and Post-Colonial Contexts").

HIS 3613. Migration, Society and Culture in Africa. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Examination of political and social organization in African societies. The emphasis is on Africa prior to colonization. Topics will include regional trading networks, slavery, the range of political/governmental structures, cultural variation (including categories of gender and generation), and African relations with other parts of the world. (Formerly titled "African Politics, States, and Empires").

HIS 3623. History of the Civil Rights Movement. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

An examination of the struggle for civil rights in the United States from the conclusion of the Civil War to the present. While particular attention will be paid to the movement by Black southerners for equal rights, the course will also consider the struggle for civil rights conducted by other racial minorities in the United States.

HIS 3633. Early Modern England, 1485–1760. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

English history in the Tudor, Stuart, and early Hanoverian eras emphasizing the growth of the national state, the overseas expansion of England, and preindustrial social and economic change.

HIS 3673. Introduction to Latina/o History. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

This course will compare the immigration experiences of people arriving in the United States from different parts of Latin America and the Caribbean. The focus will be on immigrants from other regions of the Americas (e.g., Mexico, Central America, Puerto Rico, Cuba, and the Dominican Republic). Students will have the opportunity to explore the factors that fueled immigration by examining social, political, and economic developments in the sending nations and in the United States. Topics may include territorial conquest, colonialism, real and imagined borders, chain migration, formation of immigrant communities, acculturation, circular migration, gender relations, and social networks.

HIS 3723. The High Middle Ages and the Early Renaissance. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

This course will examine the cultural, political, and social achievements of High Medieval Europe, with particular reference to France, Germany, and Italy. It will then focus on the great crisis of the 14th century and the emergence of a new, antimedieval culture in Early Renaissance Italy to about 1450.

HIS 3733. Europe in the High Renaissance and Reformation. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

This course will study the cultural, social, and political developments of Italy and Northern Europe in the time of the High Renaissance and the Reformation (ca. 1450–1550).

HIS 3743. Imperial Russia. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

The development of Russia from the accession of Peter the Great to the outbreak of the Russian Revolution.

HIS 3753. The Soviet Union and After. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

The evolution of Russia from the revolution of 1917 to the present. A critical analysis of the construction and decline of a socialist society in the Soviet Union and the relationship of 20th-century Russia to the outside world.

HIS 3763. Russia before Peter the Great. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

An examination of the Russian state-building process in the period from the Mongol Yoke to the formation of the Russian Empire, focusing on the development of autocracy, serfdom, and the state service system and examining Russia’s relations with Europe and Asia.

HIS 3773. The Age of the Baroque. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

This course will examine the formation of a Post-Renaissance culture in Europe, with the emergence of Mannerism and the Baroque, and the rise of science. It will also study the struggles for religious and political mastery on the continent from roughly the Peace of Augsburg (1555) to the end of the Thirty Years’ War (1648), in the context of economic, social, and political change.

HIS 3803. World History in the Cinema. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

An analysis of several classic films to introduce for closer critical study important events and issues in world history which have intrigued film makers and their audiences as well as historians. Exploration of the similarities and differences between artistic and historical imagination. (Formerly HIS 2073. Credit cannot be earned for both HIS 3803 and HIS 2073).

HIS 3813. American Political History. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

A study of American political history from the 18th century to the present. Deals with presidents and major national developments and may consider such topics as federalism, state politics, voting behavior, party systems, and political realignment.

HIS 3823. History of American Foreign Relations. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the emergence of the United States as a world power and its subsequent activities in world affairs. The course places particular emphasis on the domestic roots of U.S. activity, the factors shaping perceptions of international affairs, and the causes and consequences of international conflicts involving the United States.

HIS 3833. American Icons. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Examines major events within the past one hundred years that have shaped the "the American Century." Students will have the opportunity to explore the way in which images, institutions, symbols, and persons have become icons, representing American values and ideas, at home and abroad.

HIS 3843. Migration and History. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

What has caused people to migrate as individuals and as groups? To what extent has geographical mobility been a function of economic mobilization, political transformation, social upheaval, and/or technological revolution? How has the migratory process, in turn, affected the migrants themselves, both in their place of origin, and in the host society? Specific theme, regional focus, and time period may vary according to the instructor’s choice of examples drawn from a variety of historical situations.

HIS 3863. Global History of World War I. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the First World War in Europe and beyond. Topics may include the war’s origins, the competing strategic interests of the Great Powers, the impact of the war on Russia, Africa, and the Middle East, the experience of soldiers at the front and civilians at home, and the cultural consequences of war.

HIS 3873. History of World War II in Europe. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the origins and impact of World War II in Europe. While multiple theatres of war are considered, this is not a military history course. Instead, the focus is primarily on the war’s impact on civilian populations and the manner in which the conflict transformed the economic, social, and political realities of domestic life for the major combatants.

HIS 3903. Modern Japan. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

An overview of Japanese history since the end of the 16th century. Topics may include the Tokugawa period of early modern history, the Meiji transformation of state and society, the rise of Japanese militarism leading up to the Pacific War, the American occupation, and the subsequent rebirth of Japan into a global economic giant.

HIS 3913. Late Imperial China. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Chinese history from the late Ming (ca. 1550) to the end of the Qing dynasty in the 1911 Revolution. The course will address the nature of imperial institutions, state-society interaction, economic developments, social and cultural changes, and China’s relationship with the outside world.

HIS 3923. China in Revolution. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

A study of 20th-century China. The course will analyze and characterize the different phases of revolutionary changes in China and examine the sources of its revolutionary impulse. Generally offered: Spring.

HIS 3943. History of India. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

This course questions the extent to which South Asia is an outcome of its traditional structure (religion, caste hierarchy, joint families, village communities), and how much it is a product of global historical forces including colonialism, capitalism, feminism, and globalization. It examines politics and cultures of South Asia, with emphasis on the freedom struggle, the rise of the Congress and the Muslim League, the two-nation theory, partition and independence, the untouchables, and other contemporary issues including globalization and diaspora. (Formerly titled "Modern India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh").

HIS 3953. Cultures and Empires of the Silk Road, 700 BCE – 1480 CE. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

An examination of the political, military, economic, and cultural interaction of nomadic and sedentary peoples along the northern Silk Road running from Western China through Central Asia to the Black Sea Steppe. Topics may range from the formation of the first powerful nomadic tribal confederations (Scythians, Sarmatians, Huns) in the Iron Age and culminating with the rise of the great Gunpowder Empires of the Ottomans, Timurids, and Moscow tsars in the 14th and 15th centuries.

HIS 3963. Women and Gender in India. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the history of women in the Indian subcontinent from colonial times under British rule to modern independent India. Topics to be discussed and studied include the dowry system, colonial reform movements, education for women, special challenges for Muslim, Christian, and low-caste women, and the nationalist struggle for independence.

HIS 3973. Muslim South Asia: India, Pakistan, Bangladesh. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

This course addresses the development and rise of Muslim nationalism in the Indian subcontinent. Under British colonial rule, Muslims in South Asia began to emerge as a political community, ultimately demanding self-rule under the sovereignty of Pakistan. After a chaotic Partition with India in 1947, Pakistan struggled to achieve cohesion across lines of region, language, and ethnicity. A civil war in 1971 led to the formation of the independent nation of Bangladesh. The class may consider topics of history, culture, gender, class, religion, and economic development for Muslims in South Asia, along with issues of contemporary interest in the region.

HIS 3983. Women and Gender in Latin America. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the role of gender in Latin American history, particularly with respect to the lives of ordinary women. Topics that may be discussed include exploring the changing roles of women over time to see how colonialism and imperialism, the rise of capitalism, and the existence of race/ethnicity and class hierarchies impacted women’s social, economic and political roles. Regional and topical themes may vary. Throughout the course, we will be sensitive to how gender norms informed the ways women and men exercised power as well as the forces that constrained them from using power.

HIS 4133. History and the Public. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Investigation of the status, uses, and value of history in schools and universities, and in other spheres of life. Special interests include public and private roles of scholars and intellectuals, forms of public history, literary and cinematic uses of history, public policy applications, history as social and cultural criticism, and alternative conceptions of history and historians' work.

HIS 4143. History Standards and Their Public Reception. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

This course, intended especially for majors pursuing certification to teach History in the public schools, examines the continuing debate about the articulation of standards for United States and World History instruction in primary and secondary schools. It offers students the opportunity to review the range of specific skills and understandings professional historians have tried to represent in History education. It further identifies the external expectations and pressures upon History instruction in the current day as well as the past. Generally offered: Fall.

HIS 4223. Environmental History of the United States. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

An introductory survey of the interaction of human beings and the environment in the United States from early Indian occupancy to the present. Topics may include problems of ecological change, climate, energy, population, conservation, and human ideas and uses of nature.

HIS 4233. American Society in the 1960s. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the political, cultural, and social developments that shaped American society in the 1960s. Topics will include the emergence of movements for social change, the expansion of the welfare state, the growth of the counterculture, and the Americanization of the war in Vietnam. The course will invite students to move beyond the stereotypes of the 1960s and to explore how different people responded to, participated in, and experienced the changes that occurred in American society during this turbulent decade.

HIS 4603. Issues in History. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Coverage of topics of current interest in the field of history. May be repeated for credit when topics vary, but not more than 6 semester credit hours will apply to a bachelor’s degree. (Formerly HIS 4923).

HIS 4911. Independent Study. (0-0) 1 Credit Hour.

Prerequisites: Permission in writing (form available) from the instructor, the student’s advisor, the Department Chair, and Dean of the College in which the course is offered. Independent reading, research, discussion, and/or writing under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated for credit, but not more than 6 semester credit hours of independent study, regardless of discipline, will apply to a bachelor’s degree.

HIS 4913. Independent Study. (0-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: Permission in writing (form available) from the instructor, the student’s advisor, the Department Chair, and Dean of the College in which the course is offered. Independent reading, research, discussion, and/or writing under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated for credit, but not more than 6 semester credit hours of independent study, regardless of discipline, will apply to a bachelor’s degree.

HIS 4933. Internship in History. (0-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: HIS 2003 and consent of Department Chair. Supervised experience relevant to history within selected community organizations. A maximum of 6 semester credit hours may be earned through Internship in History. Must be taken on a credit/no-credit basis.

HIS 4953. Special Studies in History. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

An organized course offering the opportunity for specialized study not normally or not often available as part of the regular course offerings. Special Studies may be repeated for credit when topics vary, but not more than 6 semester credit hours, regardless of discipline, will apply to a bachelor’s degree. Generally offered: Fall, Spring.

HIS 4973. Seminar in History. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: HIS 2003 with a minimum grade of "C-". The opportunity for an intensive study of a selected topic. Primary emphasis on supervised research on various aspects of the topic. Enrollment limited to juniors and seniors majoring in history. Generally offered: Fall, Spring.

HIS 4993. Honors Thesis. (0-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to candidates for Honors in History during their last two semesters; and/or completion of honors examination and consent of the Honors College. Supervised research and preparation of an honors thesis. May be repeated once with advisor’s approval. Generally offered: Fall, Spring.