Department of Educational Psychology

Mission Statement

The mission of the Department of Educational Psychology is to promote the development and application of scientific knowledge. To do so, our faculty members are committed to: Producing high-quality, innovative research and scholarship; Providing effective and culturally inclusive instructional technologies to prepare practitioners and researchers to use the tools, resources, and strategies necessary to improve the educational experience of all learners; Preparing culturally competent scientist-practitioners and researchers to effectively contribute to the applied psychological development and well-being of children and adolescents; Providing responsive educational and psychological services to the local community, schools, and beyond; Engaging in participatory and leadership roles in local, national, and international institutions and organizations.

The Department of Educational Psychology faculty provide valuable support to other departments and program areas within the College of Education and Human Development and throughout the University by teaching courses based on foundational educational psychology concepts in areas such as learning, motivation, development, assessment, and research methods. At this time, the Department of Educational Psychology offers one graduate degree: the Master of Arts degree in School Psychology. The Department also offers two graduate certificates: Certificate in Applied Behavior Analysis and Certificate in Language Acquisition and Bilingual Psychoeducational Assessment.

Master of Arts Degree in School Psychology

The Master of Arts (M.A.) degree in School Psychology includes advanced coursework and field-based experiences related to psychological assessment, counseling, consultation, learning, development, child psychopathology, research, statistics, and professional issues. Students will also complete a full-time internship in a school setting. The program is designed to provide the academic and practical training necessary to become a Licensed Specialist in School Psychology by the Texas State Board of Examiners of Psychologists. Graduates also will be eligible to apply for certification as a Nationally Certified School Psychologist, which is a nationally-recognized professional certification granted by the National Association of School Psychologists. Due to the clinical nature of this program and number of hours required, the degree does not have a Thesis option.

Program Admission Requirements

The M.A. in School Psychology is designed for students who aspire to practice psychology in educational settings. The number of students admitted to this program may be limited, and admission may be competitive. Admission to the program is based on the following criteria:

  1. Applicants must provide official transcripts indicating a Bachelor’s degree in Psychology, Special Education, Curriculum & Instruction, Sociology, or closely related field from a regionally accredited college or university in the United States, or show proof of equivalent training at a foreign institution.
  2. Acceptance to the M.A. program is contingent on having a grade point average (GPA) of at least 3.0 (on a 4.0 scale) in the last 60 semester credit hours of coursework for the baccalaureate degree, as well as in all graduate-level coursework taken (if applicable).
  3. Applicants must submit an official score on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE; including the Verbal Reasoning, Quantitative Reasoning, and Analytical Writing tests). GRE scores cannot be more than five years old. Applicants must obtain a minimum score of 3.0 on the Analytical Writing test. There is not a cutoff score for the Verbal Reasoning or Quantitative Reasoning tests; rather, scores on these tests will be balanced with GPA and other criteria.
  4. Applicants whose native language is not English must submit an official score on either the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or the International English Language Testing System (IELTS). Minimum scores include a score of at least 550 on the TOEFL paper version, at least 79 on the TOEFL Internet version, or at least 6.5 on the IELTS.
  5. Applicants must provide two letters of recommendation from professional references. Appropriate sources of letters include professors, supervisors, employers, and similar individuals with whom the applicant has a professional relationship. Letters should not be submitted from personal references such as friends or family members. These letters should specifically address the applicant’s academic and/or professional skills, and potential to succeed in a rigorous graduate program.
  6. Applicants must prepare a Statement of Purpose (approximately 500 words) which outlines the applicant’s (1) reasons for pursuing the M.A. degree in School Psychology, (2) experiences relevant to the field of psychology or education, and (3) career plans.
  7. Applicants who lack appropriate academic background in psychology or a closely related field may be admitted conditionally, and specific coursework will be required to address areas of deficiency. The hours of coursework required will be determined on a case-by-case basis between the student and the student’s advisor.

Please note: In addition to the importance of applicants’ other test scores and performance in undergraduate coursework, selection decisions will be strongly influenced by applicants’ writing ability as demonstrated by their Statement of Purpose and score on the GRE Analytical Writing test. Demonstration of writing skills is especially important because success in the field of School Psychology largely depends on these skills, and students will be required to complete a significant amount of writing throughout the School Psychology curriculum.

Interested persons should contact the Student Development Specialist for the School Psychology program or check the Web site for more information.

Degree Requirements

Candidates for the Master of Arts degree in School Psychology must earn a minimum of 66 semester credit hours. Students must pass a comprehensive written examination toward the end of their formal coursework. The examination may be repeated, but students must be registered for coursework at UTSA during the semester in which they take the exam. Thus, students who have finished all of their required coursework but have not passed the comprehensive examination must register for EDP 6961 Comprehensive Examination during the semester in which they take the exam.

The following 66 semester credit hours of coursework are required for all students in the School Psychology program:

EDP 5003Psychological Learning Theories3
EDP 5033Human Development Across the Life Span3
EDP 5053Psychosocial Contexts of Learning3
EDP 5303Principles and Techniques of Evaluation3
EDP 6033Legal, Ethical, and Professional Issues in School Psychology3
EDP 6103Research Methods and Statistics I3
EDP 6203Research Methods and Statistics II3
EDP 6213School Based Counseling Theories3
EDP 6233Mental Health Services in the Schools3
EDP 6243Cognitive Assessment and Intervention3
EDP 6253Academic Assessment and Intervention3
EDP 6263Behavioral Assessment and Intervention3
EDP 6293Consultation in the Schools3
EDP 6343Advanced Psychological Assessment3
EDP 6643Child and Adolescent Psychopathology3
EDP 6703Clinical Neuropsychology3
EDP 6733Multicultural Assessment and Intervention3
EDP 6833Practicum in School Psychology (must be repeated for a total of 6 credit hours)6
EDP 6943Internship in School Psychology (must be repeated for a total of 6 credit hours)6
SPE 5403Survey of Special Education3
Total Credit Hours66

Standards and Procedures

In order to complete the M.A. in School Psychology and to be eligible to take certification or licensing examinations, students must:

  • Maintain scholastic performance, meeting or exceeding department standards.
  • Demonstrate the acquisition of, and ability to apply, skills necessary to work effectively with persons and systems having diverse needs.
  • Demonstrate professionalism in their interactions with others.
  • Conform with the codes of ethics of relevant professional associations in psychology (e.g., National Association of School Psychologists, American Psychological Association) in addition to the ethical and legal regulations relevant to the practice of psychology in the State of Texas (e.g., Texas Administrative Code, Rules and Regulations of the Texas State Board of Examiners of Psychologists).

It is the duty of faculty members in the School Psychology program to evaluate all students according to these standards in all settings in which faculty members and students interact, including classes, practicum and internship sites, advising, and supervision. It is expected that students will respond to evaluations, formal or informal, in appropriate ways and will attempt to conform to professional standards as explained to them.

Admission to the program does not guarantee fitness to remain in the program to completion. Only those students who consistently meet program standards will be allowed to continue in the program. If and when a student is judged not to meet program standards sufficiently to be allowed to provide psychological services to others, that student will be removed from continuation in the program.

Only two courses with the grade of “C” (defined as grades of “C” or “C+”) will be accepted toward this degree. A minimum of a 3.0 grade point average will be required for graduation. Those who obtain more than two grades of “C” will be put on probation and may be required to complete appropriate remedial work.

Graduate Certificate in Applied Behavior Analysis

The Applied Behavior Analysis certificate is offered through collaboration with the Department of Interdisciplinary Learning and Teaching. Admission, advising, and review of academic progress are conducted through the Department of Educational Psychology. This 15-semester-credit-hour certificate in Applied Behavior Analysis is designed to meet the needs of current and prospective students interested in developing basic skills in applied behavior analysis. The certificate is available to students who have been admitted as special students and seek the certificate independent of a degree as well as master’s degree students.

This certificate is designed to provide students with focused training in the area of applied behavior analysis as it relates to educational psychology and special education. The certificate provides educators with specialized skills in the application of behavior analysis to support the social behavior needs of students. The certificate coursework provides students with a strong background in behavioral theory and principles as well as the skills to apply this learning to relevant contexts (e.g., educational settings, clinic settings, home settings). In addition, completion of the coursework linked with the certificate will meet the coursework requirements set forth by the Behavior Analyst Certification Board, Inc. (BACB®).

The following departmental requirements are applicable to the Certificate in Applied Behavior Analysis:

  • A bachelor’s degree from an accredited university in an approved area of study (e.g., psychology, education).
  • A minimum grade point average (GPA) of 3.0 for the last two years of work toward the bachelor’s degree.
  • To maintain enrollment in the certificate program, students should maintain a 3.0 GPA throughout their tenure in the program.
  • Submission of the Applied Behavior Analysis Certificate Supplemental Information Form.

To meet the curricular requirements for the Graduate Certificate in Applied Behavior Analysis students must complete 15 semester credit hours with a grade point average of 3.0 or above from the following courses:

A. 9 semester credit hours of required courses:9
Psychological Learning Theories (with BCBA approved instructor-confirm section with advisor)
Behavioral Assessment and Intervention
Applied Behavior Analysis for Classroom Teachers
B. 6 semester credit hours of practicum through EDP or SPE:6
Practicum in School Psychology (must be repeated for a total of 6 hours)
OR
Practicum in Special Education: Children and Youth with Disabilities
   and Practicum in Special Education: Individuals with Behavior Problems
Total Credit Hours15

Students seeking admission to the certificate program who are not enrolled in a graduate degree program will be required to apply to the Graduate School as special graduate students and indicate that they are seeking admission to the Graduate Certificate Program in Applied Behavior Analysis. All other requirements for admission as a special graduate student described in Chapter 1, Admission, of this catalog are applicable.

All other requirements for certificate programs described in Chapter 3, Certificate Programs, of this catalog apply to this program.

Students should see an advisor if they are interested in becoming eligible to take the Board Certified Behavior Analysis (BCBA) Examination. An advisor will provide further instructions about the requirements for the BCBA.

Graduate Certificate in Language Acquisition and Bilingual Psychoeducational Assessment

The LABPA certificate is offered through the Department of Educational Psychology (EDP) with support from the Department of Bicultural-Bilingual Studies (BBL). Both Departments reside in the College of Education and Human Development. 

This 15-hour certificate in Language Acquisition and Bilingual Psychoeducational Assessment (LABPA) is designed to meet the needs of prospective students interested in developing skills in bilingual psychoeducational assessment and foundational knowledge in language acquisition and the bilingualism continuum, with an emphasis on Spanish-speaking English Language Learners (ELLs). The purpose is to increase the utilization of best practices in bilingual psychoeducational assessment based upon an understanding of language acquisition. Best practices incorporate knowledge of tests of cognitive and achievement abilities, of tests of language proficiency, and bilingualism and language acquisition. The goal is to improve the educational experience, educational planning, provision of special education services, and overall well-being of ELL children, and youth in general.

Admission Requirements

  • A bachelor’s degree from an accredited university in an approved area of study (e.g., psychology, education), or
  • A master’s or doctoral degree from an accredited university in an approved area of study (e.g., school psychology, counseling psychology, educational diagnostician) or clinical psychology with completion of graduate-level coursework in academic assessment and cognitive assessment, or
  • Current Educational Diagnostic Certificate
  • Attainment of passing grade on a mandated Spanish proficiency test (e.g., Texas Bilingual (Spanish) Target Language Proficiency Test or designated University (ALPS) Spanish Proficiency Test)

Note: Appropriate coursework in areas of Cognitive Assessment and Academic Assessment includes graduate-level coursework that integrates the administration, scoring, and interpretation of commonly used measures (e.g., WISC-V, WIAT-III, WJ-IV Tests of Cognitive Abilities and of Achievement) within these domains. These courses are typically completed after students have completed coursework on the principles and techniques of evaluation, including principles of psychological and educational measurement, statistical and psychometric concepts, and the development and selection of assessment instruments related to a range of psychological constructs. Completion of appropriate coursework should be documented by course syllabi indicating training in these areas.

Although coursework will be offered in English, students must have the ability to administer Spanish-language tests of language proficiency, academic achievement, and cognitive abilities. The attainment of a passing grade on a state-mandated Spanish proficiency test pertains to this requirement.

Once admitted, the student will contact the Certificate Program Advisor and complete a form requesting permission to enter and complete the certificate program. The LABPA Program Advisor and the Dean of the College of Education and Human Development will sign the form.  A copy of this form will be sent to the Graduate School. 

Certificate Requirements

Requirements for completion include:

  1. Completion of 15 graduate hours of approved UTSA coursework with a grade point average (GPA) of 3.0 or above.
  2. Completion of a language acquisition and bilingual psychoeducational assessment project portfolio.
  3. Maintain a 3.0 GPA throughout tenure in the program.
A. EDP Required Courses:9
Advanced Psychological Assessment
Multicultural Assessment and Intervention
Practicum in School Psychology
B. BBL Required Courses:6
Assessment in Bilingual and ESL Programs
Foundations of Second Language Acquisition
Bilingualism and Second Language Acquisition
Total Credit Hours15

Educational Psychology (EDP) Courses

EDP 5003. Psychological Learning Theories. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Provides a current and comprehensive overview of theory and research related to learning. Covers topics such as behaviorism, social cognitive theory, information processing, constructivism and motivation. Explores applications of learning principles in multiple contexts including classroom and virtual learning environments. Appropriate for students in all areas of graduate study.

EDP 5033. Human Development Across the Life Span. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Provides comprehensive overview of relevant research and theoretical frameworks of human development across the life span. Topics include cognitive, social, emotional, and sociocultural development as it exists in various contexts including schools, communities and families. Appropriate for students in all areas of graduate study.

EDP 5043. Classroom Management and Motivation. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

A detailed investigation of various theories and models of classroom management and motivation. Topics include behavior modification, assertive discipline, control theory, and the concept of the democratic classroom. (Same as C&I 5043. Credit cannot be earned for both EDP 5043 and C&I 5043.).

EDP 5053. Psychosocial Contexts of Learning. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Provides theory and research related to the “informal curriculum,” defined as those aspects of educational life that are separate from the traditional goal of academic achievement. Course allows students to explore personal beliefs about the goals of schooling and/or workplace learning.

EDP 5273. Child Development. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Course addresses classic and current conceptual methodological approaches to the social-scientific study of child development. Emphasis will include an examination of historical, theoretical, sociocultural and methodological issues central to child development.

EDP 5303. Principles and Techniques of Evaluation. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Introduces the study of assessment and evaluation, including classical test theory, principles of psychological and educational measurement (including methods of establishing evidence for reliability and validity), statistical and psychometric concepts, the development and selection of assessment instruments related to a range of psychological constructs, and techniques for interpreting and communicating evaluation results.

EDP 5313. Assessment and Evaluation for Educators. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Course addresses principles and techniques necessary to develop sound assessment tools and strategies for evaluating student learning. Primary course focus will be on the creation of objective and performance assessments, administration procedures, classroom evaluation and the role of testing, measurement and evaluation in instructional practice.

EDP 5323. Educational Measurement and Assessment in Special Education. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Introduces principles of educational measurement necessary to develop sound assessment tools and strategies for students with disabilities. Primary course focus will be on approaches for making reliable and valid decisions based upon sound measurement theory, including methods for establishing evidence of reliability and validity, statistical and psychometric concepts, the development and selection of assessment instruments related to academic and behavioral constructs, and techniques for interpreting and communicating evaluation results.

EDP 5333. Adolescent Development. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Course addresses classic and current conceptual methodological approaches to social-scientific study of adolescent development. Emphasis will include an examination of historical, theoretical, sociocultural and methodological issues central to adolescent development.

EDP 5343. Instructional Design Theory. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: IST 5003 or consent of instructor. An investigation of theories, principles, and processes of instructional and digital learning design including their application to instructional product and curriculum development. (Same as IST 5343. Credit cannot be earned for both IST 5343 and EDP 5343.).

EDP 5503. Applied Behavior Analysis for Classroom Teachers. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: SPE 5403, SPE 5513, SPE 6403 or EDP 6403 and SPE 6623 or consent of instructor. This course will provide students with the opportunity to acquire knowledge about principles and procedures of applied behavior analysis and classroom management for teachers. As an introductory course to behavior analysis, special attention will be paid to philosophy, terminology, and methods. In addition, ethical considerations for those delivering behavior analytic services will be discussed. Assessments will be modeled after the BCBA certification exam. Requires an applied project. (Formerly EDP 5423. Same as SPE 5503. Credit cannot be earned for more than one of the following: EDP 5423, EDP 5503, or SPE 5503.).

EDP 5603. Psychology of Human Motivation. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of the instructor. Explores the study of human motivation from a variety of approaches including educational, psychological and social-historical. The goal of the course is to help students develop foundational understandings of how various motivational theories relate to the teaching and learning processes in a variety of educational contexts.

EDP 5633. Instruction and Educational Interventions for Individuals with Mild/Moderate Disabilities. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: SPE 5403, SPE 5503 or EDP 5503, SPE 6403 or EDP 6403, and SPE 6623 or consent of instructor. This course will provide students with the opportunity to acquire knowledge about evidenced-based instructional practices for teaching individuals with mild/moderate intellectual disabilities. Students will have the opportunity to learn to design appropriate instructional interventions, how to apply those interventions, and to make decisions based on student data to inform future instructional practices. (Same as SPE 5633. Credit cannot be earned for both SPE 5633 and EDP 5633.).

EDP 5643. Instruction and Educational Interventions for Individuals with Moderate/Severe Disabilities. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: SPE 5403, SPE 5503 or EDP 5503, SPE 5513, SPE 6403 or EDP 6403, and SPE 6623 or consent of instructor. This course will provide students with the opportunity to acquire knowledge about evidenced-based instructional practices for teaching individuals with moderate/severe intellectual disabilities. Students will have the opportunity to learn to design appropriate instructional interventions, how to apply those interventions, and make decisions based on student data to inform future instructional practices. (Same as SPE 5643. Credit cannot be earned for both SPE 5643 and EDP 5643.).

EDP 6033. Legal, Ethical, and Professional Issues in School Psychology. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to the School Psychology program. Review of historical foundations of school psychology; legal, ethical, and credentialing issues in school psychology; scholarly writing and library research skills; models of psychological service delivery; professional role and function of the school psychologist; professional standards and organizations in school psychology.

EDP 6103. Research Methods and Statistics I. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

This course covers an overview of research design and introductory statistical concepts used in behavioral research. Thus students will focus on developing an understanding of evidence-based inquiry, experimental validity, sampling procedures, and basic descriptive and comparative research designs. Students will be introduced to probability and sampling distributions, the major theoretical distributions referenced in behavioral research (the Binomial distribution, the Chi-Square distribution, and the Gaussian distribution) and classical tests ( t-tests). Students will use these concepts to read, interpret, and evaluate educational and psychological research. (Formerly titled “Methods and Techniques of Inquiry I.”).

EDP 6203. Research Methods and Statistics II. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Building on concepts from Research Methods and Statistics I, this course covers specific experimental (true-experimental design, quasi-experimental design) and non-experimental research designs (ex-post facto research design.) Topics covered include correlation, regression, sampling error, various t-statistics, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and factor analysis. Students will use these concepts to read, interpret, and evaluate educational and psychological research. (Formerly titled “Methods and Techniques of Inquiry II.”).

EDP 6213. School Based Counseling Theories. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to the School Psychology program. This course covers selected psychotherapeutic and counseling theories for the treatment of children and adolescents experiencing emotional and behavioral disorders/disruptions that interfere with learning. Topics include: behavioral approaches, cognitive-behavioral, choice theory, play-based and other related group and individual theoretically based therapies. Emphasis is placed on empirically-supported theory in relation to services within a school system framework.

EDP 6223. Research in Single Case Design. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides an overview of basic single-subject design methods and procedures. Topics include critical analysis of single subject research design, issues related to conducting and analyzing single subject research in applied settings, as well as institutional review process and ethical consideration. Students will use these concepts to read, interpret, evaluate, and conduct applied research.

EDP 6233. Mental Health Services in the Schools. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: EDP 6213. This course will cover selected psychotherapeutic and comprehensive intervention approaches for treating childhood and adolescent emotional and behavioral disorders that interfere with learning. Topics include play therapy, solution-focused strategies, cognitive-behavioral techniques, group and individual therapies, case management, involvement of the family and other service providers, and crisis response. Emphasis will be placed on empirically-supported services within a school systemic framework.

EDP 6243. Cognitive Assessment and Intervention. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: EDP 5303 or equivalent. Examines educational and clinical applications of individual assessment; specific diagnostic measures of intelligence and cognitive abilities; supervised instruction in administration, scoring, and interpretation; and using cognitive assessment results to inform intervention. Videotaping and direct observation of test administration is required for purposes of supervision and self-evaluation. (Formerly titled “Assessment of Intelligence and Achievement.”) (Credit cannot be earned for both EDP 6243 and SPE 5533.).

EDP 6253. Academic Assessment and Intervention. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: EDP 5303. Examines educational and clinical applications of individual achievement assessment within the context of response-to-intervention; specific diagnostic measures of academic skills, including curriculum-based assessment; supervised instruction in administration, scoring, and interpretation; and using academic assessment results to inform intervention. Videotaping and direct observation of test administration is required for purposes of supervision and self-evaluation.

EDP 6263. Behavioral Assessment and Intervention. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: EDP 5003 and EDP 5303 or equivalent. Examines behavioral learning theory and operant conditioning principles; overview of behavioral assessment strategies with an emphasis on conducting interviews and direct observations of behaviors; functional behavior assessment and applied behavior analysis as systematic assessment-intervention approaches to behavior modification; and specific behavior intervention approaches for use with children and adolescents.

EDP 6293. Consultation in the Schools. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: EDP 6103 and EDP 6203. Examines the role of consultation within the practice of school psychology, major theoretical models of consultation, specific approaches to service delivery, and ethical issues related to consultation. This course also includes methods of evaluating consultation outcomes at the individual student level, in addition to methods of program evaluation. Requires the application of theoretical material to case studies.

EDP 6343. Advanced Psychological Assessment. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: EDP 5303, and EDP 6243. Theory and application of specific instruments and techniques, including administration and scoring. Emphasis on analysis, interpretation, and integration of intelligence, achievement, emotional, behavioral, and personality assessment results for diagnostics as well as treatment planning. Casework is required. (Formerly EDP 6323. Credit cannot be earned for both EDP 6323 and EDP 6343.) (The content of this course differs from that of COU 6323, Advanced Psychological Assessment, and the two courses are not equivalent.).

EDP 6403. Culturally Responsive Teaching and Collaboration. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: SPE 5403 and SPE 6623 or consent of instructor. This course will provide students with the opportunity to acquire knowledge in relation to cultural changes experienced in schools. Additionally the course will provide students with an opportunity to gain insight on cultural diversity, characteristics of diverse students and family. (Same as SPE 6403. Credit cannot be earned for both SPE 6403 and EDP 6403.).

EDP 6423. Development of Girls and Women. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Course examines the theoretical approaches of development for girls and women. Focus will be placed on feminist theories and development, socialization of women, and sociocultural factors contributing to prevalent disorders among females (anxiety and phobias, eating disorders, dealing with violence and abuse, coping with stress, etc.).

EDP 6643. Child and Adolescent Psychopathology. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: EDP 5033 or equivalent. Course addresses DSM classification to discuss major emotional and behavioral disorders experienced by nonadult populations. Current state of knowledge with regard to the characteristics, etiological factors, and developmental outcomes of psychological disorders of childhood and adolescence will be considered.

EDP 6703. Clinical Neuropsychology. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: EDP 5303, EDP 6243, and EDP 6833. Review of brain-behavior relationships and biological substrates of behavior; physiological bases of neuropsychological constructs such as executive function, attention, perception, memory, learning, emotions, and behavior; review of selected neurobehavioral and genetic disorders in children, with emphasis on cognitive, behavioral, and emotional sequelae of these disorders. Includes coverage of relevant neuropsychological assessment methods.

EDP 6733. Multicultural Assessment and Intervention. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: EDP 5303, EDP 6643, and EDP 6833. Course provides theory and research related to assessment and intervention needs found with cultural diversity. Structured as a seminar, discussions include professional issues, trends, testing and assessment issues, intervention theories and techniques with regard to multiculturalism and cultural diversity.

EDP 6833. Practicum in School Psychology. (0-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: Completion of Practicum Form indicating required coursework has been completed, and consent of instructor. Supervised field-based experience in approved public school and mental health settings in school psychology. Supervision provided by on-site supervisors and university faculty. Emphasis is on orientation to school settings; learning the role of the school psychologist within the larger context; evaluation of psychological and academic difficulties; consultation with parents and teachers; and direct counseling interventions with students. May be repeated for up to 6 hours credit.

EDP 6891. Field Experience in Behavioral Analysis. (0-0) 1 Credit Hour.

Supervised field-based applied research experience in approved school and clinic settings. Emphasis is on orientation to behavior analysis in applied settings, learning the role of a behavior consultant within larger systems, implementation and evaluation of behavioral interventions for students struggling with problem behaviors. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of credit.

EDP 6943. Internship in School Psychology. (0-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: Completion of Internship Form indicating required coursework has been completed, and consent of instructor. Full-time, supervised field-based experience in approved professional employment settings in school psychology. Supervision provided by on-site supervisors and university faculty. Students will complete a minimum of 600 clock hours of clinical work per semester, during which they will integrate and apply knowledge gained through coursework and begin to develop a professional identity. Can be taken only when all other required coursework in the School Psychology program has been completed. May be repeated for up to 6 hours credit.

EDP 6951. Independent Study. (0-0) 1 Credit Hour.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission in writing (form available) of the instructor and the student’s Graduate Advisor of Record. Independent reading, research, discussion, and/or writing under the direction of a faculty member. For students needing specialized work not normally or not often available as part of the regular course offerings. May be repeated for credit, but no more than 6 hours, regardless of discipline, will apply to the Master’s degree.

EDP 6953. Independent Study. (0-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission in writing (form available) of the instructor and the student’s Graduate Advisor of Record. Independent reading, research, discussion, and/or writing under the direction of a faculty member. For students needing specialized work not normally or not often available as part of the regular course offerings. May be repeated for credit, but no more than 6 hours, regardless of discipline, will apply to the Master’s degree.

EDP 6961. Comprehensive Examination. (0-0) 1 Credit Hour.

Prerequisite: Approval of the Graduate Program Committee to take the Comprehensive Examination. Independent study course for the purpose of taking the Comprehensive Examination. May be repeated as many times as approved by the Graduate Program Committee. Enrollment is required each term in which the Comprehensive Examination is taken if no other courses are being taken that term. The grade report for the course is either “CR” (satisfactory performance on the Comprehensive Examination) or “NC” (unsatisfactory performance on the Comprehensive Examination).

EDP 6973. Special Issues. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. An organized course offering the opportunity for specialized study not normally or not often available as part of the regular course offerings. Special Issues courses may be repeated for credit when topics vary, but no more than 6 hours, regardless of discipline, will apply to the Master’s degree.

EDP 6991. Independent Study in School Psychology Internship. (0-0) 1 Credit Hour.

Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in EDP 6943 and consent of instructor. Independent reading, research, and/or writing under the direction of a faculty member. This Independent Study is restricted to students currently enrolled in Internship in School Psychology, and may involve the detailed analysis of a critical problem, issue, or research question related to the professional practice of School Psychology. May be repeated for credit, but no more than 6 hours, regardless of discipline, will apply to the Master’s degree.