College of Architecture, Construction and Planning

Master of Science Degree in Facility Management

The Master of Science degree in Facility Management is a 100% online program, designed to educate and equip graduate-level facility management students with advanced facilities management knowledge and skills to enhance their performance, capabilities, and increase their professional qualifications. Students who complete the M.S. degree in Facility Management will be prepared to make an immediate positive impact that supports and advances the profession.

Admission Requirements

Applicants must satisfy University-wide graduate admission requirements.

A complete application package consists of the following:

  • Completed Application form
  • Official transcripts from all universities attended
  • Resume detailing your facilities management experience
  • Two Letters of Recommendation (recommended)
  • Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) scores for international applicants whose first language is not English

Applicants for this program must have a bachelor’s or master’s degree in engineering, architecture, sciences, business, or other facility management related field or discipline. Practicing facility managers with at least two years of experience in facility management and a bachelor’s degree in other fields will also be admitted to the program, with approval of the program coordinator.

Applicants may be admitted as unconditional or conditional, degree-seeking graduate students, or as special graduate students. Admission as a special graduate (non-degree-seeking) student does not guarantee subsequent admission as a degree-seeking ­student; such students must reapply for degree-seeking status.

Degree Requirements

The minimum number of semester credit hours required for the Master of Science degree in Facility Management, exclusive of coursework or other study required to remove deficiencies is 30. The program is offered in a non-thesis option only. 

Degree candidates must complete the following 30 semester credit hours of coursework:

Required courses:
FM 5003Facilities Management Professional Trends3
FM 5113Operations and Maintenance: Management of Built Assets3
FM 5213Project Management: Planning and Execution of Projects3
FM 5313Finance and Business: Financial Aspects of Facilities3
FM 5413Leadership and Strategy: Facilities Management Leadership3
FM 5513Energy, Utilities and Environmental Stewardship:3
FM 5613Human Factors and Resources in Facilities Management3
FM 5713Quality, Productivity and Technology in Facility Management3
FM 5813Environmental Health, Safety, Risk Management, and Business3
FM 5903Graduate Capstone Project – Solving Problems in Facilities3
Total Credit Hours30

Master of Science Degree in Urban and Regional Planning

The Master of Science degree in Urban and Regional Planning is designed to prepare students for leadership roles and careers in the public and private sectors planning and designing communities and regions. The degree is in collaboration with the Department of Architecture in the College of Architecture, Construction and Planning, and the Department of Public Administration in the College for Health, Community and Policy. The program offers two specializations–Urban Policy, and Urban Design–though students may graduate as generalist planners with no prescribed specialization. The program’s primary focus is to prepare students to become practitioners in the planning profession and takes an interdisciplinary perspective on understanding modern urban challenges, including growth management, equitable development, healthy cities, placemaking, transportation, and community development. Emphasis is placed upon developing research and analytic communication skills in the classroom, with professional practice skills developed through engaged learning experiences.

Admission Requirements

Applicants must satisfy University-wide graduate admission requirements.

A complete application package consists of the following:

  • Completed Application form
  • Official transcripts from all universities attended
  • Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores required if undergraduate GPA is below 3.00 out of 4.00
  • Two Letters of Recommendation addressing the applicant’s academic and/or professional skills
  • Letter of Intent, outlining the applicant’s reasons for pursuing the Master of Science degree in Urban and Regional Planning and career plans
  • Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) scores for international applicants whose first language is not English

Applicants may be admitted as unconditional or conditional, degree-seeking graduate students, or as special graduate students. Admission as a special graduate (non-degree-seeking) student does not guarantee subsequent admission as a degree-seeking ­student; such students must reapply for degree-seeking status.

An application fee and all application materials must be sent directly to the UTSA Graduate School at One UTSA Circle, San Antonio, TX 78249. Please consult the College of Architecture, Construction and Planning website for applicable dates when the review of applications will begin and for more information about the College and its programs.

Degree Requirements

The minimum number of semester credit hours required for the Master of Science degree in Urban and Regional Planning, exclusive of coursework or other study required to remove deficiencies is 48. Students may pursue a thesis or non-thesis option.

Degree candidates must complete 48 semester credit hours of coursework consisting of the following requirements:

A. 27 semester credit hours of the following required courses:
1. 21 semester credit hours of the following required courses:21
Introduction to Urban and Regional Planning
History and Theory of Urban and Regional Planning
Urban Planning Methods I
Urban Planning Methods II
Public Participation and Qualitative Analysis
Planning Practice and Ethics
Urban and Regional Sustainability
Planning Workshop
2. 6 semester credit hours of public administration courses in the College for Health, Community and Policy:6
Planning and Land Use Law
Urban and Regional Economic Development
B. 15 semester credit hours of electives, chosen in consultation with and approved by the Urban and Regional Planning Graduate Advisor of Record to meet degree candidates’ individual needs. Students can select an area of specialization or take courses from a variety of areas that pertain to urban and regional planning. Electives may also be taken in other graduate programs with approval of the Graduate Advisor. The specialization areas include: Urban Policy, and Urban Design.15
To satisfy the major area coursework for the urban policy specialization, a student must complete 12 semester credit hours from the following public administration courses from the Department of Public Administration in the College for Health, Community and Policy:
Introduction to Public Service Leadership and Management
Urban Management
Public Policy Analysis
Public Policy Process
Land Use Policy
To satisfy the major area coursework for the urban design specialization, a student must complete 12 semester credit hours from the following courses:
GIS for Urban Studies
Site Planning and Design
Graphic Communication for Planners
Special Topics (Urban Design Studio)
Current Issues and Topics in Contemporary Architecture (content approved by GAR)
Environmental Architecture and Sustainability
Cultural Landscapes and Urban Conservation
Sustainable Tourism Development
Special Topics (content approved by GAR)
C. 6 semester credit hours of the following “capstone” coursework consisting of either the Thesis or Non-Thesis Option described below.6
Thesis Option Requirements: All candidates for the Master of Science degree in Urban and Regional Planning with a thesis option must complete 6 semester credit hours of URP 6983 Master’s Thesis (includes thesis defense/seminar presentation).
Non-Thesis Option Requirements: All candidates for the Master of Science degree in Urban and Regional Planning with a non-thesis option must complete 6 semester credit hours from the following: URP 6933 Planning Professional Report, and either URP 6943 Professional Internship, or an additional 3 hours of URP 5483 Planning Workshop.
D. Degree candidates in the thesis option and non-thesis option are required to pass a written comprehensive examination, and enroll in URP 6961 Comprehensive Examination if no other courses are being taken that term.
Total Credit Hours48

Graduate Certificate in Facility Management

The graduate certificate in Facility Management is a 100% online, 15-semester-credit-hour certificate program, designed to educate and equip graduate-level facility management students with advanced facilities management knowledge and skills to enhance their performance, capabilities, and increase their professional qualifications. Students who complete the Facility Management graduate certificate will be prepared to make an immediate positive impact that supports and advances the profession.

Admission Requirements

Applicants for this program must have a bachelor’s or master’s degree in engineering, architecture, sciences, business, or other facility management related field or discipline. Practicing facility managers with at least two years of experience in facility management and a bachelor’s degree in other fields will also be admitted to the program, with approval of the program coordinator.

Applicants will apply for admission to the certificate as a special (non-degree-seeking) graduate student according to UTSA's admission requirements for certificate programs (see Certificate Program Regulations in this catalog). Additionally, applicants will be required to submit a resume detailing their facilities management experience.

Certificate Program Requirements

To satisfy the requirements for the Graduate Certificate in Facility Management, students must complete 15 semester credit hours as follows:

A. 15 semester credit hours of the following required courses:15
Facilities Management Professional Trends
Operations and Maintenance: Management of Built Assets
Project Management: Planning and Execution of Projects
Finance and Business: Financial Aspects of Facilities
Leadership and Strategy: Facilities Management Leadership
Total Credit Hours15

To maintain enrollment in the certificate program, students should maintain a 3.0 grade point average throughout tenure in the program.

Graduate Certificate in Urban and Regional Planning

The purpose of the professional certificate in Urban and Regional Planning is to provide students with an introductory understanding of the historical, social, international, and physical context of comprehensive land use planning and sustainable urbanism.

The Certificate in Urban and Regional Planning is a 15-semester-credit-hour program. Degree-seeking or special graduate students from any discipline at UTSA are allowed to complete the Certificate in Urban and Regional Planning (URP) program. Students will be advised by the URP Certificate Program Coordinator/Advisor. Interested individuals should contact the Urban and Regional Planning Certificate Program Coordinator within the College of Architecture, Construction and Planning.

Admission Requirements

New and existing graduate students in “good standing” shall declare the intent to seek the Certificate by requesting permission to enter and complete the program. Students not currently enrolled in a graduate program may apply according to UTSA admission requirements for certificate programs (see Certificate Program Regulations in this catalog). The Certificate Program Coordinator may determine that a student requires prerequisite background courses to adequately prepare for the courses of the Graduate Certificate Program.

Certificate Program Requirements

The Urban and Regional Planning Certificate curriculum consists of 9 semester credit hours of required planning courses and 6 elective hours. A minimum of one-half of all credits counted towards the certificate must be taken in Urban and Regional Planning. Courses taken for the Graduate Certificate in Urban and Regional Planning can be applied toward the Master of Science in Urban and Regional Planning, Master of Architecture, and Master of Science in Architecture degrees. Students will be advised by the Urban and Regional Planning Certificate Program Coordinator/Advisor.

A. 6 semester credit hours of the following required courses:6
Introduction to Urban and Regional Planning
History and Theory of Urban and Regional Planning
Planning and Land Use Law
B. 9 semester credit hours of graduate elective courses approved by the Urban and Regional Planning Graduate Advisor9
Total Credit Hours15

Facility and Property Management (FM) Courses

FM 5003. Facilities Management Professional Trends. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Course includes an in‐depth analysis of the most common practices of Facility and Property Managers, including sustainability issues, environmental factors, buildings safety, leasing activities, building technologies, continuous quality improvement, and FM and real estate trends and practices.

FM 5113. Operations and Maintenance: Management of Built Assets. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Course provides in‐depth discussion of Facility and Property Management Operations and Maintenance, including building systems, and approaches to operating and maintaining facilities, the effective development and management of facilities predictive, preventive, and corrective maintenance programs, and other aspects of FM maintenance and operations.

FM 5213. Project Management: Planning and Execution of Projects. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Course provides in‐depth discussion of facilities project management from initial project planning, estimating and scope definition, through design and construction to project close out. Course includes project manager roles and responsibilities, project processes and life cycles, programming, scope, design deliverables, project plans, critical path method project scheduling and control, and project oversight from start to finish.

FM 5313. Finance and Business: Financial Aspects of Facilities. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Course includes analysis, budgeting, accounting, risk management & reporting to demonstrate applications of facility financial management to prepare students to analyze & interpret financial statements to make FM decisions, and understand & apply accounting and finance principles to facility management business operations, and manage facilities financial and other high value assets to effectively deliver facility services.

FM 5413. Leadership and Strategy: Facilities Management Leadership. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Course provides fundamental FM leadership concepts and practices from strategic facility planning, development and execution of facility services, effective leadership of the facility organization, appropriate methods of measuring and evaluating facility performance, identification of root causes of negative performance and ways to continuously improve performance with a focus on performance excellence.

FM 5513. Energy, Utilities and Environmental Stewardship:. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Course provides students an understanding of operational energy and utility system management in the context of the built environment, and equips students to understand and implement energy and utility conservation measures, and sustainability initiatives to reduce institutional carbon footprint and enhance stewardship of the natural environment. Course includes discussion of energy management systems, Energy Star and STARS assessments and ratings, energy calculations, energy efficiency programs, commissioning and retro‐commissioning, energy and utility audits, and FM sustainability practices and trends.

FM 5613. Human Factors and Resources in Facilities Management. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Course introduces students to occupancy and human resources management in a facilities management organization, including space management, staff recruitment, hiring, job families and career paths, training and skill development, advancement, performance management, retention and termination, safety and security, and current regulatory environment. Also includes discussion of outsourcing issues, and "To‐do‐or‐buy" analysis to aide in decision making related to potential outsourcing of facility functions.

FM 5713. Quality, Productivity and Technology in Facility Management. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Course will provide foundational concepts relating to facility management technology and how it is used to assure quality, productivity and operational excellence in facility operations. Includes the use technology, quality assurance, economics and life‐cycle cost analysis and performance measurement and operational reporting to advance the productivity of facilities staff and provide customers and stakeholders with excellence in FM Services.

FM 5813. Environmental Health, Safety, Risk Management, and Business. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Course will provide students an understanding of environmental health, safety, and risk management issues in the built environment and equip them to effectively develop and implement emergency management and business continuity plans, and respond to workplace emergencies and other contingencies impacting the ability of the organization to perform its mission.

FM 5903. Graduate Capstone Project – Solving Problems in Facilities. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: FM 5003, FM 5113, FM 5213, FM 5313, FM 5413, FM 5513, FM 5613, FM 5713, and FM 5813. Capstone course will be a student‐led effort to identify a significant facility management challenge, analyze causes and impacts of the challenge, consider various solution options, and implications of each, and develop a thoughtful and effective solution to address the challenge. Includes the study of formal problem solving principles, and presentation of multi‐media findings to address all aspects of the challenge and solution to executive leadership.

Urban and Regional Planning (URP) Courses

URP 5213. Social Justice in the City. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. Examines spatial inequality particularly in distressed communities. Emphasis is placed on residential segregation, the deconcentration of poverty, and policies and programs that perpetuate spatial inequalities and promote the geographies of opportunity. Differential Tuition: $165.

URP 5223. Community Development Finance. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. Provides a general understanding of economic development and real estate finance. Students learn about a developer’s pro forma income and expense statement, calculating debt service and the return on investment, discounted cash flow analysis, underwriting practices, deal structuring, and financing project gaps. Programs such as CDBG, new market tax credits, the low-income housing tax credit program, and historic rehabilitation tax credits are introduced. Real world case studies are explored throughout the course to understand how federal, state, and local government funding sources can be used with private sector resources to finance community-based projects. Differential Tuition: $165.

URP 5233. GIS for Urban Studies. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. Provides a basic understanding of spatial analysis using geographic information systems. Emphasis is placed on analyzing urban issues with GIS tools. Topics include mapping density and change, measuring geographic distributions, and analyzing patterns and clusters. Differential Tuition: $165.

URP 5313. Urban Housing Policy and Analysis. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. An examination of the evolution of housing and neighborhood design and planning with emphasis on sustainable planning and design methods, and solutions. (Formerly ARC 5313. Credit cannot be earned for both URP 5313 and ARC 5313. Formerly titled “Housing Design and Neighborhood Planning.”) Differential Tuition: $165.

URP 5333. Introduction to Urban and Regional Planning. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. This course explores the theory and practice of land use planning in local, regional, and state-level planning in the United States. This course deals with the institutional environment in which planning occurs, and the methods planners must know to create and implement a comprehensive plan. It will cover the topics of zoning and subdivision regulations, long-range comprehensive plan, and basic principles of functional plans, area plans, site plans, and form-based codes. (Formerly ARC 5333. Credit cannot be earned for both URP 5333 and ARC 5333.) Differential Tuition: $165.

URP 5343. History and Theory of Urban and Regional Planning. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. This course reviews the origins and evolution of thought and action in planning, including post-colonial perspectives. Students have the opportunity to explore theory in planning contexts for practical application and research. (Formerly ARC 5343. Credit cannot be earned for both URP 5343 and ARC 5343.) Differential Tuition: $165.

URP 5353. Structure and Function of Cities and Regions. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. A study of the social, political, economic, and changing physical design, form, and infrastructure of cities and regions. (Formerly ARC 5353. Credit cannot be earned for both URP 5353 and ARC 5353.) Differential Tuition: $165.

URP 5363. Urban Planning Methods I. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. Introduction to research design in urban planning and basic exploratory analytic tools. Topics include: data gathering and management, demographic and employment analysis and forecasting, literature gathering and synthesis, visualization, database graphics, and GIS for applications in urban and regional planning with an emphasis on how these inform question formation. (Formerly ARC 5363. Credit cannot be earned for both URP 5363 and ARC 5363. Formerly titled “Intermediate Urban Planning Methods.”) Differential Tuition: $165.

URP 5373. Site Planning and Design. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. This course will introduce students to site planning as both a design activity and also as a nexus of principles and issues that are central to the profession of urban planning. Through this course, students will have an opportunity to learn how to use various planning software to conduct land suitability and site analysis, and build-out analysis. For the final project, students will develop a site plan visualizing the arrangements of buildings, structure, infrastructure, and landscape based on local zoning, subdivision, and land development ordinances. (Formerly ARC 5373. Credit cannot be earned for both URP 5373 and ARC 5373.) Differential Tuition: $165.

URP 5383. Planning and Housing for Rural Communities. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. A survey of the comprehensive planning of small towns and housing in rural areas. Includes consideration of growth management techniques. (Formerly ARC 5383. Credit cannot be earned for both URP 5383 and ARC 5383.) Differential Tuition: $165.

URP 5393. Urban Planning Methods II. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. Design and implementation of quantitative models in urban planning to answer relevant research questions. Emphasis on connecting method to question. Topics include descriptive statistics, difference of means testing, correlation, basic spatial statistics, regression analysis, and effectively communicating analytic results. (Formerly titled “Advanced Urban Planning Methods.”) Differential Tuition: $165.

URP 5413. Planning Practice and Ethics. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. This course explores how planners work, including legal foundations, ethical challenges, and practical issues. Students also have the opportunity to practice project management and organizational communication. Differential Tuition: $165.

URP 5423. Graphic Communication for Planners. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. This course is designed for graduate students in urban planning who are interested in graphic communications. The course goal is to obtain skills in graphic production that enable planners to communicate their ideas and plans to the public. Differential Tuition: $165.

URP 5433. Transportation Planning. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. This survey of transportation planning includes foundations, practical techniques, and disruptions, emphasizing emerging and sustainable transportation modes. Differential Tuition: $165.

URP 5443. Community Development. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. Introduction to contemporary trends in urban development and redevelopment, focusing on planning and development techniques used to develop or revitalize urban and regional areas. Differential Tuition: $165.

URP 5453. Urban and Regional Sustainability. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. Through this course, students will have the opportunity to acquire background knowledge necessary for developing plans and policies to promote sustainable urban and regional growth and preserve natural areas. This course will cover a wide range of state, regional, and local-level growth management techniques and land preservation policies. Differential Tuition: $165.

URP 5463. Environmental Planning and Assessment. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. This course will examine important parts of the legal basis of environmental planning and policy in the US. Then it will examine the causes and effects of air, water, and land pollution, and evaluate the planning and policy responses. In addition, it will survey and evaluate the application of planning tools and strategies to protect the natural environment, conserve natural resources, and mitigate climate change to create sustainable green communities. Differential Tuition: $165.

URP 5473. Introduction to Health Planning. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. This course provides a comprehensive introduction to fundamental concepts, principles, and methods of health planning aimed at the provision of health services, health-supportive facilities and the design of healthy communities. Differential Tuition: $165.

URP 5483. Planning Workshop. (2-2) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. A seminar/workshop involving an application of theory and practice relating to an urban or regional scale project. May be repeated for credit. Differential Tuition: $165.

URP 5493. Planning and Economic Development. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. An introduction to economic development as a critical element of neighborhood, community, regional, and national planning. The course addresses current economic development practices and theory. Differential Tuition: $165.

URP 5513. Public Participation and Qualitative Analysis. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. This course involves methods of facilitating public input and analyzing textual data. Topics include: Online and in-person involvement, integrating input to plans, co-production, and evaluation with case study, observational, and content analysis techniques. Differential Tuition: $165.

URP 6933. Planning Professional Report. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: URP 6943 and approval of the urban and regional planning Graduate Advisor of Record. The directed planning research course is offered only for nonthesis option students who have completed URP 6943 Professional Internship. May be repeated for credit, but not more than 6 hours may be applied to the Master’s degree. Differential Tuition: $165.

URP 6943. Professional Internship. (0-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing, 18 semester credit hours of graduate work, and consent of instructor. Supervised professional practice experience with public agencies or private firms. Individual conferences and written reports required. May be repeated for credit, but not more than 6 hours will apply to the Master of Science degree in Urban and Regional Planning. Differential Tuition: $165.

URP 6951. Independent Study. (0-0) 1 Credit Hour.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission in writing (form available) of the instructor and the Graduate Advisor of Record. Independent reading, research, discussion, and/or writing under the direction of a faculty member, for students needing specialized work not normally or not often available as part of the regular course offerings. May be repeated for credit, but not more than 6 hours, regardless of discipline, will apply to the Master of Science degree in Urban and Regional Planning. Differential Tuition: $55.

URP 6953. Independent Study. (0-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission in writing (form available) of the instructor and the Graduate Advisor of Record. Independent reading, research, discussion, and/or writing under the direction of a faculty member, for students needing specialized work not normally or not often available as part of the regular course offerings. May be repeated for credit, but not more than 6 hours, regardless of discipline, will apply to the Master of Science degree in Urban and Regional Planning. Differential Tuition: $165.

URP 6961. Comprehensive Examination. (0-0) 1 Credit Hour.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of the urban and regional planning Graduate Advisor of Record to take the comprehensive examination. Independent study course for the purpose of taking the Comprehensive Examination. The grade report for the course is either “CR” (satisfactory performance on the Comprehensive Examination) or “NC” (unsatisfactory performance on the Comprehensive Examination). Credit earned in URP 6961 may not be counted toward the Master of Science degree. May be repeated once. Differential Tuition: $55.

URP 6973. Special Topics. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. An organized course offering the opportunity for specialized study not normally or not often available as part of the regular course offerings. Special Topic courses may be repeated for credit when topics vary, but not more than 6 semester credit hours of URP 6973 or 12 hours of URP 6976 will apply to the Master of Science degree in Urban and Regional Planning. Differential Tuition: $165.

URP 6976. Special Topics. (6-0) 6 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. An organized course offering the opportunity for specialized study not normally or not often available as part of the regular course offerings. Special Topic courses may be repeated for credit when topics vary, but not more than 6 semester credit hours of URP 6973 or 12 hours of URP 6976 will apply to the Master of Science degree in Urban and Regional Planning. Differential Tuition: $330.

URP 6981. Master’s Thesis. (0-0) 1 Credit Hour.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of the urban and regional planning Graduate Advisor of Record. May be repeated for credit, but not more than 6 hours will apply to the Master of Science degree in Urban and Regional Planning. Credit will be awarded upon completion of the thesis. Enrollment is required each term in which the thesis is in progress. Differential Tuition: $55.

URP 6983. Master’s Thesis. (0-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of the urban and regional planning Graduate Advisor of Record. May be repeated for credit, but not more than 6 hours will apply to the Master of Science degree in Urban and Regional Planning. Credit will be awarded upon completion of the thesis. Enrollment is required each term in which the thesis is in progress. Differential Tuition: $165.