Legal Studies (LGS)

Legal Studies (LGS) Courses

LGS 2013. Introduction to Legal Studies. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. An introduction to legal studies from an interdisciplinary perspective, exploring historical and contemporary aspects of the content, operations, and effects of law in societies. Generally offered: Fall, Spring.

LGS 3013. Legal Research and Writing. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. Provides students with the opportunity to explore the modes and sources of legal research, both traditional and electronic. (Credit cannot be earned for both LGS 3013 and CRJ 3613. CRJ 3613 may be substituted for LGS 3013 in the LGS minor.) Generally offered: Fall, Spring, Summer.

LGS 3113. Minorities and the Law. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. This course examines the litigation, case law, legislation, and legal literature associated with African Americans and Mexican Americans in the United States. (Formerly titled “Blacks, Chicanos, and the Law.”) Generally offered: Fall.

LGS 3213. Law School Studies. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. Basic introduction to the primary subject areas covered in American law schools. Topics generally include Property, Civil Procedure, Contracts, Torts, Criminal Law, Family Law, Constitutional Law, and Professional Ethics. Topic coverage may extend to corporations, oil and gas, tax, or other more specialized topics. The course will better prepare students for the anticipated coursework and subject matter for the transition to law school. Generally offered: Summer.

LGS 3323. Constitutional Analysis I. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. An analysis of constitutional cases, issues, and modes of interpretation focusing on governmental powers. Provides students the opportunity to hone analytical, critical reading, and writing skills and to increase substantive knowledge of constitutional law. Generally offered: Summer.

LGS 3333. Constitutional Analysis II. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. An analysis of constitutional cases, issues, and modes of interpretation focusing on the Bill of Rights, individual freedoms, and equal protection. Provides students the opportunity to enhance analytical, critical-reading, and writing skills and to increase substantive knowledge of constitutional law. Generally offered: Summer.

LGS 3413. Regulatory Law and Enterprise. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. This course examines federal, state, and local administrative and regulatory engagement with Texan, American, and international enterprise. Students have the opportunity to explore law and policies affecting economic development, property, oil and gas, international trade, the Internet, and the environment.

LGS 3863. Contracts. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. An introduction to contract law, including topics such as offer and acceptance, consideration, contracts enforceable without consideration, defenses to enforcement of contracts, terms of contracts and their interpretation, performance and breach of contracts, remedies for breach, third-party beneficiaries, and assignments.

LGS 4013. Issues in Law and Society. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013 or LGS 2013. Provides students with the opportunity to conduct research on selected issues associated with the law and society. May be repeated for credit when topics vary, with permission of the Director of the Institute for Law and Public Affairs. Generally offered: Spring.

LGS 4033. Legal Analysis and Argumentation. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. Cultivates the practice of deliberative rhetoric with particular emphasis on its use in legal argumentation. Primary activity will be preparation for and participation in moot court, a simulation that involves arguing constitutional cases before the Supreme Court. Entails intensive study of case law. May be repeated for credit when the topic varies. (Formerly LGS 4133.).

LGS 4123. Legal and Philosophical Reasoning. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. An intensive analysis of selected philosophical texts focusing on law and justice. Students are challenged to develop critical reading and thinking skills by studying the texts of philosophers such as Plato, Aristotle, Dworkin, Hart, and/or others who outline difficult arguments and unfamiliar ideas. Emphasis is placed on drawing reasoned conclusions, advocating positions, and expressing oneself in oral and written forms. (Same as POL 4123. Credit cannot be earned for both LGS 4123 and POL 4123.).

LGS 4223. Torts. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. This course provides students with the opportunity to analyze American tort law. Topics may include negligence, intentional torts, affirmative defenses, and legal damages, as well as vicarious products and strict liability. Students should be prepared to read, brief, and discuss case law. Generally offered: Spring, Summer.

LGS 4233. Federal Courts. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: POL 1013. Designed to provide students with a sophisticated understanding of the role of the federal judiciary in the American constitutional system. Topics may include the constitutional framework and institutional development of the federal courts; their interaction with administrative agencies and state courts; and questions arising from the power of judicial review. (Formerly titled “The Federal Judiciary.”).

LGS 4913. Independent Study. (0-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: POL 1013; permission in writing (form available) from the instructor, the student’s advisor, the Department Chair, and the Dean of the College. Independent reading, research, discussion, and writing under direction of a faculty member. May be repeated for credit, but not more than 6 semester credit hours of independent study, regardless of discipline, will apply to a bachelor’s degree. A maximum of 3 semester credit hours may be applied to the minor.

LGS 4933. Internship in Legal Studies. (0-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: POL 1013; consent of internship coordinator. Supervised experience relevant to legal studies within selected community organizations. A maximum of 3 semester credit hours may be applied to the minor.