Department of English

The Department of English offers the following: Master of Arts Degree in English, Graduate Certificate in Creative Writing, Graduate Certificate in Rhetoric and Composition and Doctor of Philosophy Degree in English.

Master of Arts Degree in English

The Master of Arts degree in English offers the student an opportunity to acquire a general knowledge of literatures written primarily in English, to understand the historical and cultural contexts in which that literature was produced, to develop skills in critical analysis, and to conduct literary, rhetorical, and linguistic research.

Admission Requirements

In addition to satisfying the University-wide graduate admission requirements, the applicant must have completed at least 18 semester credit hours of work (exclusive of freshman courses) in English with a grade point average of 3.3 (on a 4.0 scale) in all work taken in English at the upper-division and graduate levels. This work must include at least 12 semester credit hours of upper-division English literature courses, and the student must have a grade point average of 3.3 in these courses. The applicant must submit scores from the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Test. These scores, considered in comparison with scores from applicants of similar socioeconomic background, will be used as one element in the evaluation of the applicant.

Degree Requirements

The minimum number of semester credit hours required for this degree, exclusive of coursework or other study required to remove admission deficiencies, is 36. Any grade lower than “B” in a graduate course will not count toward the 36 semester credit hours of coursework required in items A and B below.

Degree candidates must complete the following requirements:

A. 24 semester credit hours in the major, distributed as follows:24
1. Core Courses:
Introduction to the Graduate Study of Literature (normally must be taken in the student's first semester)
Topics in Literary Genres
2. Prescribed electives:
a. ENG literary study from before 1700, at least 3 semester credit hours must be ENG 5943 Topics in Major English Authors (minimum 6 semester credit hours)
b. ENG literary study between 1700 and 1900 (minimum 6 semester credit hours)
c. ENG literary study after 1900 (minimum 6 semester credit hours)
At least 6 hours of the above prescribed electives must include the study of literatures of the U.S., 3 of which must include the study of multiethnic literatures of the U.S. after 1900.
B. 12 semester credit hours of electives in graduate English:12
In consultation with the Graduate Advisor of Record, the student will select a program of elective courses in one of several specialized areas of study, such as the following:
Literature and/or Literary Theory
Linguistics and/or Rhetoric and Composition
Creative Writing
Post-colonial and Cultural Studies
Others as approved by the M.A. in English Graduate Program Committee
Total Credit Hours36

Students who have a grade point average of 3.3 or better, and with approval of the M.A. Graduate Advisor, may choose to include electives from outside of English.

Thesis option: Students who have completed 24 or more semester credit hours in an approved program of study with a grade point average of 3.5 or better, upon submission and approval of a thesis proposal to a Thesis Director and the Graduate Program Committee, may elect to include ENG 6983 or ENG 6986 Master’s Thesis in their 12 elective hours. Students choosing to write a creative thesis must have completed, among their approved electives, 6 hours of ENG 6043 Creative Writing or the equivalent; at least 3 of these 6 hours must be in the genre of the thesis.

As soon as a student completes 12 semester credit hours of graduate coursework in English, he or she must meet with the Graduate Advisor to draw up a program of study.

In addition to the semester-credit-hour requirements set forth above, candidates for the degree are required to pass the Comprehensive Examination. The Comprehensive Examination, composed of both written and oral portions, is offered two times a year, each Fall and Spring semester, and may be offered during the Summer term under extraordinary circumstances. Under normal circumstances, the Comprehensive Examination may be taken only twice.

Doctor of Philosophy Degree in English

The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree in English offers students opportunities for advanced study and research in cross-cultural, transnational approaches to English language and literary studies, with coursework required in U.S. Latina/o literature and the theory and practice of teaching composition. The Ph.D. in English is awarded to candidates who complete all required coursework, demonstrate in-depth, cross-cultural knowledge of literature, language or composition and rhetoric, and produce an original contribution to their field of specialization.

The regulations for this degree comply with the general University requirements (refer to General Academic Regulations, and Doctoral Degree Regulations).

Admission Requirements

In addition to satisfying the University-wide graduate admission requirements, the minimum requirements for admission to the Doctoral program in English are as follows:

  1. The student must have a Master’s degree in English or a related discipline with a grade point average of 3.5 or better.
  2. A minimum of at least 18 upper-division and/or graduate hours in English literary studies with a grade point average of 3.5 or better.

In addition, applicants must submit:

  1. A statement of purpose (2–3 pages).
  2. A writing sample (a research paper of approximately 15 pages).
  3. Three letters of recommendation attesting to the student’s academic training, capability, and potential.
  4. Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Test scores no older than five years. These scores will be considered in comparison with scores from applicants of similar socioeconomic background.
  5. Students who have received degrees from non-English speaking universities must submit Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) scores of no less than 550 (paper version), or 79 (Internet version).

Degree Requirements

The minimum number of semester credit hours required for this degree, exclusive of coursework or other study required to remove admission deficiencies, is 39 graduate hours beyond the Master’s degree.

Students who are accepted into the Doctoral program without a Master’s degree must complete all requirements for the Master of Arts degree in English or its equivalent. Courses in which students receive any grade lower than “B” will not count toward the 39 semester credit hours of coursework required in items A through D.

Degree candidates for the Doctoral degree that have obtained a Master's degree must complete the following requirements:

A. Core Curriculum:9
Theory and Practice of Teaching Composition (if a course equivalent has already been taken)
Rhetoric and Composition: Text and Context
Theoretical and Research Methods
Latina/o Studies: Text and Context
B. Seminars:9
Seminar: Latina/o Studies
Seminar: Issues in Culture
Seminar: Theory and Criticism
C. Electives:15
1. Select one of the following prescribed electives:
Rhetoric and Composition: Text and Context (if not taken to fulfill core requirement)
Language and Linguistics
Cross Cultural Issues: Text and Context
2. Free electives (minimum 12 semester credit hours, including at least 6 in ENG graduate courses). The student, in consultation with an academic advisor and the Doctoral Advisor of Record, will select at least 12 hours of freely elected courses. Students will select coursework from available graduate courses in ENG or, with approval of the Graduate Program Committee, related disciplines.
D. Doctoral research:6
Doctoral Dissertation
Total Credit Hours39

The entire program of study must be approved by the student’s dissertation advisor, dissertation committee, and Graduate Program Committee, and must be submitted to the Dean of the Graduate School, through the Dean of the College, for final approval.

Degree candidates for the Doctoral degree that have obtained a Bachelor's degree must complete the following requirements:

A. 24 semester credit hours in the major, distributed as follows:24
1. Core Courses:
Introduction to the Graduate Study of Literature (normally must be taken in the student's first semester)
Topics in Literary Genres
2. Prescribed electives:
a. ENG literary study from before 1700, at least 3 semester credit hours must be ENG 5943 Topics in Major English Authors (minimum 6 semester credit hours)
b. ENG literary study between 1700 and 1900 (minimum 6 semester credit hours)
c. ENG literary study after 1900 (minimum 6 semester credit hours)
At least 6 hours of the above prescribed electives must include the study of literatures of the U.S., 3 of which must include the study of multiethnic literatures of the U.S. after 1900.
B. 12 semester credit hours of electives in graduate English:12
In consultation with the Graduate Advisor of Record, the student will select a program of elective courses in one of several specialized areas of study, such as the following:
Literature and/or Literary Theory
Linguistics and/or Rhetoric and Composition
Creative Writing
Post-colonial and Cultural Studies
Others as approved by the M.A. in English Graduate Program Committee
C. Core Curriculum:9
Theory and Practice of Teaching Composition
Rhetoric and Composition: Text and Context
Theoretical and Research Methods
Latina/o Studies: Text and Context
D. Seminars: 9
Seminar: Latina/o Studies
Seminar: Issues in Culture
Seminar: Theory and Criticism
E. Electives:15
1. Select one of the following prescribed electives:
Rhetoric and Composition: Text and Context ((If not taken to fulfill core requirement.))
Language and Linguistics
Cross Cultural Issues: Text and Context
2. Free Electives (minimum 12 semester credit hours, including at least 6 in ENG graduate courses). The student, in consultation with an academic advisor and the Doctoral Advisor of Record, will select at least 12 hours of freely elected courses. Students will select coursework from available graduate courses in ENG or, with approval of the Graduate Program Committee, related disciplines.
F. Doctoral research:6
Doctoral Dissertation
Total Credit Hours75

The entire program of study must be approved by the student’s dissertation advisor, dissertation committee, and Graduate Program Committee, and must be submitted to the Dean of the Graduate School, through the Dean of the College, for final approval.

Language Requirement

In addition to fluency in English, students must demonstrate proficiency in Spanish or another language that is approved in advance by the Graduate Program Committee. Proficiency may be demonstrated in one of the following ways:

  1. Successful completion of an upper-division undergraduate course or a graduate course with a grade of “B” or better. The course must be approved in advance by the Graduate Program Committee.
  2. Passing the College Level Examination Program (CLEP) examination in the approved language with a score of 85% or higher.

Admission to Candidacy

A student will be admitted to candidacy after completing all University and program requirements, passing the Qualifying Examination, and completing a dissertation prospectus. The Qualifying Examination will be based on three areas of literary study, one of which must be cross-cultural in focus; all three must be relevant to the student’s anticipated dissertation and selected in consultation with the student’s examination committee. In consultation with the examination committee, the student will prepare reading lists in each area and compose position papers in each of the three areas. The examination committee must approve the reading lists and conduct an oral examination on the reading lists and the position papers. The Qualifying Examination will be completed when the examination committee approves the student’s written and oral examination. After completion of the Qualifying Examination and submission of the dissertation prospectus (approximately 15–20 pages), the student will submit a portfolio (as described in the Graduate Student Handbook). The student’s Dissertation Committee approves the student’s dissertation prospectus and the portfolio and recommends admission to candidacy to the Dean of the Graduate School through the Graduate Program Committee and the Dean of the College.

Dissertation and Final Oral Examination (Defense of the Dissertation)

Candidates must demonstrate their ability to conduct independent research by completing and defending an original dissertation that makes a significant contribution to the fields of English literature, language, or rhetoric and composition. The student, in consultation with his or her dissertation advisor, determines the research topic. A dissertation committee, selected by the student and dissertation advisor and approved by the Dean of the College and the Dean of the Graduate School, will guide and critique the candidate’s research. The dissertation committee must unanimously approve the completed dissertation. The dissertation shall then be defended publicly before the dissertation committee.

Graduate Certificate in Creative Writing

The Graduate Certificate in Creative Writing is a 12-semester-credit-hour concentration available to degree-seeking students who have been admitted to any UTSA graduate program. Students who already have a graduate degree may also be considered for admission to the Creative Writing certificate program as special graduate students.

The Graduate Certificate in Creative Writing adds interdisciplinary breadth to a student’s course of study while increasing the depth and coherence of a student’s work in creative writing. Given the growing interest in creative writing in nontraditional disciplines of medicine, sociology, and psychology as well as in liberal arts, many students find this formal recognition of their work in Creative Writing to be a valuable credential in both academic and nonacademic job markets. This certificate demands an active engagement in graduate-level creative writing classes. Students who are pursuing the Graduate Certificate also receive first consideration for graduate workshop registration.

Certificate Requirements

Requirements for the Graduate Certificate include 12 semester credit hours, No course in which a grade lower than “B” is earned may be used to complete a Graduate Certificate in Creative Writing.

Required Courses (12 semester credit hours): 12
Creative Writing
May be repeated in any combination, but at least 3 hours must be taken in each genre (poetry and fiction)
Total Credit Hours12

Individuals interested in the Graduate Certificate in Creative Writing should contact the Graduate Office of the Department of English.

Graduate Certificate in Rhetoric and Composition

The Graduate Certificate in Rhetoric and Composition is a 12-semester-credit-hour concentration available to degree-seeking students who have been admitted to any UTSA graduate program, as well as special graduate students who meet all the requirements outlined in the UTSA Graduate Catalog.

The Graduate Certificate in Rhetoric and Composition offers coursework in advanced, interdisciplinary study of language and language instruction, encompassing theoretical, applied, and pedagogical aspects of discourse. This certificate is designed for graduate students interested in working at the master’s or doctoral level in rhetoric and composition and will be particularly valuable for doctoral students focusing on one of the two areas of emphasis in the Ph.D. in English program, Rhetoric and Composition. This certificate will also enhance students’ employment credentials as college and university writing instructors or professional writers in corporate, nonprofit, and educational settings. This certificate offers further professional development at the graduate level for teachers already teaching English Language Arts at the high school level.

Certificate Requirements

Requirements for the Graduate Certificate in Rhetoric and Composition comprise 12 semester credit hours, including:

A. Required Course (3 semester credit hours):3
Development of Rhetoric and Composition
B. Electives (9 semester credit hours):9
Select 3 of the following courses:
Theory and Practice of Teaching Composition
Rhetoric and Composition: Text and Context
Language and Linguistics
Supervised Teaching in English
Total Credit Hours12

Courses may be repeated when topics vary but not more than 6 hours of any one course may be applied to the certificate. No course in which a grade lower than “B” is earned may be used to complete a Graduate Certificate in Rhetoric and Composition. In order to receive this certificate, students must maintain a 3.0 or better grade point average in the above courses.

Individuals interested in the Graduate Certificate in Rhetoric and Composition should contact the Graduate Office of the Department of English.

English (ENG) Courses

ENG 5013. Introduction to the Graduate Study of Literature. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Introduction to the premises, concepts, and methods of literary study, including literary history, terminology, bibliography, and various critical and theoretical approaches to literature. Normally must be taken in the student’s first semester of graduate study.

ENG 5053. Topics in Literary Genres. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Consideration of texts selected to illustrate the structural, conceptual, and contextual properties of a specific genre, e.g., poetry, fiction, drama, or film. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

ENG 5133. Development of Rhetoric and Composition. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Survey of the development of rhetorical theory, with emphasis on how present composition theory and practice reflect earlier traditions.

ENG 5173. Theory and Practice of Teaching Literature. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Critical study of literary pedagogy and applications of theory and research to the teaching of literature.

ENG 5183. Theory and Practice of Teaching Composition. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Introduction to current scholarship in composition and applications to the teaching of writing.

ENG 5223. Medieval Literature. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Critical study of works from the Anglo-Saxon period through the fifteenth century, excluding Chaucer. Some readings are in modern translation, and some are in Middle English.

ENG 5313. Renaissance Literature. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Critical study of poetry, prose, and drama of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, excluding Shakespeare and Milton.

ENG 5413. Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Critical study of poetry, prose, and drama of the Restoration and the eighteenth century.

ENG 5513. Nineteenth-Century British Literature. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Critical study of poetry and prose of nineteenth-century British writers.

ENG 5613. Nineteenth-Century American Literature. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Critical study of poetry and prose of nineteenth-century American writers.

ENG 5633. Topics in the Study of Literature. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Exploration of the ways that important texts, theories, and cultural or intellectual movements have shaped the study of literature and literary forms. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

ENG 5733. British and American Literature, 1900–1950. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Critical study of poetry, prose, and drama of British and American writers from 1900 to 1950.

ENG 5743. British and American Literature, 1950–The Present. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Critical study of poetry, prose, and drama of British and American writers from 1950 to the present.

ENG 5753. World Literatures in English. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Critical study of poetry, prose, and drama of world literatures in English, such as literature of the Indian subcontinent, Latin America, Africa, or the Caribbean.

ENG 5763. Latina/o Literature. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Critical study of poetry, prose, and drama of Latina/o writers.

ENG 5773. Women and Literature. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Critical study of poetry, prose, and drama written by women and/or representing female identity.

ENG 5783. African American Literature. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Critical study of poetry, prose, and drama of African American writers.

ENG 5933. Topics in American Literature. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Critical study of selected American authors, themes, or cultural, historical, or aesthetic issues. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

ENG 5943. Topics in Major English Authors. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Critical study of the major works of one of the following authors: Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

ENG 6013. Theoretical and Research Methods. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Introduction to the theories and methods of professional literary research, including research in cross-cultural studies. (Formerly titled "Bibliography and Research").

ENG 6023. Rhetoric and Composition: Text and Context. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Advanced study and research of topics and movements in rhetoric and composition. May be repeated for credit when topics vary, but not more than 6 hours may be applied to the Master’s or Doctoral degrees in English without the approval of the Graduate Program Committee.

ENG 6033. Language and Linguistics. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Advanced study and research of topics and movements in language and/or linguistics. May be repeated for credit when topics vary, but not more than 6 hours may be applied to the Master’s or Doctoral degrees in English without the approval of the Graduate Program Committee.

ENG 6043. Creative Writing. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: Approval of instructor and Graduate Advisor of Record. Intensive workshop in creative writing. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

ENG 6053. Latina/o Studies: Text and Context. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Advanced study and research of Latina/o texts. May include some literature in translation. May be repeated once for credit when topics vary.

ENG 6063. Cross Cultural Issues: Text and Context. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Advanced study and research of primary literary texts in the context of key cultural and/or cross-cultural issues. May be repeated once for credit when topics vary.

ENG 6073. Theory and Criticism: Text and Context. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Advanced study and research of topics and movements in literary theory and criticism. May be repeated once for credit when topics vary.

ENG 6951. Independent Study. (0-0) 1 Credit Hour.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission in writing (form available) of the instructor and the Graduate Advisor of Record. Independent reading, research, discussion, and/or writing under the direction of a faculty member. For students needing specialized work not normally or not often available as part of the regular course offerings. May be repeated for credit, but not more than 6 hours, regardless of discipline, will apply to the Master of Arts degree in English.

ENG 6953. Independent Study. (0-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission in writing (form available) of the instructor and the Graduate Advisor of Record. Independent reading, research, discussion, and/or writing under the direction of a faculty member. For students needing specialized work not normally or not often available as part of the regular course offerings. May be repeated for credit, but not more than 6 hours, regardless of discipline, will apply to the Master of Arts degree in English.

ENG 6961. Comprehensive Examination. (0-0) 1 Credit Hour.

Prerequisite: Approval of the Graduate Advisor of Record. Independent study course for the purpose of taking the Comprehensive Examination. May be repeated once. Enrollment is required each term in which the Comprehensive Examination is taken if no other courses are being taken that term. The grade report for the course is either “CR” (satisfactory performance on the Comprehensive Examination) or “NC” (unsatisfactory performance on the Comprehensive Examination). Credit earned in ENG 6961 cannot be counted in the 36 hours required for the Master’s degree or for the 39 hours required for the Doctoral degree in English.

ENG 6973. Special Topics. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

An organized course offering the opportunity for specialized study not normally or not often available as part of the regular course offerings. May be repeated for credit when topics vary, but not more than 6 hours, regardless of discipline, will apply to the Master’s or Doctoral degrees in English.

ENG 6983. Master’s Thesis. (0-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: Permission of the thesis advisor and the Graduate Advisor of Record. Supervised thesis research and preparation. May be repeated for credit, but not more than 6 hours will apply to the Master’s degree. Credit will be awarded upon completion of the thesis. Enrollment is required each term in which the thesis is in progress.

ENG 6986. Master’s Thesis. (0-0) 6 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: Permission of the thesis advisor and the Graduate Advisor of Record. Supervised thesis research and preparation. May be repeated for credit, but not more than 6 hours will apply to the Master’s degree. Credit will be awarded upon completion of the thesis. Enrollment is required each term in which the thesis is in progress.

ENG 7053. Seminar: Latina/o Studies. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: ENG 6013. Advanced and intensive research on key issues in Latina/o Studies. May be repeated once for credit when topics vary.

ENG 7063. Seminar: Issues in Culture. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: ENG 6013. Advanced and intensive research on key issues in cultural and/or cross-cultural studies. May be repeated once for credit when topics vary.

ENG 7073. Seminar: Theory and Criticism. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: ENG 6013. Advanced and intensive research on key issues in theory and criticism. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

ENG 7083. Seminar: New Texts/New Contexts. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: ENG 6013. Advanced and intensive research on recent writings or movements influencing literary and cultural studies. May be repeated once for credit when topics vary.

ENG 7113. Supervised Teaching in English. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: Admission to the Doctoral program in English and approval of the Graduate Advisor of Record. Development and implementation of an undergraduate course in English under the supervision of a member of the English graduate faculty. May be repeated for credit.

ENG 7211. Directed Readings. (0-0) 1 Credit Hour.

Prerequisites: ENG 6013 and completion of at least 12 additional hours of 6000-level and/or 7000-level ENG coursework, and permission of the Graduate Program Committee. Reading, research, discussion, and writing under the direction of a member of the graduate faculty. Enables students to prepare one of their fields of specialization when other appropriate classes are unavailable. May be repeated for credit, but not more than 12 hours may be applied to the Doctoral degree.

ENG 7213. Directed Readings. (0-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: ENG 6013 and completion of at least 12 additional hours of 6000-level and/or 7000-level ENG coursework, and permission of the Graduate Program Committee. Reading, research, discussion, and writing under the direction of a member of the graduate faculty. Enables students to prepare one of their fields of specialization when other appropriate classes are unavailable. May be repeated for credit, but not more than 12 hours may be applied to the Doctoral degree.

ENG 7311. Doctoral Dissertation. (0-0) 1 Credit Hour.

Prerequisites: Admission to candidacy for the Doctoral degree, completion of 33 hours of coursework approved by the Graduate Advisor and the Graduate Program Committee, and fulfillment of the Language Requirement. May be repeated for credit but not more than 18 hours may be applied to the Doctoral degree.

ENG 7313. Doctoral Dissertation. (0-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: Admission to candidacy for the Doctoral degree, completion of 33 hours of coursework approved by the Graduate Advisor and the Graduate Program Committee, and fulfillment of the Language Requirement. May be repeated for credit but not more than 18 hours may be applied to the Doctoral degree.

ENG 7961. Qualifying Examination. (0-0) 1 Credit Hour.

Prerequisite: Approval of the Graduate Program Committee to take the Qualifying Examination. Independent study course for the purpose of taking the Qualifying Examination. May be repeated for credit as many times as approved by the Graduate Program Committee. Enrollment is required each term in which the Qualifying Examination is taken if no other courses are being taken that term. The grade report for the course is either “CR” (satisfactory performance on the Qualifying Examination) or “NC” (unsatisfactory performance on the Qualifying Examination).