Department of Anthropology

The Department of Anthropology offers the  Master of Arts Degree in Anthropology and the Doctor of Philosophy Degree in Anthropology.

Master of Arts Degree in Anthropology

The Master of Arts program in Anthropology supports the holistic ideal of Americanist anthropology and is dedicated to training graduate students in both method and theory. Students, in conjunction with faculty, may design their programs with a focus on the subdisciplines of archaeology or cultural anthropology. Faculty expertise includes the archaeology of the Maya and Andean regions; the archaeology of Texas, the American Southwest, and northern Mexico; the cultural anthropology of Texas and the Plains; ethnography and applied anthropology of Mexico and the United States; medical anthropology of the Border region; conservation ecology in the Americas, Africa, and Island Pacific; and indigenous and environmental politics in Africa, Island Pacific, and lowland and Andean South America.

Application Procedures

The Anthropology Department admits Master’s students once a year in the Fall. The departmental deadline for applications is March 1.

In addition to satisfying the University-wide graduate admission requirements, applicants should have a 3.3 grade point average in the last 60 hours of coursework and have successfully taken 12–18 hours of coursework in anthropology. This coursework should include courses across the subdisciplines of anthropology.

Applicants for admission to the M.A. program in Anthropology must complete an online application for admission through the UTSA Graduate School (http://graduateschool.utsa.edu/). For all applicants, including graduate degree-seeking, non-degree-seeking, and special graduate students (see Chapter 1, Admission, of this catalog for definitions), the application to the Master of Arts program in Anthropology consists of an application form, official academic transcripts, an essay (statement of purpose), writing sample, and three letters of recommendation. For graduate degree-seeking applicants, Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores must also be submitted to the Graduate School.

Essay: Please write a statement telling us about your intentions for entering UTSA’s M.A. program in Anthropology. This letter should be approximately 500–750 words in length (approximately two to three double-spaced pages). This statement should include information on:

  • undergraduate coursework and other relevant experiences (how did these prepare you for graduate work in Anthropology),

  • area of subdisciplinary and regional specialization, as well as particular research interests,

  • how your academic interests match with faculty, departmental and university resources,

  • at least two faculty who would be suitable advisors; and

  • how a graduate degree in Anthropology will further your career goals.

Writing Sample: It is preferred that the writing sample be a 10–25 page term or research paper.

Letters of Recommendation: At least two of the three required recommendation letters will preferably be from faculty who have worked closely with the applicant in either the classroom, laboratory, or other research site.

GRE: For graduate degree-seeking applicants, GRE scores must also be submitted to the Graduate School. These scores will be considered as only one element in the evaluation of applicants.

Other Test Scores: Applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). The English Language Assessment Procedure is a mandatory assessment for incoming international students whose TOEFL scores are between 550 and 600 (paper version) or 79 and 100 (Internet version). See Chapter 1, Admission, of this catalog for details.

Applications will not be reviewed until complete.

Applicants can request graduate degree-seeking, non-degree-­seeking, or special graduate student status. A graduate degree-seeking applicant admitted to the program may receive unconditional, conditional, or probationary admission status. Non-degree-seeking students and special graduate students may be limited in the courses they are permitted to take. Admission with non-degree-seeking or special graduate student status does not ensure subsequent admission as a degree-seeking student.

Applicants will be evaluated on the basis of demonstrated potential for success in graduate study in Anthropology as indicated by a combination of prior undergraduate academic performance, the application essay, research interests, writing sample, letters of recommendation, and, if applicable, GRE test scores. Admission is competitive. Satisfying minimum requirements does not guarantee admission.

Degree Requirements

The minimum number of semester credit hours required for this degree is 33 (with thesis). In addition to the University’s general requirements for graduate study and any coursework or other study required as a condition of admission, the Master of Arts degree in Anthropology requires the following:

A. 9 semester credit hours of required basic courses:9
History, Method, and Theory of Archaeology
Theory in Cultural Anthropology
Advanced Biological Anthropology
B. 3 semester credit hours of a dedicated methods class, as approved by the student's advisor.3
C. 15 semester credit hours of elective courses chosen in consultation with the student’s advisor and subject to the following conditions:15
1. Students will normally take a minimum of 9 semester credit hours of electives in regular, organized graduate anthropology courses (this excludes ANT 6443 Supervised Field Research, ANT 6933 Internship in Anthropology, and ANT 6953 Independent Study).
2. Students are expected to develop a primary regional or topical expertise. Knowledge of this region or topic will be evaluated as part of the comprehensive examination (see below).
D. Although there is no program-wide language proficiency requirement, certain programs of study require students to demonstrate proficiency in a second language or in statistics. Students should consult their advisors regarding this matter.
E. A written comprehensive examination, tailored to the student’s program and area of concentration, is required. The comprehensive examination will be taken no later than nine months after the completion of the required coursework. Satisfactory performance on the comprehensive examination is required for advancement to thesis research and writing.
F. 6 semester credit hours of ANT 6983 Master’s Thesis.6
Total Credit Hours33

Doctor of Philosophy Degree in Anthropology

UTSA’s Ph.D. program in Anthropology offers training in anthropology’s traditional subdisciplines to further basic and applied research into ecological and environmental concerns. Students will develop empirical understandings of how humans culturally construct and organize past and present environments; how power relations are embedded in these activities; and the impact social and physical environments have upon human and nonhuman primates. Theoretical and applied emphases include political and cultural ecology; landscape perspectives; agrarian economy and ecology; the archaeology of complexity; indigenous and environmental politics; primate and evolutionary ecology; medical anthropology; perspectives on sociocultural change; myth, ritual and language; and conservation, biology and practice. Geographic research areas include: American Southwest, Texas, Northwest Mexico, Andean South America, Mesoamerica and Maya Lowlands (archaeology); Southeast Asia, Africa, and Neotropics (biological anthropology); and United States, Mexico, U.S.-Mexico borderlands, Lowland South America, Africa, and Island Pacific (cultural anthropology).

The regulations for this degree comply with the general University regulations (refer to Chapter 2, General Academic Regulations, and Chapter 5, Doctoral Degree Regulations).

Application Procedures

Applicants for admission to the Ph.D. program in Anthropology must satisfy all University-wide graduate admission requirements. Applicants must submit a complete Graduate School Application. Complete applications include the application form, summary sheet, official academic transcripts, an essay (750–900 word statement of purpose), a writing sample, and three letters of recommendation. Applicants must also submit Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores with their application. These scores will be considered as only one element in the evaluation of applicants. Only completed applications will be reviewed.

Applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). The English Language Assessment Procedure is a mandatory assessment for incoming international students whose TOEFL scores are between 550 and 600 (paper version) or 79 and 100 (Internet version). See Chapter 1, Admission, of this catalog for details.

Applicants to the Ph.D. program must request degree-seeking status. Applicants admitted to the Ph.D. program may receive unconditional, conditional, or probationary admission status.

Admission is competitive. Satisfying the minimum requirements does not guarantee admission. In any given application cycle, Ph.D. applicants will be evaluated on the strength of their application materials and also against other applicants in the same pool.

Degree Requirements

All students are expected to master skill sets in research, analysis, academic writing, and pedagogy.  They are required to take a minimum of 78 semester credit hours beyond the baccalaureate degree (exclusive of organized coursework required to remove conditions of admission).  In addition, students must successfully pass a qualifying examination, a doctoral dissertation proposal defense, and a doctoral dissertation defense.

Program of Study for Students Admitted Without a Master’s Degree

All students who are accepted into the Doctoral program without a Master’s degree (or its coursework equivalent) must successfully complete the program of study below. Students transferring to the Doctoral program from accredited graduate programs but lacking a Master’s degree may receive approval to transfer some coursework to UTSA, pending review by the Graduate Program Committee. Each student’s transcript will be evaluated by the Graduate Program Committee, and credit will be determined on a course-by-course basis to satisfy the requirements of the degree. For credit to be accepted from an outside institution, a student must have earned course grades of “B” (“B-” is not acceptable) or better.

A. 12 semester credit hours of Doctoral Core courses:12
History, Method, and Theory of Archaeology
Theory in Cultural Anthropology
Advanced Biological Anthropology
Ecological Anthropology
B. 6 semester credit hours of methods courses, as approved by the student's advisor.6
C. 33 semester credit hours of elective courses, as approved by the student's advisor. If students wish to take elective courses outside the Department, they first must seek approval from the Graduate Program Committee.33
D. 3 semester credit hours of ANT 7003 Dissertation Proposal (after successful completion of the qualifying examination and nearing the completion of organized coursework)3
E. Doctoral Research and Dissertation (minimum 24 semester credit hours ):24
Directed Doctoral Research
Directed Doctoral Research
Directed Doctoral Research
Doctoral Dissertation
Doctoral Dissertation
Doctoral Dissertation
Total Credit Hours78
Qualifying Examination

Students may take the qualifying examination upon successful completion of 30 hours of coursework; this coursework must include all required Doctoral Core courses. At least two months prior to taking the qualifying examination, the student and the Supervising Professor will select an Advisory Committee, which needs to be approved by the Ph.D. Graduate Advisor of Record, and schedule dates for the qualifying examination. The examination consists of three written literature reviews in areas most relevant to the student’s research and will cover issues of geographical/topical, methodological, and theoretical relevance. It is intended that the qualifying examination will lay the groundwork for subsequent dissertation research.

Earning a Master’s Degree

Students who pass their qualifying examinations will be awarded the M.A. degree, and will be given permission to work toward completion of doctoral requirements. Students who fail their qualifying examinations may be given one of two options by their Advisory Committees. Those options are: permission to retake all or portions of the examination; or, permission to pursue a terminal M.A. degree according to the requirements of that degree program.

Proficiency in Foreign Language, Statistics, or Computer Programming

Doctoral students are required to have proficiency in a foreign language, statistics, or computer programming as deemed necessary by the Graduate Program Committee. This requirement must be fulfilled prior to the oral defense of the dissertation proposal. Should coursework be necessary, students may apply their credit hours to the free electives requirement of the Doctoral degree.

Doctoral Dissertation Proposal

Doctoral students are required to produce a dissertation proposal that will be submitted to their Advisory Committee for review. This will occur following successful completion of the qualifying examination, and as students near completion of required coursework (51 semester credit hours). Students will enroll in 3 credit hours of ANT 7003 Dissertation Proposal, in order to conduct preliminary research and write a successful proposal. Students must orally defend the proposal in order to qualify for doctoral degree candidacy.

Dissertation Committee

Following successful defense of the dissertation proposal, the student and the Supervising Professor will select a Dissertation Committee, which needs to be approved by the Dean of the College and the Dean of the Graduate School (see Chapter 5, Doctoral Degree Regulations, for further information on requirements of committee composition).

Advancement to Candidacy

Doctoral students can apply for admission to candidacy once they have met all requirements for the Doctoral degree other than dissertation research and write-up. The requirements include successfully completing all coursework, passing the qualifying examination, passing a foreign language examination or demonstrating statistical or computer competency, as applicable, submitting and successfully defending the dissertation proposal, and forming a Dissertation Committee approved by the University.

Dissertation

Candidates must demonstrate their ability to conduct independent research by completing and defending an original dissertation that makes a significant contribution to the field. The student, in consultation with his or her Supervising Professor, determines the research topic. The student’s Dissertation Committee will guide and critique the candidate’s research. The Dissertation Committee must unanimously approve the completed dissertation. The dissertation shall then be defended publicly before the Dissertation Committee. Students should be continually registered in Directed Doctoral Research (ANT 7011-ANT 7013) and Doctoral Dissertation (ANT 7021-ANT 7023) each semester the dissertation is in progress.

Final Oral Examination

Students must orally defend their dissertation as the final degree requirement. The Supervising Professor must notify the Graduate School in writing at least two weeks prior to the final scheduled oral defense. Awarding of the degree is based on the approval of the Dissertation Committee and the acceptance of the Graduate School. The Dean of the Graduate School certifies the completion of all University-wide requirements (see Chapter 5, Doctoral Degree Regulations, for further information).

Program of Study for Students Admitted With a Master’s Degree

Students who are admitted into the Doctoral program with acceptable Master’s degrees from accredited institutions may receive approval to transfer up to 30 hours of their Master’s-level coursework. Outside coursework must be approved by the Anthropology Graduate Program Committee. Each student’s transcript will be evaluated by the Graduate Program Committee, and credit will be determined on a course-by-course basis to satisfy the requirements of the degree. The Committee has the option of requiring or recommending additional courses if it is deemed that the student has not obtained a background equivalent to training at UTSA. For credit to be accepted from an outside institution, a student must have earned course grades of “B” (“B-” is not acceptable) or better.

To complete their Ph.D. program of study, students entering the program with an acceptable Master’s degree and 30 hours of transfer credit must complete the following minimum requirements:

A. 3 semester credit hours of ANT 6603 Ecological Anthropology3
B. A minimum of 18 semester credit hours of additional coursework, as approved by the student's advisor and chosen from the following domains:18
1. Doctoral Core courses (students may be exempted from some core courses, with the approval of the Graduate Program Committee, if they have taken equivalent coursework at their M.A.-conferring institutions).
2. Methods courses, as indicated by the student's areas of interest and approved by the student's advisor.
3. Elective Courses (if students wish to take elective courses outside the Department, they first must seek approval from the Graduate Program Committee).
C. 3 semester credit hours of ANT 7003 Dissertation Proposal (after successful completion of the qualifying examination and nearing the completion of organized coursework)3
D. Doctoral Research and Dissertation (minimum 24 semester credit hours):24
Directed Doctoral Research
Directed Doctoral Research
Directed Doctoral Research
Doctoral Dissertation
Doctoral Dissertation
Doctoral Dissertation
Total Credit Hours48
Qualifying Examination

Students may take the qualifying examination upon successful completion of 30 hours of coursework; this coursework must include required Doctoral Core courses. At least two months prior to taking the qualifying examination, the student and the Supervising Professor will select an Advisory Committee, which needs to be approved by the Ph.D. Graduate Advisor of Record, and schedule dates for the qualifying examination. The examination consists of three written literature reviews in areas most relevant to the student’s research and will cover issues of geographical/topical, methodological, and theoretical relevance. It is intended that the qualifying examination will help lay the groundwork for subsequent dissertation research.

Proficiency in Foreign Language, Statistics, or Computer Programming

Doctoral students are required to have proficiency in a foreign language, statistics, or computer programming as deemed necessary by the Graduate Program Committee. This requirement must be fulfilled prior to the oral defense of the dissertation proposal. Should coursework be necessary, students may apply their credit hours to the free electives requirement of the Doctoral degree.

Doctoral Dissertation Proposal

Students are required to produce a dissertation proposal that will be submitted to their Advisory Committee for review. This will occur following successful completion of the qualifying examination, and as students near completion of required coursework (51 semester credit hours). Students will enroll in 3 credit hours of ANT 7003 Dissertation Proposal, in order to conduct preliminary research and write a successful proposal. Students must orally defend the proposal in order to qualify for doctoral degree candidacy.

Dissertation Committee

Following successful defense of the dissertation proposal, the student and the Supervising Professor will select a Dissertation Committee, which needs to be approved by the Dean of the College and the Dean of the Graduate School (see Chapter 5, Doctoral Degree Regulations, for further information on requirements of committee composition).

Advancement to Candidacy

Doctoral students can apply for admission to candidacy once they have met all requirements for the Doctoral degree other than dissertation research and write-up. The requirements include successfully completing all coursework, passing the qualifying examination, passing a foreign language examination or demonstrating statistical or computer competency, as applicable, submitting and successfully defending the dissertation proposal, and forming a Dissertation Committee approved by the University.

Dissertation

Candidates must demonstrate their ability to conduct independent research by completing and defending an original dissertation that makes a significant contribution to the field. The student, in consultation with his or her Supervising Professor, determines the research topic. The student’s Dissertation Committee will guide and critique the candidate’s research. The Dissertation Committee must unanimously approve the completed dissertation. The dissertation shall then be defended publicly before the Dissertation Committee. Students should be continually registered in Directed Doctoral Research (ANT 7011-ANT 7013) and Doctoral Dissertation (ANT 7021-ANT 7023) each semester the dissertation is in progress.

Final Oral Examination

Students must orally defend their dissertation as the final degree requirement. The Supervising Professor must notify the Graduate School in writing at least two weeks prior to the final scheduled oral defense. Awarding of the degree is based on the approval of the Dissertation Committee and the acceptance of the Graduate School. The Dean of the Graduate School certifies the completion of all University-wide requirements (see Chapter 5, Doctoral Degree Regulations, for further information).

Anthropology (ANT) Courses

ANT 5023. History, Method, and Theory of Archaeology. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

A survey of the history and development of archaeology, research techniques, and method and theory of prehistoric research. May be repeated for credit with different instructors.

ANT 5033. Theory in Cultural Anthropology. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

This course surveys the main conceptual, methodological, and theoretical developments in cultural anthropology. (Formerly titled “Paradigms of Americanist Anthropology.”).

ANT 5043. Seminar in Laboratory Methods in Anthropology. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

This seminar reviews the physical and technical aspects of analysis of anthropological materials. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

ANT 5073. Advanced Biological Anthropology. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

An intensive review of the history of biological anthropology and current developments in method and theory. Topics will be drawn from the four major areas of biological anthropology: genetics and evolutionary theory, human variation and adaptation, primatology, and paleoanthropology.

ANT 5283. Hunters and Gatherers. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

A study of the major issues archaeologists address concerning the cultural ecology and cultural evolution of hunters and gatherers around the world.

ANT 5313. Seminar in Archaeological Research Techniques. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

This course addresses key archaeological research strategies involved in the acquisition and analysis of archaeological data. Topics may include survey and excavation strategies as well as analyses of various archaeological materials, such as ceramics or lithics. The course highlights the integration of these techniques into broader research designs and their application to important questions about the past. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

ANT 5413. Seminar in the Prehistory of Texas and Adjacent Areas. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Intensive study of prehistoric and early historic aboriginal cultures of Texas and adjacent areas. Focus is on problems of interpretation, current archaeological research of the region, and the impact of federal legislation on Texas archaeology.

ANT 5453. Seminar on the Archaeology of the American Southwest and Adjacent Regions. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Review of the major prehistoric cultures of the American Southwest, including the Anasazi, Mogollon, and Hohokam cultural regions and adjacent areas. Emphasis is on current research.

ANT 5483. Landscape and Settlement. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

This course explores the wide array of data and theories used to identify and explain the patterned distribution of human activity. The significance of settlement pattern data is underscored, and relationships between data and theory are critically evaluated.

ANT 5553. Field Course in Archaeology. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. The opportunity for advanced training in field procedures and their applications to problem-oriented field research. May be repeated for credit.

ANT 5556. Field Course in Archaeology. (2-12) 6 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. The opportunity for advanced training in field procedures and their applications to problem-oriented field research. May be repeated for credit.

ANT 5563. Seminar in Andean Archaeology and Ethnography. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

This seminar focuses on Andean anthropology from the perspective of archaeology, ethnology and ethnohistory. Topics include the development of civilizations such as Tiwanaku and the Inka, the Colonial period, and the politics of indigenism and the state. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

ANT 5573. Anthropology and Science. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines anthropology’s historical and ongoing relationship to science, scientific theory and the ethnography of science. Attention is paid to methodological, epistemological and ontological debates as they inform current practices.

ANT 5583. Teaching Anthropology. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides students with the opportunity to examine key pedagogical issues that instructors confront in the construction and implementation of a semester-long undergraduate course. Emphasis will be placed on discipline-specific concerns and approaches to teaching. Basic areas of exploration include: fundamentals of putting together a class; educational technology; pedagogical theory and practice; and consideration of changes in higher education and the nature of the job market for academics.

ANT 5603. Ancient Civilizations. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

This course presents a global survey of the development of the world’s ancient civilizations, beginning with the transition to food-producing economies. The case studies include civilizations of both the New World (Maya, Teotihuacan, Tiwanaku, Inka) and the Old World (Mesopotamia, Indus Valley, Egypt, China).

ANT 5613. Seminar in Resource Frontiers. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

This seminar examines the social and environmental implications of resource development at the fringes of the global economic system. Core readings engage both theory and ethnography to explore the dynamics of actual and intended resource developments on politically and economically marginalized peoples. Topics generally include mining, logging, petroleum development, biotechnology, hunting and trapping, and other areas of interest to the instructor and students.

ANT 5623. Archaeology of Mexico. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

This course charts the development of the civilizations of ancient Mexico as understood through archaeology, art, inscriptions, and historical documents. The societies covered include the Olmec, Zapotec, Teotihuacan, and Aztec.

ANT 5633. Peoples of Mexico and Central America since 1492. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

This course brings together archaeology, ethnography, and ethnohistory to examine the societies and cultures of Mexico and Central America since European Contact, with a focus on indigenous peoples. Topics discussed include native responses to conquest and colonialism; the transformation of Native American economies; and recent indigenous political movements.

ANT 5643. Primates in Ecological Communities. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

This course is a community ecology class focusing on the interactions that primates have with other species and with their habitat. Specific topics to be explored include: models of species diversity, coexistence mechanisms, determinants of primate community density, coevolution, competition, species packing, assembly rules, conservation, and primate-plant interactions such as seed dispersal and pollination.

ANT 6133. Seminar in Medical Anthropology. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

This course offers a study of selected topics in contemporary theories and their application in medical anthropology. Topics include cross-cultural and biocultural approaches to the study of sickness, healing, and healing systems; critical approaches to the study of biomedicine, globalization and international health; meaning-centered approaches to understanding the experience of suffering and pain; and ecological approaches to understanding the relationship between human health, cultural processes, and the environment.

ANT 6213. Topics in the Anthropology of Native North America. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

An organized course examining topics of current interest to anthropologists with a focus on North America. May be repeated for credit.

ANT 6223. The Archaeology of Household and Residence. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the data, methods, and theories used to reconstruct the composition and activities of domestic groups. The relevance of household studies in archaeology is stressed through inspection of the economic, political, and ideological links between domestic groups and broader social formations.

ANT 6233. Topics in the Anthropology of Complex Societies. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Attention focuses on issues central to the comparative study of ancient complex societies. Topics may include, but are not limited to, the development of hierarchical political systems; the nature of divine kingship; agricultural intensification and surplus production; and the collapse of socio-political systems. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

ANT 6303. Seminar in Research Design and Proposal Writing. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

This course familiarizes students with the philosophical foundations of social science research, the structure and types of research designs, and pragmatic considerations of data acquisition and analysis. The relationship between theory and research design and methods is emphasized. The final project is a scholarly research proposal.

ANT 6353. Field Research Methods in Cultural Anthropology. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

The study and practice of field research methods of cultural anthropology emphasizing participant observation and use of informants.

ANT 6443. Supervised Field Research. (0-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. The course is designed to offer the opportunity for intensive training and requires the student to carry out independent research and analysis of field data. The grade report for the course is either “CR” (satisfactory performance) or “NC” (unsatisfactory performance). May be repeated for credit, but not more than 3 hours may be applied to the Doctoral degree.

ANT 6446. Supervised Field Research. (0-0) 6 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. The course is designed to offer the opportunity for intensive training and requires the student to carry out independent research and analysis of field data. The grade report for the course is either “CR” (satisfactory performance) or “NC” (unsatisfactory performance). May be repeated for credit, but not more than 3 hours may be applied to the Doctoral degree.

ANT 6503. Seminar in Cultural Resource Management. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

This seminar reviews the legislative basis, practical application, and current state of cultural resource management in Texas and the United States.

ANT 6513. Maya Civilization. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

This course brings together archaeological data, art and iconography, ancient texts, colonial documents, paleoenvironmental studies, and ethnographic accounts to present the rich and complex history of Maya civilization, from its origins to the present time. Special attention will be given to the Classic period (A.D. 300–900).

ANT 6603. Ecological Anthropology. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Doctoral Program in Anthropology or consent of instructor. This course explores anthropology’s engagements with the environment, emphasizing historical trends and recent developments across the discipline. Explicit attention is paid to empirical studies and to the theories and assumptions anthropologists have brought to their research.

ANT 6623. Seminar in Analytical Methods in Archaeology. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Basic quantitative and qualitative approaches to the analysis and interpretation of archaeological field and laboratory data are reviewed. (Formerly ANT 5513. Credit cannot be earned for both ANT 6623 and ANT 5513.).

ANT 6643. Seminar in Culture and Economy. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

This course offers a background in economic anthropology through the study of production, distribution, and consumption from a cross-cultural perspective. Topics may include: the history of economic approaches in anthropology; comparisons of economies across different scales of complexity; the articulation of capitalist and noncapitalist modes of production; and resource extraction, management, and development in various cultural and political contexts.

ANT 6653. Spatial Techniques in Anthropology. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

This course explores topics in the theories and techniques of spatial analysis, the operation of geographic information systems, and the use of digital and remotely sensed imagery. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

ANT 6663. Research Methods in Ecological Anthropology. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides an overview of various field research methods used by ecological anthropologists. Topics include sampling and research design, quantitative and qualitative ranking, mapping and transects, resource inventories, participatory appraisal, preparing environmental specimens, and other applicable methods chosen by the instructor. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

ANT 6703. Human Population Ecology. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Doctoral Program in Anthropology or consent of instructor. A synthesis of core constructs in population ecology as they apply to the anthropological study of human populations. The focus is on understanding biocultural variables and multiplicity of causality in human population ecology. Topics include human demography and reproductive ecology; behavioral ecology and life history theory; epidemiology and the environmental history of human health and disease; conflict and cooperation within and between human populations; and, sustainability and the human impact on the natural environment.

ANT 6713. Topics in Primatological Research. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

This course draws from current literature in primate behavioral ecology. Topics include kinship and dominance, feeding competition, mating strategies, and social organization. The contribution of primate studies to understanding human evolution is considered. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. (Formerly ANT 5733. Credit cannot be earned for both ANT 6713 and ANT 5733.) (Formerly titled “Seminar in Primate Behavioral Ecology.”).

ANT 6723. Seminar in Culture, Environment, and Conservation. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

This course takes an anthropological approach to the analysis of environmental conservation. The core readings focus on community-based projects that join actors across cultural and political divides. Students will engage critiques of conservationist ideology and practice in order to envision more effective ways to protect threatened environments and the rights of their human and nonhuman inhabitants.

ANT 6803. Medical Ecology. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

This seminar draws on different anthropological approaches to understanding the relationship between human health and the environment. Topics include the political ecology of health; ecology and evolution of health and illness; health, development and global change; and praxis-oriented perspectives on environmental health.

ANT 6823. Human-Animal Relations. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

This course is centered on the interactions between human and nonhuman animals. Topics may include animal histories, agencies and behaviors; the role of animals in biotechnology, research, and agricultural practices; domesticates and companion species; animal rights and human values; cross-cultural classification and the social construction of animals.

ANT 6853. Topics in Human Evolution. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines evolutionary theory, hominid taxonomy and selected topics in human evolution. Topics may include hominin origins, cerebral expansion and the emergence of culture, modern human origins, and the role of environmental change in human evolution. May be repeated for credit with approval of instructor.

ANT 6863. Evolution of Human Diet. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

All species have unique adaptations for procuring energy from their environment, as well as adaptations that they share with other species. This course explores the evolutionary underpinnings and ecological implications of these adaptations within the Order Primates. Topics include: metabolism, nutritional requirements, the influence of plant defense chemicals on feeding, the evolution of body size and its implications for diet and feeding, sensory ecology, hypotheses for the evolution of human diet, and dietary implications for modern human health and the origin of medicine.

ANT 6873. Energy, the Brain and the Gut in Primate and Human Evolution. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

This course centers on the brain and gut in human and primate evolution. This will include evaluations of the interactions between these two anatomical systems and their relationship with the acquisition of energy in the diet of fossil hominins, modern humans, and nonhuman primates. Other topics include the anatomy of the gut and brain, metabolism, dietary quality and energy, digestion, and interactions between the gut and brain.

ANT 6903. Anthropology of Gender. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

This course offers a critical assessment of disciplinary approaches to understanding sexuality, gender roles, and social and biological reproduction. Additional consideration is given to how femininity and masculinity have been represented in anthropological research and texts.

ANT 6923. Conservation of Primates and Other Threatened Species. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Ecological and anthropological examination of contemporary problems and issues regarding the conservation of threatened species, with an emphasis on nonhuman primates. Topics to be covered include successes and failures in the conservation arena; deforestation, fragmentation, and habitat loss; hunting and the pet trade; genetics of conservation; effects of species loss on ecological communities; and efficacy of community-conservation approaches focused on local human populations.

ANT 6933. Internship in Anthropology. (0-0) 3 Credit Hours.

A supervised experience, relevant to the student’s program of study, within selected community organizations. Must be taken on a credit/no-credit basis. May be repeated for credit.

ANT 6951. Independent Study. (0-0) 1 Credit Hour.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission in writing (form available) of the instructor, the Graduate Advisor of Record, and the Department Chair. Independent reading, research, discussion, and/or writing under the direction of a faculty member. For students needing specialized work not normally or not often available as part of the regular course offerings. May be repeated for credit.

ANT 6952. Independent Study. (0-0) 2 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission in writing (form available) of the instructor, the Graduate Advisor of Record, and the Department Chair. Independent reading, research, discussion, and/or writing under the direction of a faculty member. For students needing specialized work not normally or not often available as part of the regular course offerings. May be repeated for credit.

ANT 6953. Independent Study. (0-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission in writing (form available) of the instructor, the Graduate Advisor of Record, and the Department Chair. Independent reading, research, discussion, and/or writing under the direction of a faculty member. For students needing specialized work not normally or not often available as part of the regular course offerings. May be repeated for credit.

ANT 6961. Comprehensive Examination. (0-0) 1 Credit Hour.

Prerequisite: Approval of the appropriate Graduate Program Committee to take the Comprehensive Examination. Independent study course for the purpose of taking the Comprehensive Examination. May be repeated as many times as approved by the Graduate Program Committee. Enrollment is required each term in which the Comprehensive Examination is taken if no other courses are being taken that term. The grade report for the course is either “CR” (satisfactory performance on the Comprehensive Examination) or “NC” (unsatisfactory performance on the Comprehensive Examination).

ANT 6973. Special Problems. (3-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. An organized course offering the opportunity for specialized study not normally or not often available as part of the regular course offerings. Special Problems courses may be repeated for credit when the topics vary.

ANT 6981. Master’s Thesis. (0-0) 1 Credit Hour.

Prerequisites: Permission of the Graduate Advisor of Record and thesis director. Thesis research and preparation. May be repeated for credit, but not more than 6 hours will apply to the Master’s degree. Credit will be awarded upon completion of the thesis. Enrollment is required each term in which the thesis is in progress.

ANT 6982. Master’s Thesis. (0-0) 2 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: Permission of the Graduate Advisor of Record and thesis director. Thesis research and preparation. May be repeated for credit, but not more than 6 hours will apply to the Master’s degree. Credit will be awarded upon completion of the thesis. Enrollment is required each term in which the thesis is in progress.

ANT 6983. Master’s Thesis. (0-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: Permission of the Graduate Advisor of Record and thesis director. Thesis research and preparation. May be repeated for credit, but not more than 6 hours will apply to the Master’s degree. Credit will be awarded upon completion of the thesis. Enrollment is required each term in which the thesis is in progress.

ANT 6991. Pre-Doctoral Research. (0-0) 1 Credit Hour.

Prerequisites: Consent of Supervising Professor and the Ph.D. Graduate Advisor of Record; must be a doctoral student. Supervised research conducted prior to completion of the qualifying examination. Pre-doctoral research hours do not apply to the doctoral program of study. The grade report for this course is either “CR” (satisfactory performance) or “NC” (unsatisfactory performance). May be repeated for credit, but not more than 3 hours will apply to the Doctoral degree.

ANT 6992. Pre-Doctoral Research. (0-0) 2 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: Consent of Supervising Professor and the Ph.D. Graduate Advisor of Record; must be a doctoral student. Supervised research conducted prior to completion of the qualifying examination. Pre-doctoral research hours do not apply to the doctoral program of study. The grade report for this course is either “CR” (satisfactory performance) or “NC” (unsatisfactory performance). May be repeated for credit, but not more than 3 hours will apply to the Doctoral degree.

ANT 6993. Pre-Doctoral Research. (0-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: Consent of Supervising Professor and the Ph.D. Graduate Advisor of Record; must be a doctoral student. Supervised research conducted prior to completion of the qualifying examination. Pre-doctoral research hours do not apply to the doctoral program of study. The grade report for this course is either “CR” (satisfactory performance) or “NC” (unsatisfactory performance). May be repeated for credit, but not more than 3 hours will apply to the Doctoral degree.

ANT 7003. Dissertation Proposal. (0-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: Consent of Supervising Professor and the Ph.D. Graduate Advisor of Record; must be a doctoral student. Preparation and writing of dissertation proposal. May be repeated for credit, but not more than 3 hours will apply to the Doctoral degree. The grade report for the course is either “CR” (satisfactory performance) or “NC” (unsatisfactory performance).

ANT 7011. Directed Doctoral Research. (0-0) 1 Credit Hour.

Prerequisites: Permission of the Ph.D. Graduate Advisor of Record and dissertation director; must be a Ph.D. candidate. Doctoral research and preparation. May be repeated for credit, but not more than 12 hours will apply to the Doctoral degree. Enrollment in either ANT 7011-3 or ANT 7021-3, depending on progress, is required each term in which the dissertation is in progress.

ANT 7012. Directed Doctoral Research. (0-0) 2 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: Permission of the Ph.D. Graduate Advisor of Record and dissertation director; must be a Ph.D. candidate. Doctoral research and preparation. May be repeated for credit, but not more than 12 hours will apply to the Doctoral degree. Enrollment in either ANT 7011-3 or ANT 7021-3, depending on progress, is required each term in which the dissertation is in progress.

ANT 7013. Directed Doctoral Research. (0-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: Permission of the Ph.D. Graduate Advisor of Record and dissertation director; must be a Ph.D. candidate. Doctoral research and preparation. May be repeated for credit, but not more than 12 hours will apply to the Doctoral degree. Enrollment in either ANT 7011-3 or ANT 7021-3, depending on progress, is required each term in which the dissertation is in progress.

ANT 7021. Doctoral Dissertation. (0-0) 1 Credit Hour.

Prerequisites: Permission of the Ph.D. Graduate Advisor of Record and dissertation director; must be a Ph.D. candidate. Preparation and writing of the Doctoral dissertation. May be repeated for credit, but not more than 12 hours will apply to the Doctoral degree. Enrollment in either ANT 7021-3 or ANT 7011-3, depending on progress, is required each term in which the dissertation is in progress.

ANT 7022. Doctoral Dissertation. (0-0) 2 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: Permission of the Ph.D. Graduate Advisor of Record and dissertation director; must be a Ph.D. candidate. Preparation and writing of the Doctoral dissertation. May be repeated for credit, but not more than 12 hours will apply to the Doctoral degree. Enrollment in either ANT 7021-3 or ANT 7011-3, depending on progress, is required each term in which the dissertation is in progress.

ANT 7023. Doctoral Dissertation. (0-0) 3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: Permission of the Ph.D. Graduate Advisor of Record and dissertation director; must be a Ph.D. candidate. Preparation and writing of the Doctoral dissertation. May be repeated for credit, but not more than 12 hours will apply to the Doctoral degree. Enrollment in either ANT 7021-3 or ANT 7011-3, depending on progress, is required each term in which the dissertation is in progress.